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Aloe Vera Gel For Face Moisturizer

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EC413
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Mon Nov 23, 2009 4:33 pm      Reply with quote
Just wanted to ask... does anyone else use just plain Aloe Vera Gel for their face moisturizer? I've been using it everyday for the past few weeks, and noticed my skin looks great! It seems to not only glow, but the redness has been reduced, and its so soft! Of course, I also have the AALS, which helps my skin repair itself, but I swear Aloe Vera Gel is better to use than all these overly priced creams/lotions. And it's cheap! Anyone else?
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Tue Nov 24, 2009 5:29 am      Reply with quote
I have used it many times, and its great for use after sunburn, as it helps the skin heal up faster. Its also good for inflamation, cuts etc.

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Tue Nov 24, 2009 8:35 am      Reply with quote
I use it and love it for after sun, wind or any time my skin needs some extra moisture. It really works to heal any redness or inflamation.
EC413
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Tue Nov 24, 2009 8:47 am      Reply with quote
Yes, it does wonders for sunburn...

But I was talking about ALL YEAR round. I've started replacing my regular face potions with aloe... and my skin seems to look it's best ever. I was looking up on the internet, info about aloe, and its packed with vitamins and minerals all of which feed our skin. I'm going to continue using aloe...it almost the ONLY lotion that doesn't irritate my skin. And I'll say it again, 3-4 dollars for a 7 ounce supply! Cheap!
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Tue Nov 24, 2009 9:25 am      Reply with quote
You might want to read this information from other skin forums about Aloe Vera and its potential to cause glycation/AGEs:

Do you think it is feasible for Alo Vera to cause AGEs?

It is not only feasible, it certainly does happen. This is a classic example of the old adage nothing is all good or all bad. What it shows it that unless you have a wound healing problem, aloe vera is not a good thing to be using, and that it should only be used during the wound healing process. In fact, the wound healing benefit of aloe vera may well be an effect of the additional crosslinking of the collagen which makes the collagen network in the wound tougher.::

Aloe vera seems to improves wound healing and inhibits inflammation, that is why so many products contain aloe vera. The major sugar found in aloe vera is mannose-6-phosphate (M-6-P), which as been investigated as the possible anti-inflammatory agent in aloe vera..

J Am Podiatr Med Assoc 1994 Feb;84(2):77-81
Anti-inflammatory and wound healing activity of a growth substance in Aloe vera.
Davis RH, Donato JJ, Hartman GM, Haas RC
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Pennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine, Philadelphia.

Aloe vera improves wound healing and inhibits inflammation. Since mannose-6-phosphate is the major sugar in the Aloe gel, the authors examined the possibility of its being an active growth substance. Mice receiving 300 mg/kg of mannose-6-phosphate had improved wound healing over saline controls. This dose also had anti-inflammatory activity. The function of mannose-6-phosphate in A. vera is discussed.

Besides glucose, other reducing sugars, such as mannose, react with proteins to form advanced glycosylation end-products (AGEs), that are active in cross-linking collagen and elastin, the process that causes skin aging...

J Biol Chem 1992 Mar 15;267(Cool:5133-8
Immunochemical detection of advanced glycosylation end products in vivo.
Makita Z, Vlassara H, Cerami A, Bucala R
Laboratory of Medical Biochemistry, Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10021.

