Shop with us!!! We sell the most advanced skin care anti-aging cosmetics on the market: cellex-c, phytomer, sothys, dermalogica, md formulations, decleor, valmont, kinerase, yonka, jane iredale, thalgo, yon-ka, ahava, bioelements, jan marini, peter thomas roth, murad, ddf, orlane, glominerals, StriVectin SD.
 
 back to skin care discussion board front page with forums indexEDS Skin Care Forums Search the ForumSearch Most popular all-time Forum TopicsHot! Library
 Guidelines  FAQ  Register
Free gifts for Forum MembersForum Gifts Free Gifts offers at Essential Day SpaFree Gifts Offers  Log in



Anthony Logistics Instant Fix Oil Control (85 g / 3 oz) Tanda ZAP - White Anthony Logistics Wake Up Call Hydrating Treatment Gel (90 ml / 3 floz)
Lightstim LED Device

EDS Skin Care Forums Forum Index » Skincare Tools & Do-It-Yourself Skincare
Reply to topic
Author Message
Keliu
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 27 Jun 2006
Posts: 6560
Sat Aug 08, 2009 5:58 pm      Reply with quote
I think the bottom line is - it's safe to use the LED everyday, in other words, you're not going to cook your skin. However, as Kassy says, it's prudent to give your skin a break from everything that we bombard it with - if only I could practice what I preach!

_________________
Born 1950. There's a new cream on the market that gets rid of wrinkles - you smear it on the mirror!!
milbader
Senior Member
10% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 21 Jan 2009
Posts: 238
Sat Aug 08, 2009 6:37 pm      Reply with quote
I am going to try taking a break and using only 2-3 times per week as see what happens. What I will do on the "off" days is to start working on a different area.

It is not as if I don't have plenty of places to improve Laughing Laughing Laughing
yogagirl89
Full Member
5% products discount

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 16 Feb 2009
Posts: 10
Sat Aug 08, 2009 7:34 pm      Reply with quote
I have been using my AALS for about 8 months now and my skin has really improved. I still use it 5-6 times a week for 3 minutes per area. Overall my skintone continues to even out (much less pink/red tones) and smooth out (the fine lines around my eyes and mouth seem to have "filled in" somewhat). I have not had a breakout (other than a lone pimple or two) since before last Thanksgiving! My husband, who has beautiful skin (thanks to great genes), has also been using our AALS. Although he began with much fewer "issues," using the AALS 2-3 times per week (2 minutes per area) has given his skin a smoother appearance as well as a healthy glow. I hope this update is helpful to anyone just starting out or considering buying a LightStim device.
lindylass
Full Member
5% products discount

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 01 Dec 2008
Posts: 42
Sat Aug 08, 2009 8:20 pm      Reply with quote
Kassy and Company,

I injured my shoulder; I have adhesions between the ball and socket preventing rotation, a damaged bicipidal tendon and possible rotator cuff damage. I've been training for a marathon, but my shoulder injury is affecting the way my body moves as a whole and my left leg is getting hurt as well. Who is using the Lightstim for physical injuries, inflammation and soft tissue damage? Any success?
Kassy_A
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 25 Oct 2007
Posts: 4120
Sat Aug 08, 2009 9:02 pm      Reply with quote
lindylass wrote:
Kassy and Company,

I injured my shoulder; I have adhesions between the ball and socket preventing rotation, a damaged bicipidal tendon and possible rotator cuff damage. I've been training for a marathon, but my shoulder injury is affecting the way my body moves as a whole and my left leg is getting hurt as well. Who is using the Lightstim for physical injuries, inflammation and soft tissue damage? Any success?


You poor thing, you are under a Docs care for this right?

I have a wicked knee, and also osteoarthritis in spine and all joints. My original LED (red/infrared) helps a great deal in most areas to reduce inflammation and ease the pain..(I'd say on the 1 to 10 pain scale, it brings it from an 8 to a 4, which keeps me out of the narcotic drawer.. Embarassed ) I've tried the AALS, which works better for reducing swelling, but doesn't relieve the pain quite as much. (Same pain scale from 8 to 5).. Advil or Motrin then relieve it further and help me get a nights sleep.

