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what's the best moisturizer for dry acne-prone skin

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sheisha
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Thu Dec 02, 2004 7:25 pm      Reply with quote
I am in desparate need of a great moisturizer for my dry/dehyrated but still acne prone skin. The medications that I am using to controll my acne has really worked to decrease the oil in my face (which is great!) but now my face is very dry and tight feeling. I was using Decleor's Hydra Matte and loved it when my face was oily, but now it is not moisturizing enough. I then tried Olay's Total Effects, which I think caused a lot of clogged pores Mad
Any suggestions for a moisturizer that will take care of the dryness but won't make me break-out?

Thanks!
phredd4
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Thu Dec 02, 2004 9:31 pm      Reply with quote
Most moisturizers always broke me out too, or gave me many blackheads until I started using Dermalogica. The one I use the most is Dermalogica Active Moist. I love it and can't see myself ever using something else! It contains NO artificial fragrance, but it smells divine! Here is the description from EDS.

Description:
A lightweight, oil-free lotion for daily moisture protection that actively combats surface dehydration while smoothing the skin's surface with botanical extracts.

Benefits:
Provides effective skin hydration, without oils.
Smoothes skin and helps improve texture.
Absorbs quickly, leaving no greasy after-feel.

Skin Types:
Oily / Combination

Useage:
Apply over damp face and throat with light upward strokes.

Ingredients:
Silk Amino Acids help smooth and improve skin texture.
Natural botanical astringents Lemon, Ivy, Watercress and Burdock help to refine the skin.
Soothing extracts of Lavender, Mallow and Cucumber help provide deep-hydration.

Maybe you can get a sample and try it out first. I also sometimes use Dermalogica Skin Smoothing Cream which also smells great and is very hydrating but is not oil-free. Hope this helps!

-Cheri
lianne
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Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:57 pm      Reply with quote
dermalogica made me break out when I tried the active moist.

With winter here, I'm not finding my hydra-matt moisturing enough..I'm thinking of trying the decleor hydra floral fresh emolsion next..
st3rlite
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Fri Dec 03, 2004 2:31 am      Reply with quote
i never had any luck with active moist either unfortunately or most moisturisers for that matter.. everythign clogged my pores !

last time i ordered from EDS i got a sample of the MD Formulations Antioxidant Serum and have been using it every since! It hydrates really well without being overly greasy as it is a serum but I was never left dry. My skin is dehydrated as well but constantly has an oily slick and is extremely acne prone.

Really love the MD serum!
farouk
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Fri Dec 03, 2004 3:02 am      Reply with quote
I have to agree with Cheri, Active Moist is one of the very few moisturisers that have not broken me out, so give this ago.

Check out ebay for a cheap deal.

Theres also Sircuits Protective Day Moisturiser, but it does cost a fortune, but you may be interested in that too.

Mattifyers are never moisturising enough, infact theyre not moisturising at all - they just simple absorb oil.

HTH

Farouk
Mabsy
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Fri Dec 03, 2004 5:11 am      Reply with quote
Sheisha - YonKa Creme15 is the best one that I can think of. Do a search for it here, as there have been some reviews and recommendations recently, and decide if you want to give it a go. I'm not sure if it will be moisturising enough but it's certainly not drying and it is meant to help with acne. If it's not hydrating enough then perhaps incorporate a very light moisturising serum?
sheisha
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Fri Dec 03, 2004 9:50 am      Reply with quote
Thanks for all the suggestions. I did try a sample of Active Moist a while ago and remember liking it. I don't think it broke me out, so maybe I will give it a go. I have never tried Yonka Creme 15, although I have heard some great things about it. I do have Yonka Creme 93 for combination skin sitting on my shelf, but have not used it lately because I never really liked it. The texture seemed kinda waxy and didn't sink into the skin nicely. Has anyone felt this way about Creme 93?
marika
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Fri Dec 03, 2004 10:17 am      Reply with quote
The most effective moisturizer in almost every case is plain petrolatum. The more petrolatum in a product, the more effective it will be. Natural oils are not as occlusive and may actually delay barrier repair. Exceptions are for cases where pre-existing EFA deficiencies exist.