Reducing sugars react with protein amino groups to form a diverse group of protein-bound moieties with fluorescent and cross-linking properties. These compounds, called advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs), have been implicated in the structural and functional alterations of proteins that occur during aging and long-term diabetes. Although several AGEs have been identified on the basis of de novo synthesis and tissue isolation procedures, the measurement of AGE compounds in vivo has remained difficult. As an approach to the study of AGE formation in vivo, we prepared polyclonal antiserum to an AGE epitope(s) which forms in vitro after incubation of glucose with ribonuclease (RNase). This antiserum proved suitable for the detection of AGEs which form in vivo. Both diabetic tissue and serum known to contain elevated levels of AGEs readily competed for antibody binding. Cross-reactivity studies revealed the presence of a common AGE epitope(s) which forms after the incubation of diverse proteins with glucose. Cross-reactive epitopes also formed with glucose 6-phosphate or fructose. These data suggest that tissue AGEs which form in vivo appear to contain a common immunological epitope which cross-reacts with AGEs prepared in vitro, supporting the concept that immunologically similar AGE structures form from the incubation of sugars with different proteins (Horiuchi, S., Araki, N., and Morino, Y. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 7329-7332). None of the known AGEs, such as 4-furanyl-2-furoyl-1H-imidazole, 1-alkyl-2-formyl-3,4-diglycosylpyrrole, pyrraline, carboxymethyllysine, or pentosidine, were found to compete for binding to anti-AGE antibody. These data further suggest that the dominant AGE epitope which forms from the reaction of glucose with proteins under native conditions is immunologically distinct from the structurally defined AGEs described to date.

It has been found that phosphorylated reducing sugars are more active in glycating and cross-linking proteins than their parent molecules

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1994 Aug 30;203(1):588-93
Advanced glycation of rat liver histone octamers: an in vitro study.
Gugliucci A
Department of Anatomy, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

The question whether histones could accumulate AGE products and whether this reaction could take place even on the native histone octamer, the basic nucleosome unit, was addressed in this study. In vitro AGE formation on rat liver native histones octamers by incubation with different sugars was assessed. We provide evidence for the in vitro formation of both pentosidine and total AGE fluorescence on histone octamers in a time and sugar concentration dependent fashion. Ketoses (D-fructose and D-ribose) were more potent than aldoses. D-glucose-6-phosphate was three times as effective as D-glucose in generating AGE fluorescence. Advanced glycation of histone octamers led to the formation of cross links. For all sugars included in this study a similar pattern was observed: H2A and H3 bands disappear from electrophoretic runs.

Since aloe vera has mannose-6-phosphate as its major sugar, the M-6-P it contains would be active in the glycation of proteins and the formation of AGEs that cross-link proteins. In fact, aloe vera has been shown to increase the degree of cross-linking in collagen during wound healing..

Mol Cell Biochem 1998 Apr;181(1-2):71-6
Influence of Aloe vera on collagen characteristics in healing dermal wounds in rats.
Chithra P, Sajithlal GB, Chandrakasan G
Department of Biochemistry, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Madras, India.

Wound healing is a fundamental response to tissue injury that results in restoration of tissue integrity. This end is achieved mainly by the synthesis of the connective tissue matrix. Collagen is the major protein of the extracellular matrix, and is the component which ultimately contributes to wound strength. In this work, we report the influence of Aloe vera on the collagen content and its characteristics in a healing wound. It was observed that Aloe vera increased the collagen content of the granulation tissue as well as its degree of crosslinking as seen by increased aldehyde content and decreased acid solubility. The type I/type III collagen ratio of treated groups were lower than that of the untreated controls, indicating enhanced levels of type III collagen. Wounds were treated either by topical application or oral administration of Aloe vera to rats and both treatments were found to result in similar effects.
TreeStar
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Tue Nov 24, 2009 9:26 am      Reply with quote
I have ultra dry skin, and an occasional aloe vera treatment really perks it up. I agree it makes it glow. I also use it for cuts and burns, sunburns especially..
EC413
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Tue Nov 24, 2009 9:37 am      Reply with quote
Lisa, LOL... thanks for scaring me. So I shouldn't use it as an everyday moisturizer I suppose... that stinks! I thought I was on to something...
EC413
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Tue Nov 24, 2009 9:49 am      Reply with quote
I just tried searching...to see if Aloe does in fact promote the aging of skin.

All I found was plentiful information/sites claiming Aloe reverses skin aging, and repairs skin, I couldn't find ANYTHING warning the use of Aloe Vera.

I hate when stuff like this happens, when there is information both ways... good and bad.

But like I said, I could only find info that says Aloe is beneficial.

Here are a couple quotes from articles I just found...