_________________
♥I'm flattered by all the lovely PM's, but I don't get here much these days. Please don't be afraid to post your quearies to other DIY members who will be glad to help you (or sell you their wares..lol) Still happy with LED, dermarolling and a DIY antioxidant regime. Peace & Hugs to all.♥
faeriedust
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 30 Mar 2007
Posts: 513
Sat Aug 08, 2009 9:23 pm      Reply with quote
I thought I'll update my results after a week of consistent everyday use although I skipped it yesterday.
Okay Im not sure if it's the lightstim or the dermaroller, but I think my skintone has become slightly more even. Previously my cheeks are were white and translucent and the t zone area is darker and thicker looking.
I guess it's the lightstim since I only first started using the dermaroller few days after I got the lightstim.
My red marks and spider veins (is that what you call it?) are still there though. Im going to keep using it everyday and hope for better results.
Kassy, you love the lightstim right? What are your thoughts on the dermawave? Im lemming for it now. LOL.

_________________
23yr old Asian with combination skin prone to clogged pores. hyperpigmentation from pimples. uneven skintone, scars
milbader
Senior Member
10% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 21 Jan 2009
Posts: 238
Sat Aug 08, 2009 10:16 pm      Reply with quote
Sorry to hear about the arthritis Kassy. I to have it in both hips and lower back...and now I think my left wrist. Celebrex is what the Dr is having me take. It works well enough right now.

I never thought about ordering a red LED for the pain. Will look into it!
Kassy_A
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 25 Oct 2007
Posts: 4120
Sat Aug 08, 2009 11:00 pm      Reply with quote
faeriedust wrote:
I thought I'll update my results after a week of consistent everyday use although I skipped it yesterday.
Okay Im not sure if it's the lightstim or the dermaroller, but I think my skintone has become slightly more even. Previously my cheeks are were white and translucent and the t zone area is darker and thicker looking.
I guess it's the lightstim since I only first started using the dermaroller few days after I got the lightstim.
My red marks and spider veins (is that what you call it?) are still there though. Im going to keep using it everyday and hope for better results.
Kassy, you love the lightstim right? What are your thoughts on the dermawave? Im lemming for it now. LOL.


Okay, just want to suggest that you talk to Keliu or another roller girl who used the LED, because I believe you are suppose to let the inflammation from dermarolling do it's thing, uninterupted.. So I'm thinking it's not to follow the DR up with the LED for many days.. You should check with the roller girls. Maybe Keliu of one of the others will chime in here.

Spider veins were the last to respond to LED treatment for me, and although they did clear up by 95%, the least provocation brings them back again.. They are very, very faint though, and only visible in a strong magnifying mirror..

Yep, I do love the LightStim, but I always am on the lookout for a better device that might come along.. So far none has.

My opinion of the Derma Wave, (and I really wish you hadn't asked), is that he spent so much time just putting 'Quasar' down on the website, that the info I was looking for was either not there, or hid among the smoke, mirrors and hype.

The questions I have (if anyone knows), are;

1. Where are the *devices* made? (I know he says it's 'put together' in the US, but where do the parts come from?)
2. What grade of diode is used?
3. Whom is putting it together, and what are your qualifications to do so?
4. What is the power that runs it?
5. What is the company address? (Didn't see one!)
6. What is the warranty/return/damage policy?
7. Is this a one man operation + a home based business?
8. Why doesn't anybody answer the phone?
9. What does he feel makes his LED worth so much more money than those that already offer either the same, and/or more effective wavelengths?

Everybody's jumping on the LED bandwagon, and that's great for us because competition among manufacturer's gives us a bit of an edge, as well as keeping prices competitive... Then it's up to us, to do our research, and get to the nitty gritty of what's the best our money can buy, and what's a flash in the pan..

The good stuff will always give the best results to the majority, and that's what you will read about over, and over again, from many, many members. Time will tell with this new LED, just the same as it does for all the others. One or two raving reviews does not withstand the test of time here though, if that's all there is.. (Dig up the NuFace thread for a perfect example of a lemming gone bad..(for starters!) Rolling Eyes )

So that's MHO, based on the limited info I could find. I'll look forward to reading the members reviews who have used it a while, and wish everyone the best of results.

