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Which essential oils might kill MRSA?

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existential lady
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Sat Oct 20, 2007 8:31 am      Reply with quote
There has been a lot of attention in the media lately about a dangerous staph variety that is resistant to all except one drug. Now acc. to the BBC news, however, I quote:
"The team then tested 40 essential oils against 10 of the most infectious agents found in hospitals, including MRSA (methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus).

Two of the oils were found to kill MRSA and E.coli almost instantly, while a third was found to act over a longer period of time.

However, the researchers say they are unable to reveal which oils carry benefits because of commercial sensitivities."

Do any of our knowledgeable ladies want to hazard a guess as to which oil(s) might be the one(s)? I am in a class of people for whom MRSA could be a killer. I think it is disingenuous of the researchers to keep this information to themselves.
rosebud
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Sat Oct 20, 2007 9:05 am      Reply with quote
I read somewhere that Tee Tree Oil can kill MRSA, also Neem Oil.

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Sat Oct 20, 2007 9:47 am      Reply with quote
This lab-tested blend of essential oils from Nature's Gift is what I've used... Smile The gel is $11 and the wash $14.

MERCY Soap and Treatment Gel
for MRSA-(drug resistant "staph")
from Nature's Gift

"Some time ago we were contacted by a holistic nurse/client in Wisconsin and asked to take part in a research project. Reading she had done indicated that a body wash, containing lavender and tea tree essential oils, if left on the skin for a period of time, could be effective against MRSA (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus).

We tested different strengths and combinations until we found the mixture that was 100% effective in the laboratory. This particular combination killed the MRSA bacteria in a laboratory culture. The results have been repeated and replicated. Oddly enough, we found that no single essential oil completely killed the bacteria. (Although the most effective was a rare Spike Lavender from France, which, of course, we promptly imported!)

We later went on to test a "leave on" version. The same blend, at a different dilution, in our gentle organic aloe vera gel. It too kills the MRSA bacteria under laboratory conditions.

Human trials are being organized in Wisconsin even as I type. But we are unwilling to wait to release the product that has been tested. (And the nurses want to order it for their personal use!)

Will our MERCY Body Wash and/or Treatment Gel kill the MRSA bacteria if you come in contact with it? We don't know. And even if we did know, we couldn't say so, due to various federal laws and regulations.

What we can say is that the soap will clean your skin, and contains proven natural anti-bacterial ingredients, and that the treatment gel will soothe your skin, while also providing proven, natural all organic anti-bacterial ingredients."

http://www.naturesgift.com/aromatherapyskincare.htm#MRSA
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Sat Oct 20, 2007 9:52 am      Reply with quote
Great post! Please keep us updated. Thanks

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Sat Oct 20, 2007 10:29 am      Reply with quote
What about oregano oil?

http://bio-alternatives.net/buyoregano.htm

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Sat Oct 20, 2007 2:40 pm      Reply with quote
nadjazz wrote:
What about oregano oil?

http://bio-alternatives.net/buyoregano.htm


I got a bottle of oregano oil in my local health food store based on the idea that it is safe for internal use and similar qualities such as tea tree oil.

Be warned that if you decide to use internally, the stuff is awful!! The taste stayed in mouth for what seems hours!!
avalange
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Sat Oct 20, 2007 7:00 pm      Reply with quote
manuka oil should work, too--it's in the tea tree family but much stronger in terms of antiseptic and antibacterial properties.

tea tree is melaleuca and manuka is, well, manuka.

it's a plant that is native to NZ.

--avalange

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Sat Oct 20, 2007 7:16 pm      Reply with quote
Echinacea isn't an essential oil, but it's an herb, and I know from experience that drinking Echinacea tea helps strengthen resistance to colds and flu. I usually stop drinking it during the summer, but when I heard about MRSA, I started drinking it again. I figure the more the protection we can get the better.