On my skin petrolatum is highly comedogenic. Using it straight almost always guarantees breakouts. I have to dilute it in a hyaluronic gel. If you want to try this, you might have to experiment to determine how much you tolerate vs how much it takes to relieve dryness. For some it might be 1 part hyaluronic gel to 1 part moisturizer and for others it might be 1 part to 10.

Hyalronic gels are very expensive but nice. Other humectant bases will do, such as glycerin in water, sorbitol in water, NaPCA in water, etc.
phredd4
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Fri Dec 03, 2004 11:54 am      Reply with quote
marika wrote:
The most effective moisturizer in almost every case is plain petrolatum. The more petrolatum in a product, the more effective it will be. Natural oils are not as occlusive and may actually delay barrier repair. Exceptions are for cases where pre-existing EFA deficiencies exist.

On my skin petrolatum is highly comedogenic. Using it straight almost always guarantees breakouts. I have to dilute it in a hyaluronic gel. If you want to try this, you might have to experiment to determine how much you tolerate vs how much it takes to relieve dryness. For some it might be 1 part hyaluronic gel to 1 part moisturizer and for others it might be 1 part to 10.

Hyalronic gels are very expensive but nice. Other humectant bases will do, such as glycerin in water, sorbitol in water, NaPCA in water, etc.


Petrolatum? Isn't that the ingredient in Vaseline?
marika
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Fri Dec 03, 2004 12:13 pm      Reply with quote
Yes. Very unglam, but highly effective. Other types and grades of petrolatum are also effective but have varying degrees of comedogenicity according to Fulton, Kligman, and others. White petrolatum might be slightly more appropriate for an acne-prone, but it isn't as easy to find.
Sassyred
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Fri Dec 03, 2004 1:32 pm      Reply with quote
Epiderm just came out with a 100% therapeutic Camellia oil. It sinks in very fast so it now can be use for daytime use not nightime. It should not clog pores or promote breakouts.

Also check out this site megazit.com Very Happy

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marika
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Fri Dec 03, 2004 2:54 pm      Reply with quote
Epiderm makes a couple of mistakes in their copy describing this oil.

"Grapefruit Seed Extract as a natural preservative."

No, the natural part is not antimicrobial. Those extracts that do have some preservative activity get it from added synthetics. (Pharmazie. 1999 Jun;54(6):452-6.)

"Sebum is the skin's natural hydrator."

Sebum is an ineffective hydrator. Kligman says it is quite useless in this respect. Other researchers say it has some moisturizing property. Probably not much.

"It is comprised of approximately 85% oleic acid triglycerides."

Not at all.

Sebum consists of
47% fatty acids, 17% wax esters, 13% ceramides, 11% squalene, 7% cholesterol, 3% triglycerides, 2% cholesterol esters. Depending on diet and genetics, the fatty acid composition may differ.

"Omega 3 fatty acids comprise up to 88% of EpiDerm Camellia Seed Oil"

I have found no source to verify this. Some sources list oleic acid as the greatest part, and other sources provide different fatty acid profiles, but none that I have found list omega3 fatty acids as a major consituent.

"EpiDerm Camellia Seed Oil has a pH of 2.8, and has nearly the same composition as sebum."

No, they are very different. All they have in common is some low percentage contributions and that they are both lipids.

If this oil is predominantly oleic acid, as many sources suggest, I would not recommend its use for oily skin. It's highly comedogenic according to a number of sources.

Sinking in is no indicator of moisturizing ability. In fact, the reverse is more generally true-- An occlusive barrier that stays put is going to bring TEWL down to a minimal level much more rapidly than a natural oil whose lipid consituents must first be metabolized by the skin cells before they can be used to repair the defective skin barrier.
Sassyred
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Fri Dec 03, 2004 3:41 pm      Reply with quote
I didn't post the fact that it sinks in faster to say it was moisturizing, I was stating this as I wasn't able to use other Camellia oils during the day prior to Epiderm's. Smile

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pbsadhaka
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Fri Dec 03, 2004 4:49 pm      Reply with quote
A wonderful moisturizer for dry, acne prone skintypes is Jojba Oil. It is a wonderful hydrator, and does not clog pores. You can either use the straight jojoba oil, or a jojoba lotion - just make sure that the other ingredients in the lotion will not break you out (emulsifiers, etc.)
marika
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Fri Dec 03, 2004 5:28 pm      Reply with quote
Composition of cosmetic grade camellia oil:

http://www.kclg.com/products/kclgcmoc.htm

oleic: 80.4% (omega9)
linoleic 8.4% (omega6)
palmitic 8.8% (saturated)
stearic 1.4% (saturated)

No appreciable omega3 content is listed. If it is present,
according to this analysis, it would be at less than 1%.