"An aloe vera skin treatment using the very best skin care products is extremely effective as an anti aging treatment. And on top of that the very best natural anti aging products contain no mineral oil, no parabens or any one of dozens of other chemical ingredients that are found in many of the big name skin care products and which are considered to be potentially risky to your skin and health."

"Natural skin care products such as aloe vera skin creams and other products containing natural ingredients sourced from the fruits and nuts of plants can be extremely effective as skincare products and do not offer the same risks to your skin as you will find from the big brand-name anti aging products."

"If you want to reverse the effects of aging look no further than aloe vera. Compounds in aloe vera promote the production of collagen."

"In the 1980's scientists did a study about the beneficial effects aloe vera. They found out that compounds in aloe vera had an antiviral effect, killed cancer cells, reduced the growth rate of tumors, protected the body against free radicals, and helped with allergies."

"Aloe Vera is another alternative to anti aging creams, since the sap inside the plant has many medicinal qualities. When using raw aloe on the skin, it can actually improve the immune system and help heal dry, damaged, or sensitive skin. The aloe sap can also reduce inflammation and help wounds heal faster, while moisturizing the skin and making it much more radiant. The aloe plant is ideal for slowing down the effects aging has on the skin, and can be used to prevent the signs from occurring when used on a regular basis."



Those are all excerpts from various websites. I still cannot find info about how Aloe can be harmful.
lisacollins00
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Tue Nov 24, 2009 10:16 am      Reply with quote
There are a lot of conflicting medical studies either stating it is good, bad or of no major value:

http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all?content=10.1080/10590500600614303

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121388929/abstract

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10885091

http://www.medicine.ox.ac.uk/bandolier/booth/alternat/AT125.html

When it comes to the idea that it could possibly cause glycation and crosslinking of the skin....I would rather be cautious and take a stance of being "safe than sorry" when applying it to my skin on a daily basis.
EC413
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Tue Nov 24, 2009 12:18 pm      Reply with quote
No, I understand, and I appreciate your input.

I just don't understand how something such as Aloe, and how WIDELY it is used across the world for several several years, could be harmful.

I feel like there would be more warnings against it, if it were THAT harmful for your skin.

Maybe the store-bought aloe is considered harmful because of the additives, etc.

Maybe natural, pure aloe from the plant is the best to use?
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Tue Nov 24, 2009 2:05 pm      Reply with quote
Oh, and while researching (cuz this is driving me crazy) I found this...

"Cleopatra considered Aloe to be her 'beauty secret'...Aloe was so important to Egypt, that they even thought of Aloe as the 'plant of immortality'."

LOL, I hate reading such glorious info after hearing about this "glycation" or whatever.

Hmm, maybe others can chime in.
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Tue Nov 24, 2009 2:26 pm      Reply with quote
I just wanted to mention that Aloe can stimulate hair growth, so people with unwanted facial hair it may be a problem.

HTH

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EC413
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Tue Nov 24, 2009 2:42 pm      Reply with quote
Wow, didn't know that Sigma.

I'll apply some to my scalp, LOL.
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Wed Nov 25, 2009 7:20 am      Reply with quote
Just want to say, I have heard this before but never found any science behind it, which I figure is worth mentioning. I know several people who use it, without any hair growth results.

Re glycation, what about taking something like carnosine.
sigma wrote:
I just wanted to mention that Aloe can stimulate hair growth, so people with unwanted facial hair it may be a problem.

HTH

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Wed Nov 25, 2009 9:46 am      Reply with quote
Sean,

I can not recall where exactly I came across it, I believe it was during the lectures for professional beauticians in Europe many years ago.

I can also say that for some people it is most definitely correct - I, having the issue with fuzz, and some "unwanted" facial hair under the chin - see quite an increase in hair when I use aloe or CPs or high frequency machine. Knowing that, I am just very careful with these products.


HTH

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Wed Nov 25, 2009 10:00 am      Reply with quote
Hi Sigma

As I said before, I have heard that myself but never been able to find any science linking hair growth and aloe, but if thatís your own experience thatís fine but Iím just dubious about making that statement that this is the case for everyone and wanted to mention it as I have known some people try it for that very purpose and not get anything.