Quote:
Echinacea increases bodily resistance to infection and is used for boils, erysipelas (a superficial infection of the skin), septicaemia (blood poisoning), syphilis and other impurities of the blood, its action being antiseptic. It has also useful properties as a strong alterative and aphrodisiac. The extract has been used for hemorrhoids. Unlike antibiotics, which are directly lethal to bacteria, echinacea makes our own immune cells more efficient in attacking bacteria, viruses and abnormal cells, including cancer cells.

http://www.bestdeal.org/essential-camden/h-echi-org-1lb.html

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Sat Oct 20, 2007 9:23 pm      Reply with quote
autumn95 wrote:
nadjazz wrote:
What about oregano oil?

http://bio-alternatives.net/buyoregano.htm


I got a bottle of oregano oil in my local health food store based on the idea that it is safe for internal use and similar qualities such as tea tree oil.

Be warned that if you decide to use internally, the stuff is awful!! The taste stayed in mouth for what seems hours!!


OMG, tell me about it!!! I hate this stuff, and only take it if I'm super super sick because the taste is soooo wretched!!! It lingers for hours and worse, even touching the outside of the bottle makes my hands smell awful!

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existential lady
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Sat Oct 20, 2007 10:41 pm      Reply with quote
Thanks everyone, for the suggestions. I see some of the web sites you point out actually mention MRSA. Since a bedridden family member has this, I was already a little worried about it even before it became a news item recently. (I know we all carry it on our skin.) Now I just have to figure out how best to use the information you've given; that is, whether it's worth it to get the special mixtures with the tea tree oil in them. Although in the news it says that handwashing is the most important thing we can do, it may be better to use the above for extra protection.
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Sun Oct 21, 2007 9:59 am      Reply with quote
You are not serious that oils can cure this deadly infection its not being careful enough around sick and vunerable people and not washing hands etc
existential lady
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Sun Oct 21, 2007 10:14 am      Reply with quote
Lola, I think we are talking about prevention, not cure. Some of us have to be exposed to this every day in caregiving situations and anything that helps is miraculous. The researchers that tested this are thinking of putting the oils in soap etc. for use in hospitals etc. to aid in cutting down on its spread. They wouldn't, however, reveal the names of the oils. Because of "commercial" reasons. So in the meantime we have to wait for R&D of some big company to start with supplying us with something that is already available!!!
Obviously, everyone who has it in their system, not just on skin or in the nose where we all have it, got it from somebody else. Anyway, it is all very complicated and I am not in this field, but I just wanted to ascertain that the oil is most likely tea tree and some of the others mentioned.
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Sun Oct 21, 2007 11:00 am      Reply with quote
For those talking about the oregano oil...

please, please, please tell me that you are not taking straight drops of the oil. Please tell me you are diluting it in olive oil or something.

When I am sick I only get out my oregano oil and INHALE it. I suppose if I got really sick I would ingest it, but only diluted.

As a precaution I will sometimes take some good olive oil and shake it with a few drops of the oregano oil and some crushed garlic and put in some good balsamic vinegar. Then I get a good loaf of crusty, hearty bread... and eat!

Delicious and good for me all around!

ALL essential oils must be diluted for safety. They are soooooo concentrated. Their effectiveness is still there even in the diluted state.

Andrea
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Sun Oct 21, 2007 4:49 pm      Reply with quote
Well,this morning after having a cold and sinus for at least a week.
I got desperate...I put one drop of pure Oregano Oil in my Neti Pot.(Nasal Irrigation) and OMG the pain,the stinging,the yuck of it all.
But,after recovering,my sinuses are much,much better. I will DILUTE MORE next time. I had about 10 oz of warm salted water this time.I will at least double that.
I buy empty gelatin capsules and put a drop of Oregano oil and olive oil. It is easier for me to take. But,it is important to eat and drink something as suggested by others.
For me it works,but wish it was nicer to use.
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Sun Oct 21, 2007 5:55 pm      Reply with quote
itsmedrea wrote:
For those talking about the oregano oil...

please, please, please tell me that you are not taking straight drops of the oil. Please tell me you are diluting it in olive oil or something.