_________________
♥I'm flattered by all the lovely PM's, but I don't get here much these days. Please don't be afraid to post your quearies to other DIY members who will be glad to help you (or sell you their wares..lol) Still happy with LED, dermarolling and a DIY antioxidant regime. Peace & Hugs to all.♥
Keliu
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 27 Jun 2006
Posts: 6560
Sun Aug 09, 2009 4:07 am      Reply with quote
Kassy_A wrote:
Okay, just want to suggest that you talk to Keliu or another roller girl who used the LED, because I believe you are suppose to let the inflammation from dermarolling do it's thing, uninterupted.. So I'm thinking it's not to follow the DR up with the LED for many days.. You should check with the roller girls. Maybe Keliu of one of the others will chime in here.


Here I am!! Kassy is right when she says that the general thought was to not use an LED device after rolling - that it was best to just let the inflammation do its thing. However, I was one that chose not to follow that advise and would quite often do a treatment straight after a roll because it calmed me skin down quite a bit.

Then I read this article in Elle magazine. I posted it on another thread but here it is again:

Here's a great article on inflammation found in June's US Elle magazine.

http://www.elle.com/Beauty/Makeup-Skin-Care/Inflammation-Friend-or-Foe/Try-these-skin-care-tips-to-prevent-aging-only-on-ELLE.com2

I think it's interesting to see that Dr. Brandt gives a Gentle Waves treatment after using a laser - I've quite often used my LED after dermarolling but have been worried that I was cancelling out the whole process - it would seem not (according to the good doctor anyway).

Inflammation: Friend or Foe?

The truth behind inflammation, plus skin care products to keep redness and wrinkles at bay
By Maggie Bullock | June 16, 2009 3:00 p.m.

Photo: Steven Krause

Omega-3 tablets, green tea lattes, antioxidant serums: Chances are, you’re already engaged in the fight against inflammation. Medicine’s biggest, baddest buzzword gets more headlines than Lindsay Lohan (albeit in different publications). It’s the subject of countless studies and theories; the basis of more than one “life­saving” diet (see: Mediterranean, Weil, Perricone); and is, according to one skin care entrepreneur, “the single biggest cause of aging.”

On the flip side, inflammation is a large part of why laser resurfacers and acid peels and—according to some experts—even doctor’s-best-friend Retin-A actually work. Each of these engineers a small injury that causes skin to repair itself—which it does through inflammation. No one’s saying you should break up with your derm or toss your tube of Retin-A, but the conflicting claims give pause: Why is one form of inflammation killing us and the other making us prettier—and how are we supposed to know the difference?

But first, perhaps a better question: What is inflammation? That’s the funny part. At its core, inflammation is basic biological border control—a very good thing. Whether you cut your finger or get sneezed on by a flu-ridden colleague, your immune system deploys specialized repair cells, including mast cells and macrophages, that signal waves of other cells and chemicals to arrive on the scene. The cascade is not unlike gut-renovating a house: Enzymes demolish the damaged tissue, then other workers come in and build it back up. Finally—ideally—the body senses the job is done and shuts down the process.

How much inflammation each of us has is believed to be partly genetic, but smoking, allergens, UV rays, pollution, and hormones (stress-related cortisol, for one) can provoke more of it. Cells in the skin and
intestines, for example, are constantly working to kick out the irritants in everything from Marlboros and Doritos to plain old tap water.

Perhaps because of this constant assault, many experts now believe that our repair machinery can get out of whack, stuck in the “on” setting. Chronic inflammation—the bad stuff—has been linked to cancer, heart disease, and Alzheimer’s. In the case of heart attacks, inflammation in the blood vessels can weaken the lining of artery walls and cause fatty deposits, or plaques, to rupture, forming vessel-clogging clots. Autoimmune disorders such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis are, in fact, prime examples of inflammation gone awry; the body has turned its inflammatory (i.e., immune) response on itself, repeatedly assaulting healthy cells in the joints, nerves, and connective tissues.

Though the basic process is the same throughout the body, all inflammation is not created equal—different kinds give us different sensations. If it’s in the brain, we get a headache (hello, hangover); in the liver, stomachache or nausea; in the intestines, upset stomach and cramping. And much of it lurks undercover, an unseen, uninvited guest that we can’t feel at all.

