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"Science" behind copper peptides

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rileygirl
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Sat Jan 01, 2011 6:44 pm      Reply with quote
If anyone is interested the skincaretalk forum is having a discussion on Dr. Pickart and his theory on hyaluronic acid/overwetting the skin. Interesting reading.

http://www.skincaretalk.com/anti-aging/19355-ideas-dr-pickart.html
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Sat Jan 01, 2011 7:29 pm      Reply with quote
rileygirl wrote:
If anyone is interested the skincaretalk forum is having a discussion on Dr. Pickart and his theory on hyaluronic acid/overwetting the skin. Interesting reading.

http://www.skincaretalk.com/anti-aging/19355-ideas-dr-pickart.html


Very interesting indeed, Thanks for posting Riley. Smile

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Wed Jan 05, 2011 7:00 am      Reply with quote
How is the general consumer supposed to figure out what is safe for the skin when even the supposed "experts" can't agree? HA is prevalent in many skin care lines these days and is touted as one of the "big guns" in anti-aging but, of course, Dr Pickart claims that it is a no-no. But then Dr Pickart includes DMAE in his serums, a product that seems to have many detractors. I find all of this very frustrating - you're either damned if you do or damned if you don't.

And what was with Dr Pickart's reply to the poster who claimed her relatives had great skin in their 80s and 90s even though they only used cold-cream. Dr P replied, "Maybe your relatives had beautiful skin late in life but I have never seen a woman in her 80s or 90s that had the beautiful skin of a 17 year old".
Seems like a ridiculous thing to say, what point is he trying to make? Who expects to look 17 when you're 80? Surely, not even CPs can achieve that.

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Wed Jan 05, 2011 7:29 am      Reply with quote
I use cp's and read on the SB site all the time.

Dr. Pickart responds to many posts, which is nice that he is so hands on. But some of his responses can be a bit short and sometimes odd.

I just tell myself that he is a scientist, with perhaps a quirky personality. Could be too much time in the lab -- and his ability to communicate in this type of medium is not the best.

But I can relate to you point; it can shake one's confidence if you get to know any doctor too well and realize they're flawed human beings. I think we all want a dr. oz!

When it comes to HA? I want to see other supporting opinions and I won't take his at face value. I think Pickart knows cp's inside and out..that is his expertise. I think for any of us to believe one single scientist or doctor would be foolish.

I also say go with your gut..I think sometimes our instincts can tell us when some product or thing is just not right. (not very scientific..but all we have sometimes).
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Mon Jan 31, 2011 12:04 am      Reply with quote
More interesting and heated discussion on the second generation copper peptides. Don't shoot the messanger/poster?

http://forum.owndoc.com/showthread.php?181-Copper-peptides/page4

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Mon Jan 31, 2011 8:54 pm      Reply with quote
hotdocgirl wrote:

But some of his responses can be a bit short and sometimes odd. I just tell myself that he is a scientist, with perhaps a quirky personality. Could be too much time in the lab -- and his ability to communicate in this type of medium is not the best. But I can relate to you point; it can shake one's confidence if you get to know any doctor too well and realize they're flawed human beings.


I just ended my second relationship with a doctor. I thought the first one was a fluke but I've come to realize that most doctors are strange, at least in personal relationships. You'd think dealing with people all day would make them more capable of sensitivity and communication, not less. Dr. Oz seems to be the exception but no one knows for sure what someone's marriage is like.

I'm sticking to lawyers and CPAs from now on!
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Mon Jan 31, 2011 9:16 pm      Reply with quote
There is more to that story than you told..dying to know about these dr. strangeloves!
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Mon Jul 04, 2011 4:28 pm      Reply with quote
Not sure if anyone is interested in this still, but I found this reading the Skinbiology forum. It seems to me that the GHK is the "preferred" CP.

There is now a huge, very huge amount of data on the human blood peptide GHK that was developed by the Broad Institute. Since GHK grab copper quickly in the body, it is likely that most, if not all of the GHK effects are due to copper.

This should help explain the role of copper in the body. My prime goals are to make some better skin products and write a book for researchers on GHK effects. Skin Biology funds the work on the research book.

I have posted this before, but this again is where we are at in understanding copper peptides.