--------------------------------------

Data to evaluate the likely comedogenicity of camellia oil:

Comedogenicity of oleic acid (predominant componenent of both cameilia and olive oils):
3/3 Kligman Cutis study
3/3 Lanzet study
3/3 Norda briefs, Kligman & Mills
3/3 Almay report, fused Kligman and Fulton data

Comedogenicity of olive oil
2-3/3 Kligman Cutis
3-5/5 Almay report
0/5 Morris & Kwan

Jojoba: Fulton gives it 0-2/5
http://www.acnebook.com/articals/letstalkcosmo.html

------------------------------------------------------

Grapefruit seed extract as a preservative:

Pharmazie. 1999 Jun;54(6):452-6.
Aspects of the antimicrobial efficacy of grapefruit seed extract and its relation to preservative substances contained.

von Woedtke T, Schluter B, Pflegel P, Lindequist U, Julich WD.

Institute of Pharmacy, Ernst Moritz Arndt University, Greifswald, Germany.

The antimicrobial efficacy as well as the content of preservative agents of six commercially available grapefruit seed extracts were examined. Five of the six extracts showed a high growth inhibiting activity against the test germs Bacillus subtilis SBUG 14, Micrococcus flavus SBUG 16, Staphylococcus aureus SBUG 11, Serratia marcescens SBUG 9, Escherichia coli SBUG 17, Proteus mirabilis SBUG 47, and Candida maltosa SBUG 700. In all of the antimicrobial active grapefruit seed extracts, the preservative benzethonium chloride was detected by thin layer chromatography. Additionally, three extracts contained the preserving substances triclosan and methyl parabene. In only one of the grapefruit seed extracts tested no preservative agent was found. However, with this extract as well as with several self-made extracts from seed and juiceless pulp of grapefruits (Citrus paradisi) no antimicrobial activity could be detected (standard serial broth dilution assay, agar diffusion test). Thus, it is concluded that the potent as well as nearly universal antimicrobial activity being attributed to grapefruit seed extract is merely due to the synthetic preservative agents contained within. Natural products with antimicrobial activity do not appear to be present.

PMID: 10399191 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Eisei Shikenjo Hokoku. 1996;(114):38-42.
[Analysis of components in natural food additive "grapefruit seed extract" by HPLC and LC/MS]
[Article in Japanese]

Sakamoto S, Sato K, Maitani T, Yamada T.

The components in a commercial natural food additive "Grapefruit seed extract" and the ethanol extract of grapefruit seeds were analyzed by HPLC and LC/MS. The HPLC chromatogram of the commercial grapefruit seed extract was quite different from that of the ethanol extract of grapefruit seeds. Three main peaks were observed in the chromatogram of the commercial grapefruit seed extract. By comparison of the retention times and the absorption spectra with those of authentic samples, two peaks were ascribed to methyl-p-hydroxybenzoate and 2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxydiphenylether (triclosan). Triclosan was also identified by LC/MS by using the negative electrospray ionization method.

PMID: 9037863 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

----------------------------------------------

composition of human sebum:

Skin Pharmacol Appl Skin Physiol. 2003 May-Jun;16(3):176-87.
Palmitoleic acid isomer (C16:1delta6) in human skin sebum is effective against gram-positive bacteria.

Wille JJ, Kydonieus A.