When I am sick I only get out my oregano oil and INHALE it. I suppose if I got really sick I would ingest it, but only diluted.

As a precaution I will sometimes take some good olive oil and shake it with a few drops of the oregano oil and some crushed garlic and put in some good balsamic vinegar. Then I get a good loaf of crusty, hearty bread... and eat!

Delicious and good for me all around!

ALL essential oils must be diluted for safety. They are soooooo concentrated. Their effectiveness is still there even in the diluted state.

Andrea


Andrea--- thank you for the tip about the crusty bread! To answer your question, of course when I take the OoO I dilute it with lots of olive oil. Even so, I would definitely say that taking it is not a pleasant experience. You're right that we need to be careful with it!

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itsmedrea
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Sun Oct 21, 2007 9:00 pm      Reply with quote
Hey Liz,

Sorry for assuming.

I can't remember it being really bad or strong tasting.

I do have to say that mostly I will just open my bottle and inhale it (deeply, many times!)

Andrea
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Mon Oct 22, 2007 4:45 am      Reply with quote
The handsoap I use from Trader Joe's has lavender and tea tree oil in it. I think it's called "Next to Godliness" or something.
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Mon Oct 22, 2007 8:42 am      Reply with quote
I just posted a list of other EOs that fight staph in the DIY Recipes thread, in addition to Lavender and Tea Tree, as my mom has been fighting a severe staph infection outbreak on her face and the antibiotics the derma-doc give her have been useless but the oil-blend I made for her have nearly healed it completely in just 1 1/2 days of treatment! So, yeah, I'd say these oils *can* cure MRSA.

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Mon Oct 22, 2007 9:09 am      Reply with quote
Unbelievable that some of my favorite EO's are powerful enough to kill staph! Thanks for sharing this Havana, I've added the website you cited to my favorites. I'll also be sure to have this onhand if one of my loved ones ever has to go to hospital.

thanks for sharing,

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Mon Oct 22, 2007 9:27 am      Reply with quote
I'm surprised that no one still is acknowledging manuka oil for this...

one search on manuka, and tons of hits claiming its effectivity against MRSA came up...

Quote:
Oil from a Manuka tree growing in the Te Araroa region of the East Cape of New Zealand shows a much higher antibacterial activity than oil from Manuka trees in other regions.
"Manuka Oil was 20-30 times more active than Australian Tea Tree Oil"
for gram positive bacteria, and 5-10 times more active for fungi.

New Zealand Manuka Oil is Effective Against Bacteria and Fungus Infections
Uses: Acne, Pimples, Eczema, Ring Worm, Skin Rash, Chafing, Itching, Dandruff, Bed Sores, Athlete's Foot, Nail Bed Infections, Foot Odor, Body Odor, Cuts, Abrasions, Insect Bites & Stings, Sunburn, Muscle Ache, Aching Joints,
and Aromatherapy for Stress and Anxiety
Traditional Uses of the Manuka Tree
Manuka Only in the last decade has the Manuka tree begun to be recognized and understood through science, but the Maori (who are the indigenous people of New Zealand) have long known the strength and healing ability of the Manuka tree.

Manuka has been used to treat a range of skin problems including chronic sores, ring worm and eczema. Others reported that a decoction of Manuka leaves was drunk for urinary complaints and to reduce fever. The leaves were boiled in water and inhaled for head colds, blocked sinuses, hayfever, even bronchitis and asthma. Leaves and bark were boiled together, and the warm liquid was rubbed on stiff backs and rheumatic joints. The leaves and young branches were put into vapor baths. The crushed Manuka leaves were applied as a poultice for many skin diseases and were directly applied to wounds and deep gashes to enhance healing and reduce the risk of infection. The young shoots of the Manuka tree were chewed and swallowed for dysentery. The bark, the sap, and the seed capsules of the Manuka tree were also used extensively for treating various ailments.

Clearly, Manuka was an important medicinal plant, both to the Maori and to the original European settlers who, in the early years of settlement, depended on Maori knowledge of medicinal plants in treating their own illnesses.