1. GHK and Aging

My studies on the differences in the support of cultured cells between blood plasma from young and old humans led to my discovery of the copper binding tripeptide Gly-His-Lys or GHK. Over 80 laboratories have published studies on GHK. References are at http://reverseskinaging.com/co...de-regeneration.html.

GHK has regenerative actions on many tissues and organs (skin, hair follicles, stomach lining, intestinal lining, bone tissue), suppresses inflammatory proteins and increases anti-inflammatory proteins, increases infection resistance, suppresses many cancer metastasis genes, plus other positive effects. GHK's actions are precisely opposite to the malevolent conditions that arise during human aging.

Because of the diverse and health-positive actions of GHK, it has been studied by the Broad Institute (Harvard and MIT) which determines a molecule's actions on all the human genes and the molecule's binding to other biological molecules. GHK controls or effects about 16% of human genes based on Broad Institute databases. www.broadinstitue.org. GHK appears to control 435 "over-expressed" genes. Iorio et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 2010 107: 1462-14626 Supplemental Material.

2. Problems of Aging

The four major problems of aging are:

- Lack of organ repair and renewal: GHK increases regeneration of skin, hair follicles, bone tissue, gastric lining, and intestinal lining. It increases protein synthesis of collagen, elastin, metalloproteinases, anti-proteases, angiogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 2, nerve outgrowth, nerve growth factor, neutrotropins 3 and 4, and erythropoietin; chemoattracts of repair cells such as macrophages, mast cells, capillary cells.

- Inflammations (heart disease, kidney disease, etc.): GHK suppresses inflammatory cytokines (TGF-beta-1, TNF alpha, Interleukin-1) while increasing antioxidants superoxide dismutase and decorin.

- Increased infections: GHK suppresses bacterial infections in mice. A testing lab (Panlabs) found that GHK suppresses infection during safety studies at Procyte in 1989. Panlabs is now part of another company. Then a group at Aristotle Univ. in Greece rediscovered these anti-infection actions in 1999.

- Increased cancer: GHK topped the list of 1,309 compounds tested at the Broad Institute for the suppression of genes overexpressed in aggressive, metastatic human colon cancer. Linus Pauling published a paper in 1983 finding that a very similar copper peptide (Gly-Gly-His:copper 2+) plus vitamin C suppressed cancer growth in mice.
In April, I presented information on the links between skin remodeling agents and the suppression of cancer metastasis genes at Wound Healing Society and the Society for the Advancement of Wound Care. This was very well received and produced new collaborations with other scientists working on skin regeneration. This can be viewed at http://reverseskinaging.com/wo...ng-society-2011.html

3. Source of GHK

GHK is generated from extracellular matrix proteins during tissue damage or normal tissue replacement. GHK has an extraordinary affinity for copper 2+ and can obtain copper 2+ from albumin and form GHK-Cu. In human blood, it exists as GHK-Cu (gly-his-lys:copper 2+) .

The copper peptides work on the late stage of skin repair. That is, they remove older tissue and replace it with normal tissue in a process called tissue remodeling.

4. Effects of GHK on cells and proteins

4.1 Chemoattractant of repair cells such as macrophages, mast cells, capillary cells.

4.2 Increases fibroblasts, keratinocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, angiogenesis, hair follicle size, nerve outgrowth.

4.2 Anti-inflammatory actions: suppression of oxygen free radicals, reactive carbonyl species, thromboxane formation, release of oxidizing iron, transforming growth factor beta-1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, protein glycation, blocks ultraviolet damage to skin keratinocytes but increases superoxide dismutase, decorin, vessel vasodilation, improves fibroblast recovery after X-ray treatments, protects hepatic tissue from tetrachloromethane poisoning.

4.3 Increases protein synthesis of collagen, elastin, metalloproteinases, anti-proteases, vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 2, nerve growth factor, neutrotropins 3 and and erythropoietin.

4. Effects of GHK on tissues

4.1 Effects of GHK on intact human skin (women of age 50-59)

Tightens loose skin & thicken older skin, reduces fine lines & depth of wrinkle, reduces spots, photodamage & hyperpigmentation, smooths rough skin, improve overall facial appearance, increases skin collagen. (studies from Dermatology departments at Univ. of Pennsylvania, UCSF, and Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey)

4.2 Effects of GHK on other tissues

Increases wound healing in humans, mice, rats, pigs. Increase hair follicle size, hair growth, and hair transplant success. Heals stomach ulcers, development, intestinal ulcers and bone tissue

5. Repair damaged DNA

Restores normal fibroblast replication after X-ray damage (Stanford University).