ConvaTec, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Princeton, NJ, USA. jjwille@aol.com

The percent lipid composition of pooled human sebum analyzed by thin-layer chromatography was: ceramides (13%), fatty acid (47%), cholesterol (7%), cholesterol esters (2%), squalene (11%), triglycerides (3%), and wax esters (17%). Total sebum lipids (2- 4 mg/ml), sonicated into bacterial culture medium, caused 4- to 5-fold log reduction in growth of gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus salivarius and the anaerobe Fusobacterium nucleatum, but was ineffective against most gram-negative bacteria. Fractionation of the sebum lipids showed that both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids contained the bulk of the antimicrobial activity. Lauric acid (C12:0) was the most active saturated fatty acid. The unsaturated fatty acid, palmitoleic acid (C16:1delta6, cPA) was both the most predominant monoene and the most active antimicrobial fatty acid. Purified cPA (>99%) yielded typical minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 10-20 microg/ml against gram-positive bacteria. Organically synthesized cPA isomer gave MIC values comparable to the natural material. Both natural and synthetic cPA were found to be the most active sebum lipid fraction in blocking the adherence of a pathogenic strain of Candida albicans to porcine stratum corneum. Ethanol in combination with cPA exerts a synergistic bactericidal activity against gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Propionibacterium acnes, Escherichia coli, and several methacillin-resistant strains of S. aureus. Palmitoleic acid may be useful in topical formulations for treatment of secondary gram-positive bacterial infections, as a gram-positive bacteria antimicrobial in wound dressings, and as a natural gram-positive antimicrobial preservative in skin and hair care products. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

PMID: 12677098 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

------------------------------------------------------------

sebum as an ineffective barrier to TEWL:

J Invest Dermatol. 1987 Mar;88(3 Suppl):2s-6s.

Skin lipids: an update.

Downing DT, Stewart ME, Wertz PW, Colton SW, Abraham W, Strauss JS.

The stratum corneum lipids, responsible for the epidermal water barrier, consist principally of ceramides, cholesterol, cholesteryl sulfate, and free fatty acids. These lipids are arranged in multiple intercellular lamellae that provide an efficient water barrier because of the crystalline array of the straight and predominantly saturated lipid chains. Interlamellar linkages provided by lipids based on 30-carbon omega-hydroxyacids may be responsible for holding together the intercellular lamellae as well as for assembly of the lamellar granules of the granular cells. The normally ordered exfoliation of corneocytes as they arrive at the surface seems to require hydrolysis of the cholesteryl sulfate to free cholesterol. The sebaceous glands secrete continuously, producing sebum that consists predominantly of triglycerides, wax esters, and squalene. High rates of sebum production per sebocyte result in low levels of linoleate in the sebaceous esters, subjecting the follicular epithelium to essential fatty acid deficiency and the characteristic hyperkeratosis that results in comedo formation. Suppression of sebum production by drugs elevates sebum linoleate concentration and relieves follicular hyperkeratosis. Thus, sebum continues to be a prime suspect in the crime of acne. Low levels of sebaceous gland activity are not correlated with the occurrence of dry skin.

PMID: 2950180 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

"It remains difficult to dispel the myth that low
sebum secretion rates *cause* dry skin."

and they write that Kligman's thesis was that "the skin does not depend on sebum for maintaining a barrier to water loss," citing the example of children who produce no sebum but do not suffer from dry skin conditions.

KLIGMAN AM.
THE USES OF SEBUM.
Br J Dermatol. 1963 Aug-Sep;75:307-19. No abstract available.
PMID: 14059395 [PubMed - OLDMEDLINE for Pre1966]

"there can be no doubt of the insignificance of sebum
as a waterproofing material"

Nurs Res. 1986 Mar-Apr;35(2):98-100.
Variables associated with skin dryness in the elderly.
Frantz RA, Kinney CK, Downing DT.

This study investigated whether sebum secretion and other external variables were associated with the occurrence of dry skin in the elderly. The sample consisted of 76 elderly white individuals ranging in age from 65 to 97 years who resided in retirement homes. Dry skin was measured through verbal report and verified by observation. Sebum was collected on dacron mesh disks and measured by quantitative thin layer chromatography. Other variables pertinent to the occurrence of dry skin were measured through structured interview. Dry skin was found in 59% of the subjects. Mean sebum secretion rate was .534 mg/10 sq cm/3 hr. Although sebum secretion rate was significantly lower in females than in males, p less than .001, sebum levels did not differ significantly as a function of dry skin for either sex. A significant association was found between severity of skin dryness and age, p less than .02. The findings refute the widely held, though untested belief, that the decreased sebaceous gland activity that accompanies aging is responsible for skin dryness in the elderly.