But what, you may well be asking, is it doing to my face? In skin, high levels of inflammation produce exactly what you picture: the redness—and sometimes pain, itching, and flaking—that anyone who suffers from eczema, psoriasis, or rosacea knows all too well. It’s not the infection, per se, that makes these conditions so uncomfortable and unsightly—it’s the body’s war against them. The condition known as chronic actinic dermatitis, in which badly sun-damaged skin becomes dry, scaly, and itchy? That’s inflammation too.

And while clogged pores and built-up oil contribute to the miseries of acne, the condition is also caused by bacteria, which incites—you guessed it—inflammation, sometimes leading to pain and scarring. This can become a particularly vicious circle: Stress also causes inflammation, which leads to acne, which leads to more inflammation, and so on.

But even if your pores are Cate Blanchett– perfect, the day-to-day inflammatory response to pollution, smoke, and UV light is inevitably taking its toll. These irritants unleash free radicals, which attack skin cells’ protective membrane, allowing them to become dehydrated; this ushers in molecules that break down collagen and elastin and release toxins, including more free radicals. The result doesn’t just show up as redness: It’s also part of the spots and wrinkling that we all recognize as aging. “It’s an ongoing, everyday process, and it’s happening to all of us,” says dermatologist Fredric Brandt, MD, who has offices in New York City and Miami.

Just how many of our spots and wrinkles this is responsible for is unknown. As for the potential magnitude of the role inflammation plays in aging, Joel Gelfand, MD, an assistant professor of dermatology at University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, points to an extremely rare—and nightmarish—inflammatory condition, acquired cutis laxa, in which skin loses elasticity and hangs in loose folds. “It’s a very unusual clinical event,” Gelfand says. “But it occurs because inflammation is eating up the elastin, which leads us to believe that inflammation may be a cause of elastin breakdown in the skin. But that’s just a hypothesis. We need studies.”

The danger isn’t just aesthetic. “There is a line of thinking that certain kinds of repeated inflammation can create a nurturing environment for skin cancers,” says Kevin Cooper, MD, who chairs the department of dermatology at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland and was recently recognized by the American Academy of Dermatology for his research on inflammation. “We do know, for instance, that sometimes a wound that doesn’t heal and is chronically inflamed can get a skin cancer inside of it. That makes us worry a little bit that chronic or repeated wounds might raise our risk of cancer.”

While skin cancer has long been assumed to be caused by the DNA mutations inflicted by UV rays, now researchers wonder how much of the problem is, in fact, the body’s self-defense response to the sun—inflammation. A study published last year illustrated the potential of chronic inflammation to help a cancer grow. Scientists at the Lankenau Institute of Medical Research in Philadelphia gave mice a single dose of a carcinogen, then exposed them to a poison ivy derivative twice weekly for 20 weeks. The steady irritation of the poison ivy con­fused the body’s immune response. Therefore, IDO, an enzyme whose job is to shut down the immune response, suppressed the defense troops, allowing precan­cerous cells to develop into tumors.

Cooper predicts sunscreen will one day have an “immune protection factor” rating, similar to SPF, which will measure a cream’s ability to prevent the immune suppression caused by sun exposure. “Is skin cancer the direct effect of UV light on the DNA of the skin? Or is inflammation alone causing it? Probably both,” says Washington, DC, dermatologist Tina Alster, MD. “We don’t know which one is more important.”

All of which leads to the big question: Why on earth would patients pay their dermatologists thousands of dollars just to incite this process?

New York City dermatologist David Orentreich, MD, explains the theory behind these short, sharp bouts of inflammation: “Take the new fractionated CO2 resurfacing laser. It burns skin in a precise, controlled fashion. But the body responds as it would to any burn, removing the damaged components, sending in workman cells.” Due to the nature of the injury, this results in smoother, younger-looking skin instead of an unsightly scar. “Little dots of light make tiny holes in the skin’s surface,” he says. “The healthy tissue surrounding each of the holes knits back together.”

Of course, laser-wielding docs are quick to point out that the inflammation they’re causing is short-term—and productive. “You have to separate the chronic inflammation that causes aging from the acute inflammation caused by treatment,” Brandt says. “Acute stimulates the skin’s repair system, laying down new collagen. But afterward, the white cells in your body issue a termination statement, and it stops.”