Beauticians also sometimes will tell us things during lectures that strictly arenít true - look at for example self massage on the facial areas like the eyes. I have been to many beauty lectures where they have actually scared people from doing it by saying they will stretch the skin and tissue there and end up worse off.

Its good that you got that knowledge though!

Sean
sigma wrote:
Sean,

I can not recall where exactly I came across it, I believe it was during the lectures for professional beauticians in Europe many years ago.

I can also say that for some people it is most definitely correct - I, having the issue with fuzz, and some "unwanted" facial hair under the chin - see quite an increase in hair when I use aloe or CPs or high frequency machine. Knowing that, I am just very careful with these products.


HTH

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Wed Nov 25, 2009 11:52 am      Reply with quote
Sean,

Quote:
Iím just dubious about making that statement that this is the case for everyone and wanted to mention it
Where does that come from?

I said
Quote:
I just wanted to mention that Aloe can stimulate hair growth
- I never said it would most definitely do it for all, but that the possibility exists and people have to be aware of it.

The class I attended was for medical professionals (the attend one had to have at least 2 years of education in med. field - many were M.D.), so I do have faith in the info it provided.

The experience with aloe is not unique to me - I know several others (all had issues with facial hair before) who had similar experience to mine, so regardless of the google search results I thought it was worth mentioning. I did not expect to be scolded for it though.

It is so much easier just to lurk and keep the information to yourself.

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Wed Nov 25, 2009 1:51 pm      Reply with quote
Sigma

I wasn't scolding you or making accusations of your words, I was simply stating that its not scientifically factual that it will stimulate hair growth for everyone. I know you did not say it will stimulate hair growth for everyone, but I can understand that some people may misintrepret the message to read that it will stimulate hair growth and having had friends who have followed such advice from a different source before and not had the results they were hoping, I was trying to ensure that people had different viewpoints to consider.

The possibility may very well happen for some, no argument there and wasn't saying it didn't happen for you, was simply trying to highlight that its not a guarantee.

Your not being scolded at all for it - and I truly appreciate you for speaking up on it, but just wanted to try and avoid people's disappointment if they are suffering from hair loss (like my friends were) and take to using aloe and then wonder why its not working for them. Simply it might not stimulate in hair growth for everyone thats the only point I was making.

I didn't realise there were scientific studies linking aloe and hairgrowth - my mistake.

sigma wrote:
Sean,

Quote:
Iím just dubious about making that statement that this is the case for everyone and wanted to mention it
Where does that come from?

I said
Quote:
I just wanted to mention that Aloe can stimulate hair growth
- I never said it would most definitely do it for all, but that the possibility exists and people have to be aware of it.

The class I attended was for medical professionals (the attend one had to have at least 2 years of education in med. field - many were M.D.), so I do have faith in the info it provided.

The experience with aloe is not unique to me - I know several others (all had issues with facial hair before) who had similar experience to mine, so regardless of the google search results I thought it was worth mentioning. I did not expect to be scolded for it though.

It is so much easier just to lurk and keep the information to yourself.

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Wed Nov 25, 2009 2:04 pm      Reply with quote
Sean,

no problem, just a misunderstanding.

I have never seen anyone getting hair to grow on the head with aloe, but I do not know anyone who tried either.

That may be more hormone related esp. in men, but I really have no valuable information here. I use Aloe internally and love it for wounds.

As someone who suffers with some facial hair, and is unable to tolerate electrolysis and can not do lasers (redhead) - I, perhaps, have higher awareness then most to the potential (or real) problem in that area, esp. being burned many times in the past - at one time or another I used Aloe,and CPs and high frequency and every one of these had exacerbated the condition.

HTH

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Thu Nov 26, 2009 1:00 am      Reply with quote
You wouldn't believe though how many sites out there that say aloe does promote hair, and I have had a couple of friends (male and female) who have started approaching hairloss and just jumped for the first cure.

I know people who have used Retin A and CPs and mentioned its promoted hair growth, but have never heard of it with aloe before, so its good to know.