PMID: 3633513 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

---------------------------------------------------------

natural plant oils as moisturizers compared to petrolatum:

Petrolatum is probably the most effective moisturizer there is:

Acta Derm Venereol. 2000 Nov-Dec;80(6):412-5.

Skin-identical lipids versus petrolatum in the treatment of tape-stripped and detergent-perturbed human skin.

Loden M, Barany E.

ACO Hud AB, Upplands Vasby, Sweden. marie.loden@acohud.se

The cutaneous permeability barrier is localized to the stratum corneum interstices and is mediated by lamellar bilayers enriched in cholesterol, free fatty acids and ceramides. Topically applied lipids may interfere with the skin barrier function and formulations containing "skin-identical lipids" have been suggested to facilitate normalization of damaged skin. The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of "skin-identical lipids" in a petrolatum-rich cream base and pure petrolatum to facilitate barrier repair in detergent- and tape-stripped-perturbed human skin. Barrier recovery and inflammation were instrumentally monitored for 14 days as transepidermal water loss and skin blood flow, using an Evaporimeter and a laser Doppler flowmeter, respectively. Treatment with the 2 different products gave no indication that "skin-identical lipids" in a cream base are more efficient than pure petrolatum at promoting normalization in either of the 2 experimentally perturbed areas. This finding may support the hypothesis that different types of skin abnormality should be treated according to the underlying damage.

Publication Types:
Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial

PMID: 11243632 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

http://www.postgradmed.com/issues/1997/08_97/kligman.htm

The best natural choice seems to be a combination of higher content of linoleic acid and lower content of oleic acid but even this is a poor performer compared to plain petrolatum:

http://www.scf-online.com/english/31_e/Images31_e/b_gabard31_fig4_big_e.gif
Sassyred
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Fri Dec 03, 2004 6:58 pm      Reply with quote
Well I had posted (apparently it was edited?) all are welcome to call Epiderm 1-303-531-5091 and ask any questions they may have regarding their Camellia Oil, this is NOT my phone number btw, it is corporates.

pbsadhaka - I also like/use Jojoba oil! I started to use it to remove my eye makeup and found it a great nightime moisturizer. Also for me it helps if I have any hormonal breakouts to heal faster or if I have cysts/lumps it brings them to a head! Very Happy

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mailnat
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Tue Dec 07, 2004 2:40 pm      Reply with quote
Sounds like you and I have the same skin type which is awfully hard to find a moisturiser that isn't too rich/heavy that'll cause breakouts or too light to leave yoor skin dry.I've tried Dermalogica but found active moist a bit light and the skin smoothing cream a bit heavy. I'm currently using estee Lauder day wear plus which is keeping everything in check but am looking at the Yonka range which always gets the best reviews!
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Wed Dec 08, 2004 3:44 pm      Reply with quote
mailnat wrote:
Sounds like you and I have the same skin type which is awfully hard to find a moisturiser that isn't too rich/heavy that'll cause breakouts or too light to leave yoor skin dry.I've tried Dermalogica but found active moist a bit light and the skin smoothing cream a bit heavy. I'm currently using estee Lauder day wear plus which is keeping everything in check but am looking at the Yonka range which always gets the best reviews!


I have the same problem with my skin. I live in Houston so the humidity helps. During those humid months I use Decleor Hydramat (the product that started this thread) I did find that when the weather changes, my face dries up and I break out. I presented this problem when I went to purchase some product I had run out of and the Decleor specialist recommended I changed to their Harmony line during the winter. She gave me some samples that I have been using for the past week and my skin is back to normal and feels very smooth. The breakouts went away. ('Very Happy')
Very Happy
lianne
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Thu Dec 09, 2004 12:16 am      Reply with quote
cinnamoni,

I have been having that same problem the last couple months..maybe I will try the harmonie line now too!!
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