Scientific Research on Manuka
Although the Manuka tree had attracted scientific interest in the past, little had been found of real importance - until some Manuka oil samples were tested by Dr. Cooke of the Cawthron Institute and showed some remarkable results.

The Cawthron Institute research, conducted on behalf of the Company, showed that the oil produced from the Manuka trees in the Te Araroa region of the East Cape displayed antimicrobial activity far greater than had been seen with other Manuka oil samples and greater than many other natural oils.

The testing showed Manuka Oil to be active against a wide range of micro-organisms that cause irritation and infection of the skin and body. Some of them were serious, such as MRSA (more commonly known as the H-bug or Staph. A.) and others were more common ones, such as those that cause Athlete's Foot.

Research conducted for the Company has determined that the reason for the unusually high levels of antimicrobial activity is due to the presence of relatively high concentrations (20-30%) of cyclic triketones, particularly Leptospermone, Isoleptospermone and Flavesone.

Research shows these compounds to possess mild insecticidal properties. These compounds also appear to be responsible for the beneficial effect of restricting the diffusion of toxins and lessening the adverse reaction to insect bites and stings. They also have a calming effect to itchy and irritated skin.

The Cawthron Institute concluded that "Manuka Oil was 20 to 30 times more active than Australian Tea Tree Oil" for gram positive bacteria, and 5 to 10 times more active for fungi. Further testing has confirmed that Manuka Oil is effective in combating bacteria including those associated with acne, as well as foot and body odor.

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Mon Oct 22, 2007 10:36 am      Reply with quote
Avalange, thanks for the input on manuka. I had already ordered the items that havana8 pointed out. But I will get some manuka as well, especially since it can be used for so many different ailments. Do you have a special source for it that you like?
So you are no longer in merry Paris? And where did la vie en rose go? No more vicarious French living for me/us???
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Mon Oct 22, 2007 10:46 am      Reply with quote
Avalange, I'm curious -- I don't consider the Web at large to be the best source for information, but everything I've ever read says that tea tree and manuka are the exact same plant. I see from your posts that tea tree is "melaleuca" and manuka is... "manuka". Very Happy I'm just wondering, do you know of any sources that accurately detail the difference? I'm all curious now, as I had never even heard of manuka before EDS, and I'd like to know how they differ, aside from the names. Smile

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Mon Oct 22, 2007 12:23 pm      Reply with quote
hi existential and ginnie,

manuka is definitely a different plant than tea tree. it is native to new zealand. i am preparing to teach right now so i cannot go into specifics, but suffice it to say that i was introduced to manuka well before the internet became a universal source of information and misinformation. you can buy the plant at nurseries if you like--the u.s. now imports it.
it really is MUCH more potent than tea tree oil, i.e. one drop taken internally several days in a row will precipitate a complete, er, 'cleanse,' and eradicates candida.
these are just some of the ways friends have used manuka in the past. it basically does have the same attributes as tea tree but is far more potent.
i was introduced to the plant via a company called "living nature," from NZ, their products are really wonderful. They have a manuka antiseptic gel that is one of the best products available, and they also sell manuka oil neat. I used to be a buyer for bath and beauty products and I purchased this line for the store I was buying for--I met the owner of the company, Suzanne, and she is truly lovely and very knowledgeable.
you can also buy high-quality manuka honey, which would clearly have even more antibacterial qualities, at the health food store. if you do a search there have been discussions about the topical use of manuka honey--but i've never tried it.

existential--i know, paris is a thing of the past for me--now i'm just teaching in chicago, like you (i think)!