“You have to do a little bad to get some good,” Alster declares. “Right now, there’s nothing better than lasers to initiate a new collagen response. There is no topical product that can do that. But the word here is controlled injury.”

Years ago, doctors would prescribe oral steroids to calm post-treatment redness and irritation. “Over time, we realized the inflammation was actually helping to increase the end benefit,” Orentreich says. “Maybe we should do less to quench it.” Now, for the sake of patient comfort and convenience—after all, less downtime makes a procedure sound a whole lot more appealing—there’s an increased interest in modulating the response without quelling it entirely.

For example, after performing fractionated resurfacing treatments, Brandt regularly pops patients in front of the GentleWaves LED panel of yellow light for 35 seconds. “It calms the inflammation and the activity that breaks down the collagen. You want to wound the skin but shorten the inflammatory cascade,” Brandt explains.

Alster recently published a paper in The Journal of Dermatologic Surgery detailing a split-face test: Post-Fraxel resurfacing, she flashed only one side of the face with GentleWaves and left the other alone. The GentleWaves-exposed side recovered quickly, with a day or two less swelling and redness. Interestingly, a week later, both halves had the same cosmetic benefit.

But anyone who’s tried to camouflage an aggravated, overtreated complexion knows that inflammation isn’t just inflicted by high-power laser. What about the irritants in our own bathroom cabinets: rough scrubs and intense peels; harsh, drying cleansers; potent topical treatments? Retin-A (and its fellow prescription retinoids Tazorac, Avage, and Differin) helps lay down new collagen by kick-starting the wound healing process, but it also makes most patients red—at least until skin becomes conditioned to tolerate it. Devotees have been using Retin-A for 37 years; it is a proven antiager and, by regulating cellular turnover, it may have cancer-fighting benefits. But if it works by causing inflammation, wouldn’t daily use make that chronic?

Brandt maintains that most products are not inflammatory as long as they’re used properly. Common sense comes into play: If something continually makes your face red and irritated, well then, don’t use it.

Alster agrees. “People who keep pushing the envelope with inflammation may be doing more harm than good,” she says. “When they come into my office looking very red from using Retin-A, I say, ‘Well, don’t get to that stage. Figure out what works best for you.’ ”

Like every expert interviewed for this article, Alster argues that there is more evidence in favor of acute inflammatory procedures and creams than there is against them. “We don’t know how much inflammation is good and how much is bad—that differs from person to person,” she admits. “But saying that anything that causes inflammation is bad for you? That’s really going out on a limb.”

Still, says Case Western’s Cooper: “Will the kind of inflammation that’s being created by these [dermatological] procedures be helpful in the long run or could it have a dark side down the line? It’s unclear. But it’s reasonable to raise the question.”

_________________
Born 1950. There's a new cream on the market that gets rid of wrinkles - you smear it on the mirror!!
Keliu
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 27 Jun 2006
Posts: 6560
Sun Aug 09, 2009 4:22 am      Reply with quote
Kassy_A wrote:
The questions I have (if anyone knows), are;

1. Where are the *devices* made? (I know he says it's 'put together' in the US, but where do the parts come from?)
2. What grade of diode is used?
3. Whom is putting it together, and what are your qualifications to do so?
4. What is the power that runs it?
5. What is the company address? (Didn't see one!)
6. What is the warranty/return/damage policy?
7. Is this a one man operation + a home based business?
8. Why doesn't anybody answer the phone?
9. What does he feel makes his LED worth so much more money than those that already offer either the same, and/or more effective wavelengths?


I would really like to see these questions answered too. I admit that I'm basically technically dyslexic - so when it comes to LED
specifications, my knowledge is next to zilch. However, I can't understand the huge differences in treatment times and price that come with various devices such as the ProLight, DermaWave and Lightstim - and nobody, so far, has really been able to explain them to me. We've had explanations about the importance of joules - which, according to the DermaWave website, is of no consequence. And the recommended treatment times seem to be plucked out of thin air - what are these treatment times based on?