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Thu Nov 26, 2009 7:30 am      Reply with quote
LOL @ you guys back and forth!

Either way, I will continue to use aloe. I swear my skin has improved in just the short time I have been using it. And I cant get over how cheap a bottle of it is, compared to ANY beauty product.
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Fri Nov 27, 2009 8:34 am      Reply with quote
EC413 wrote:
LOL @ you guys back and forth!

Either way, I will continue to use aloe. I swear my skin has improved in just the short time I have been using it. And I cant get over how cheap a bottle of it is, compared to ANY beauty product.




To EC413: I've used aloe vera (organic, from an Ebay seller), with a few drops of organic flax seed oil for a year now, and have had nothing but good results on my skin. I am 64 and my neck was becoming dry and red after I gave up using a moisturiser - couldn't find an affordable organic one. My neck is now a nice creamy colour and looks smooth and dewy. I use it on my face as well, sometimes overlaid with a little bit of coconut oil (well rubbed in) for extra moisture. On my forehead I use the aloe vera neat without the flax seed oil, as it seems to tighten the skin and helps to stop me frowning. Keep the raw ingredients in the fridge - this is very important to prevent deterioration.

To use the aloe vera with the flax seed oil without the mixture leaving an oily film on the skin, the trick is to experiment to get the proportions right. For myself, I almost-fill a very small plastic lid from a milk or juice carton, then I add about 5 drops of flax seed oil and mix well with a teaspoon handle. It sinks in perfectly, but others may need slightly different proportions. That amount should last about three days. Keep it in the fridge in-between uses, and stir every time before using. Although the two ingredients aren't dirt-cheap, they will last for months and months. A little goes a long way.
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Mon Dec 14, 2009 2:24 am      Reply with quote
Is aloe vera beneficial for oily skin? I read that it is good for blemishes but I'd like to know if it will curb sebum production by 'supplying moisture' as I've also read that oily skin is actually dehydrated hence the over-production of oil/sebum.
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Tue Dec 15, 2009 8:15 am      Reply with quote
newera wrote:
EC413 wrote:
LOL @ you guys back and forth!

Either way, I will continue to use aloe. I swear my skin has improved in just the short time I have been using it. And I cant get over how cheap a bottle of it is, compared to ANY beauty product.




To EC413: I've used aloe vera (organic, from an Ebay seller), with a few drops of organic flax seed oil for a year now, and have had nothing but good results on my skin. I am 64 and my neck was becoming dry and red after I gave up using a moisturiser - couldn't find an affordable organic one. My neck is now a nice creamy colour and looks smooth and dewy. I use it on my face as well, sometimes overlaid with a little bit of coconut oil (well rubbed in) for extra moisture. On my forehead I use the aloe vera neat without the flax seed oil, as it seems to tighten the skin and helps to stop me frowning. Keep the raw ingredients in the fridge - this is very important to prevent deterioration.

To use the aloe vera with the flax seed oil without the mixture leaving an oily film on the skin, the trick is to experiment to get the proportions right. For myself, I almost-fill a very small plastic lid from a milk or juice carton, then I add about 5 drops of flax seed oil and mix well with a teaspoon handle. It sinks in perfectly, but others may need slightly different proportions. That amount should last about three days. Keep it in the fridge in-between uses, and stir every time before using. Although the two ingredients aren't dirt-cheap, they will last for months and months. A little goes a long way.


Hello!

Yes, I've been mixing my Aloe Gel with pure Vitamin E oil. I put it in one of those cough medicine cups. First I add the aloe, then put in about 3 or 4 drops of the oil, mix, and apply to my face. It makes my skin look AWESOME, and I even think it's calming down the broken caps on my nose. I also ordered some EMU OIL on ebay yesterday, 9 dollars (including shipping) for 4 ounces. I'm going to mix the Emu Oil with the aloe, and start applying that. I think it'll make a great difference in my skin, but we will see.
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Tue Dec 15, 2009 2:48 pm      Reply with quote
EC413-i have actually just recently tried aloe vera and it works great! i dont have any complaints! (:
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