--avalange

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Mon Oct 22, 2007 12:40 pm      Reply with quote
According to this article, one of the EOs is Tea Tree Oil.
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=3533
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Mon Oct 22, 2007 12:47 pm      Reply with quote
ginnielizz wrote:
...but everything I've ever read says that tea tree and manuka are the exact same plant. I see from your posts that tea tree is "melaleuca" and manuka is... "manuka". Very Happy I'm just wondering, do you know of any sources that accurately detail the difference? I'm all curious now, as I had never even heard of manuka before EDS, and I'd like to know how they differ, aside from the names. Smile


Isn't Manuka (which I did include in the MRSA/staph synergy blend I made for my mom's sore) sometimes referred to as the "white" tea tree oil, or am I mixing it up with another oil? Regardless, Manuka and TTO are definitely different from each other -- I have both in front of me and they don't smell anything alike and the color of the oils differs, as well....

ETA: to elaborate on Avalange's post, here's more info regarding the differences b/t TT and Manuka:

Per New Directions Aromatics:
---------------------------------------------
MANUKA ESSENTIAL OIL

> Botanical Name: Leptospermum scoparium
> Plant Part: Leaves and seeds.
> Extraction Method: Steam.
> Origin: New Zealand
> Description: Manuka is one of three tea trees indigenous to both Australia and New Zealand. Manuka essential oil from The East Cape region of New Zealand has been confirmed as having the highest antimicrobial activity. There is evidence indicating that it is up to 20 times more potent than Australian tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia).
> Color: Clear with a Light yellow tone
> Common Uses: The properties are very similar to that of Tea Tree. These include antibacterial, antifungal, anti-acne, anti-inflammatory, antihistamine, and antiallergenic properties. It has practical applications on chicken pox, cold sores, insect bites and warts.
> Consistency: Medium and slightly oily
> Note: Top to Middle
> Strength of Aroma: Medium
> Blends well with: Much like Tea Tree essential oil, Manuka oil blends well with Lavandin, Lavender, Clary-sage, Rosemary, Oak moss, Pine, Cananga, Geranium, Marjoram and spice oils – particularly clove and nutmeg.
> Aromatic Scent: Manuka essential oil has a woodsy, cedar like smell that is much warmer than Tea tree.
> History: Manuka has long been valued for its healing properties by the Maori people - the indigenous people of “Aotearoa” (New Zealand ) . Infusions and poultices were made from the leaves and inner bark and the seed capsules and sap were chewed. Early European migrants produced a tea from Manuka leaves for refreshment and health. The Manuka tree also produces a nectar that the bees turn into a rich amber honey. This is also known for its curative properties.
> Cautions: None known.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TEA TREE ESSENTIAL OIL

> Botanical Name: Melaleuca alternifolia
> Plant Part: Leaves
> Extraction Method: Steam
> Origin: Australia
> Description: The Tea Tree is a small tree or shrub with needle-like leaves. It is also domestically referred to as Ti-tree. It can grow up to 7 meters (20 feet) in height and thrives in marshy areas, though it is now cultivated in plantations. The Tea Tree is very robust; it is ready for cutting only two years after its’ previous harvest.
> Color: Pale yellow to colorless
> Common Uses: Tea Tree essential oil is best known as a very powerful immune stimulant. It can help to fight all three categories of infectious organisms (Bacteria, Fungi, and Viruses), and there is evidence that Tea Tree oil massage prior to an operation may help to fortify the body and reduce post-operative shock, Used in vapor therapy, Tea Tree oil can help with colds, measles, sinusitis and viral infections. For skin and hair, Tea Tree has been used to combat acne, oily skin, head lice and dandruff. As essential oils have become more accepted by the public, the use of Tea Tree has increased significantly. This can be readily evidenced by the commercial products now using Tea Tree essential oil.
> Consistency: Thin
> Note: Middle
> Strength of Aroma: Medium to Strong
> Blends well with: Tea Tree essential oil blends particularly well with Cinnamon, Clary sage, Clove, Geranium, Lavender, Lemon, Myrrh, Nutmeg, Rosewood, Rosemary and Thyme.
> Aromatic Scent: Tee Tree essential oil has a fresh, Antiseptic and medicinal scent. It also has characteristic mint and spice back-notes.
> History: The aboriginal people of Australia have long used Tea tree oil; similarly, Tea tree has a long history of use within the field of aromatherapy. In World War Two, the producers and the cutters of Tea Tree were exempt from military service until enough essential oil had been accumulated. The oil was a highly valued product as it was issued to each soldier and sailor as part of their kit in order to treat tropical infections and infected wounds.
> Cautions: Tea Tree essential oil may cause dermal sensitization in some people. Do not take internally.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
And two more EOs that I like for MRSA/staph:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