So, yes, I'd like to see some answers - bring back "The LED Wars" I say!! Bad Grin

_________________
Born 1950. There's a new cream on the market that gets rid of wrinkles - you smear it on the mirror!!
faeriedust
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 30 Mar 2007
Posts: 513
Sun Aug 09, 2009 4:26 am      Reply with quote
Thanks. I was worried I may have lightstimed the inflammation effects of the dermaroller away.

Kassy, what other tools have you tried? Do you have a favourite ultrasonic device? Im looking for one but cant decide between the facemate and prolight ultrasonic/galvanic.

You know I've never really thought of those questions you're asking about dermawave. I googled dermawave and there doesnt seem to be much info on it. Maybe it's relatively new? Have you tried asking Nanci from ncn these questions? Im really curious.

Can you tell me about nuface? lol I noticed some items that were previously raved arent being raved as much now.

_________________
23yr old Asian with combination skin prone to clogged pores. hyperpigmentation from pimples. uneven skintone, scars
Keliu
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 27 Jun 2006
Posts: 6560
Sun Aug 09, 2009 4:45 am      Reply with quote
faeriedust wrote:
Kassy, what other tools have you tried? Do you have a favourite ultrasonic device? Im looking for one but cant decide between the facemate and prolight ultrasonic/galvanic.


Not Kassy, but you might want to have a look at the Bellair ultrasound - I don't have one, I have a UP5, but the Bellair has a very good reputation - plus it's 2MHz.

http://www.ultrabeautydevice.com/

_________________
Born 1950. There's a new cream on the market that gets rid of wrinkles - you smear it on the mirror!!
faeriedust
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 30 Mar 2007
Posts: 513
Sun Aug 09, 2009 5:32 am      Reply with quote
Did you get your UP5 from winhealth? They dont seem to sell it anymore. Do you know of other places to get it?
What's the difference between the scrubber and spatula? Im looking for one to clean out the pores. I always get clogged pores. lol.

_________________
23yr old Asian with combination skin prone to clogged pores. hyperpigmentation from pimples. uneven skintone, scars
Keliu
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 27 Jun 2006
Posts: 6560
Sun Aug 09, 2009 5:44 am      Reply with quote
faeriedust wrote:
Did you get your UP5 from winhealth? They dont seem to sell it anymore. Do you know of other places to get it?
What's the difference between the scrubber and spatula? Im looking for one to clean out the pores. I always get clogged pores. lol.


I did get it from Winhealth and yes, they no longer sell them.

Don't know what the difference is with the scrubber and spatula. I do know that the spatula is a blade shaped head that uses galvanic current. The UP5 doesn't have different heads like the Nuskin Galvanic Spa but it does have 5 different functions.

If you want to address your clogged pores, why don't you think about getting a Clarisonic. I don't have one of those either, but I'd love one - it gets rave reviews by everyone that's got one.

_________________
Born 1950. There's a new cream on the market that gets rid of wrinkles - you smear it on the mirror!!
faeriedust
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 30 Mar 2007
Posts: 513
Sun Aug 09, 2009 6:00 am      Reply with quote
oooh I have a clarisonic on the way! haha okay I guess all I need now is an ultrasonic device. How do you know Bellair is good? I cant find reviews for their ultrasonic device here. Do you know how much it costs?
Gosh Im so overwhelmed by the choices now.

_________________
23yr old Asian with combination skin prone to clogged pores. hyperpigmentation from pimples. uneven skintone, scars
Keliu
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 27 Jun 2006
Posts: 6560
Sun Aug 09, 2009 6:23 am      Reply with quote
faeriedust wrote:
oooh I have a clarisonic on the way! haha okay I guess all I need now is an ultrasonic device. How do you know Bellair is good? I cant find reviews for their ultrasonic device here. Do you know how much it costs?
Gosh Im so overwhelmed by the choices now.


Lucky you!! I think it's Bethany that has the Bellair - and she really does her research. Apparently, it's one of the only ones that has FDA approval. Not sure of the cost, probably around $300.00. I would see how you go with the Clarisonic before buying anything else.