KUNZEA ESSENTIAL OIL

> Botanical Name: Kunzea ambigua
> Plant Part: Leaves & Flowers
> Extraction Method: Steam Distillation
> Origin: Australia
> Description: Kunzea ambigua, also known as 'Tick Bush', 'Southern Spring Flower', 'White Cloud' and 'White Kunzea', is a tall shrub with abundant white or pink flowers, which grows in the coolest coastal areas of Australia (Southern New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania).
> Color: Clear, Light Yellow to Orange
> Common Uses: Kunzea ambigua is registered with the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration for the relief of symptoms of influenza, arthritis, rheumatism, muscular aches and pains, and to help relieve nervous tension, stress and mild anxiety. In skin care, Kunzea has been found to help serious skin conditions such as eczema and rashes.
> Consistency: Thin
> Note: Middle
> Strength of Aroma: It has a fragrance that is said to be refreshing, clean, stimulating and invigorating. Kunzea is one of Australia’s newest oils.
> Blends well with: Blends well with other Australian natives and with most essential oils including peppermint, lemon myrtle and lavender
> Aromatic Scent: Kunzea has a clean balsamic scent with fresh invigorating undertones. The essential oil of Kunzea ambigua has been found effective against several bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli and Candida albicans. In many cases, Kunzea ambigua has helped improve severe skin conditions such as eczema, dermatitis, ulcers and chillblains.
> History: Native animals are often found sleeping under Kunzea ambigua plants, where they seek relief from ticks and other parasites - hence the popular name of tick bush.
> Cautions: Generally non-toxic and non-sensitizing. Use well diluted. Avoid during pregnancy.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NEROLINA AUSTRALIAN

> Botanical Name: Melaleuca quinquenervia
> Plant Part: Leaves and Twigs
> Extraction Method: Steam
> Origin: Australia
> Description: Native to Australia, the Nerolina is wild harvested though plantations are being developed. It contains linalool and nerolidol, and the tree is viewed as probably the sweetest smelling of all the Tea trees. Known as the Broad Leaf Tea Tree.
> Color: Clear with a slight hint of golden orange
> Common Uses: Nerolina Australian essential oil is a valuable blending oil with the ability to 'lift' ordinary aromas with small additions to the compound. In cosmetics and perfumery, Nerolina can save a lot of money as it can be successfully used as a replacement for the top grade French lavenders (Lavandula Angustifolia). It is also reputed to be useful for relief of staph infections, shingles, allergies and bronchitis.
> Consistency: Light
> Note: Middle
> Strength of Aroma: Medium
> Blends well with: The warm, fresh, floral - camphoraceous odor of Nerolina Australian blends well with lavandin, lavender (all), clarysage, rosemary (All), oak moss, pine (All), cananga, geranium (All), marjoram (All) and spice oils – particularly clove and nutmeg.
> Aromatic Scent: A clean, mildly woody scent with distinctive lavender and lilac notes.
> History: Like Australian Niaouli, Nerolina is extracted from the leaves and twigs of a selected chemotype of the Broad-Leaved Paperbark by steam distillation. Equal parts of linalool and nerolidol give this oil very distinctive lavender and lilac notes with a clean, mildly woody aroma.
> Cautions: Nerolina Australian is Safe in terms of toxicity and skin irritancy.

Source (for all descriptions): http://www.newdirectionsaromatics.com/essential-oils-ac-c-9_25.html

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BTW, has anyone else heard that Lemon Myrtle is supposed to be a more effective germ-killer than Tea Tree?

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Sat Sep 20, 2014 4:56 am
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