_________________
Born 1950. There's a new cream on the market that gets rid of wrinkles - you smear it on the mirror!!
faeriedust
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 30 Mar 2007
Posts: 513
Sun Aug 09, 2009 6:46 am      Reply with quote
ooooh okay. Bethany uses prolight platinum or one of the LEDs right? Do you know what she thinks about their ultrasonic devices? I think she mentioned using them but Im not sure which brand.
Okay I'll use the clarisonic first before buying anything else. I guess I've become obsessed with all these skin care tools. They're so interesting! Laughing

_________________
23yr old Asian with combination skin prone to clogged pores. hyperpigmentation from pimples. uneven skintone, scars
ricayhermosa
Senior Member
10% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 24 Jun 2009
Posts: 115
Sun Aug 09, 2009 8:27 am      Reply with quote
I definitely get better results when I cut down the frequency. When I used it everyday, my skin got irritated from too much light. Just my 2 cents.
Kassy_A
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 25 Oct 2007
Posts: 4120
Sun Aug 09, 2009 9:37 am      Reply with quote
Sorry to veer a bit off topic here, but I think faeriedust has asked some good questions, so hopefully my answers will help some new members.. There are threads on just about all gadgets covered, so feel free to *bump* the relevant threads for any further input/advice from others.

faeriedust wrote:
Kassy, what other tools have you tried? Do you have a favourite ultrasonic device? Im looking for one but cant decide between the facemate and prolight ultrasonic/galvanic.


NuFace - no effect, and broke within 2 months. (The cheap thin battery wires came apart during the 2nd battery change. It was cumbersome, uncomfortable and awkward to use. I didn't see any difference whatsoever after consistent use until it broke. The one year warranty wasn't honored because I didn't keep the packaging receipt that came with it.. Spalook, where I purchased, said I was 4 days late, and they couldn't exchange or refund my $450.. (They've come down a lot in price since I bought this, wonder why?)

STOP - I had a negative result, with sagging and damage to my neck/jawline. (I believe my device was defective, but the company said, "no it's fine, keep using it"

Dermal Tone - Liked it very much, stopped working after about a year, when lotion got under the probes. I found it easier than I'm finding the Tua Viso, to get correct placement/contraction.

Tua Viso- Can't comment until I give it a go with the new DVD I just recieved. I haven't been consistent with it, because I couldn't duplicate the same contraction on both sides of my face.. I'm hoping this new DVD will sort me out.

Derma Wand - I really love this little gadget. Gives a lovely (cumulative with use) eye lift, pushes in water based serums, zaps an occasional zit at the 1st sign, and just feels so darn good. Love the glow as well!

SS Face Maaster - I only experimented with it about 3 or 4 times, and never got back to it. I think with serious committment, it could be promising.

Vaculifter's - I have all 4, and could have had all my needs met with just the small face + small body.. I love them! They give a wonderful massage, excellent lymphatic drainage and with regular use you will enjoy a firmer, prettier, healthier skin.

I don't have an 'ultrasonic' or 'galvanic' yet, but if I decide to get either I would head to Rita at http://www.prolightaesthetics.com I would need lots of instruction to get it right, and I'd have complete confidence in Rita in that regard. I also appreciate the fact that she prices all of her products affordably, and doesn't try to bleed every penny out of folks. If you then figure in the one on one advise she gives everyone, you are way ahead of the game, as that is invaluable in my opinion.

faeriedust wrote:
Maybe it's relatively new? Have you tried asking Nanci from ncn these questions? Im really curious.

I didn't for the simple reason, I was a bit disgusted after reading his website.. A turnoff to me is when a company can only garner attention, by speaking negatively of the competition.. (Much like politicians! Rolling Eyes )

faeriedust wrote:
Can you tell me about nuface? lol I noticed some items that were previously raved arent being raved as much now.

Have a look above for NuFace. Yep, you will easily recognize what turns out to be the "flash in the pan" I mentioned earlier.

_________________
♥I'm flattered by all the lovely PM's, but I don't get here much these days. Please don't be afraid to post your quearies to other DIY members who will be glad to help you (or sell you their wares..lol) Still happy with LED, dermarolling and a DIY antioxidant regime. Peace & Hugs to all.♥
faeriedust
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 30 Mar 2007
Posts: 513
Sun Aug 09, 2009 10:23 am      Reply with quote
wow thanks! That's really helpful. dermawand sounds nice. I get zits which take a long time to go away and they leave a red mark. Does the dermawand make the zit go away without leaving a mark or scar behind?
Is the glow a temporary thing?

Please get an ultrasonic device soon! Cant wait for your review! Im so torn between prolight and bellaire

_________________
23yr old Asian with combination skin prone to clogged pores. hyperpigmentation from pimples. uneven skintone, scars
rileygirl
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 15 Jan 2006
Posts: 9519
Sun Aug 09, 2009 12:01 pm      Reply with quote
faeriedust wrote:
oooh I have a clarisonic on the way! haha okay I guess all I need now is an ultrasonic device. How do you know Bellair is good? I cant find reviews for their ultrasonic device here. Do you know how much it costs?
Gosh Im so overwhelmed by the choices now.


Bellaire is one of the only (and quite possibly The Only) distributor of the 2 MHz ultrasound. Mr. Yeung is the owner and he is extremely helpful with all questions. He also does not try to sell you what you don't need, which is very refreshing these days.
lindylass
Full Member
5% products discount

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 01 Dec 2008
Posts: 42
Sun Aug 09, 2009 12:05 pm      Reply with quote
Kassy

Thanks for the feedback! Very helpful.
Keliu
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 27 Jun 2006
Posts: 6560
Sun Aug 09, 2009 5:04 pm      Reply with quote
Kassy_A wrote:
I don't have an 'ultrasonic' or 'galvanic' yet, but if I decide to get either I would head to Rita at http://www.prolightaesthetics.com I would need lots of instruction to get it right, and I'd have complete confidence in Rita in that regard. I also appreciate the fact that she prices all of her products affordably, and doesn't try to bleed every penny out of folks. If you then figure in the one on one advise she gives everyone, you are way ahead of the game, as that is invaluable in my opinion.


I was actually thinking of purchasing the Prolight ultrasound because I've used my UP5 so much the plating over the head has worn off. I also wanted to make sure I had a 2MHz model, which I believe the Prolight one is. I emailed Rita to ask her what the treatment protocol for the ultrasound was - because I wanted to make sure I could use it over serums and perhaps water and not have to use a conductive gel. This was her reply:

Thank you for contacting me.

We provide treatment protocols/directions, what product to use, etc. with the purchase of our Ultrasound/Galvanic Device.


Well, I'm not going to purchase something without knowing exactly how I'm supposed to use it and if it suits my purpose. I thought the reply was most unhelpful.

The Bellair is the only other ultrasound that operates on 2MHz - if I do repurchase another ultrasound, that will be the one that I'll go for.

_________________
Born 1950. There's a new cream on the market that gets rid of wrinkles - you smear it on the mirror!!
rileygirl
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 15 Jan 2006
Posts: 9519
Sun Aug 09, 2009 5:12 pm      Reply with quote
This is strictly hearsay, and but I have heard that Rita's galvanic/US is Not a 2 MHz, but actually a 3 MHz. Just wanted to mention that I have heard this and not trying to start WW3, ok? Very Happy
Keliu
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 27 Jun 2006
Posts: 6560
Sun Aug 09, 2009 5:47 pm      Reply with quote
rileygirl wrote:
This is strictly hearsay, and but I have heard that Rita's galvanic/US is Not a 2 MHz, but actually a 3 MHz. Just wanted to mention that I have heard this and not trying to start WW3, ok? Very Happy


Thanks for that - it's really important that we share information. Bellair do claim that theirs is the only 2MHz device on the market - plus it has FDA approval.

_________________
Born 1950. There's a new cream on the market that gets rid of wrinkles - you smear it on the mirror!!
System
Automatic Message
Thu Oct 19, 2017 10:06 pm
If this is your first visit to the EDS Forums please take the time to register. Registration is required for you to post on the forums. Registration will also give you the ability to track messages of interest, send private messages to other users, participate in Gift Certificates draws and enjoy automatic discounts for shopping at our online store. Registration is free and takes just a few seconds to complete.

Click Here to join our community.

If you are already a registered member on the forums, please login to gain full access to the site.

Reply to topic



DeVita Under Eye Repair Serum (15 ml / 0.5 oz) BDB Best Sellers Kit (5 items) Payot Techni Liss First First Wrinkles Smoothing Care (50 ml / 1.6 floz)