6. Adult Epithelial Stem Cell Activation

GHK-Cu increases protein p63, integrins, and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) while increasing keratinocyte replication. The primary cause of human aging is a decline in organ function with time. Up to about age 20, tissue and organs are maintained in a very functional and healthy state. But with aging, repair slows and in time human organs fail to fulfill their biological role. Adult stem cells in organs create new cells for repair and the key protein in activating and supporting stem cell function appears to be protein P63. Without adequate P63, skin ages rapidly as do other tissue of the body. (Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University) Arch Dermatol Res. 2009 Apr;301(4):301-6. Epub 2009 Mar 25.

7. Protects Keratinocytes from UV Damage

GHK protects cultured keratinocytes from lethal UV radiation. Inter. J. Cosm. Sci. 27, 271-278 (2005) (Univ. of Milan and Barcelona Bioinorganic Institute).

8. Breaking the "Hayflick Limit".

The Hayflick Limit asserts that normal human cells can replicate for only about 40 generations before they become senescent or cancerous. GHK is one of six growth factors (GHK, insulin, thyrotropin, transferrin, hydrocortisone, somatostatin) used to culture normal human adult thyroid cells. In this system, the cells have been cultured over 200 generations without becoming senescent or cancerous. Ambesi-Impiombato et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1980 Jun;77(6):3455-9.

9. New results from the Broad Institute Chem Bank

GHK has been tested on about 270 proteins, enzymes, and cellular systems. We only looked at the top 8.

1. GHK's highest activity in the Broad Institute Chem Bank is inhibiting human histone deacetylase or HDAC. GHK inhibits HDAC based on its very strong binding to HDAC and its gene actions.

Such inhibitors seem to kill cancer cells but not normal cells. Also kill cells with latent HIV. Also have anti-Alzheimer actions.

Some such inhibitors cause cell senescence while others do the opposite. Since GHK has been used to "Break the Hayflick Limit" as a ingredient in the long term cell culture (over 200 generations or 5-times the Hayflick Limit) of normal rat adult thyroid cells, it is obviously not a senescence factor.

During aging, many genes are silenced and stop producing proteins. Young DNA is rather open so that proteins can be made. During aging, HDACs cause a tightening of the DNA strands by removing acetyl groups from DNA which silences the DNA. Inhibitors of HDAC increase acetyl groups on the DNA thus producing more proteins like younger DNA.

HDAC inhibitors such as Vorinostat and Trichostatin suppress many types of cancers. Such inhibitors as have in vivo effects against latently HIV infected T-cells. This means it might be possible to remove the virus from in HIV infected cells.

2. A brief look at other effects based on the first 8 of the 270 tests.

It appears that GHK strongly inhibits proteins causing aging itself plus the problems of cancer, arthritis, HIV, HIV nerve damage, psychiatric disease, malaria, immune suppression for transplantations, and Alzheimers. Every one of the proteins that GHK affects is the object of intense research by drug companies.

It also inhibits the Wnt pathway, a signalling system involved in embryogenesis and in many other processes in living cells, has been implicated in many cancers,

And we have just touched the surface of this data.
..........
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Mon Jul 04, 2011 9:01 pm      Reply with quote
This info came out in the most recent email-newsletter from Skin Biology. They've been discussing this on the forum for months.
Dr. P has been doing a lot of research on cancer and copper. Star Model told us this a long ways back and this is the outcome in a nutshell

rileygirl wrote:
Not sure if anyone is interested in this still, but I found this reading the Skinbiology forum. It seems to me that the GHK is the "preferred" CP.


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Tue Jul 05, 2011 6:17 am      Reply with quote
It sounds to me that a lot of the "usage" is talking about internal (prevention of cancer, etc., etc). Interesting stuff, but not sure how this relates to skin care.
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Tue Jul 05, 2011 4:52 pm      Reply with quote
rileygirl wrote:
It sounds to me that a lot of the "usage" is talking about internal (prevention of cancer, etc., etc). Interesting stuff, but not sure how this relates to skin care.


Actually I find it relates directly to it's value on the skin - and it is found all through the abstract.

Just a few examples:

"GHK has regenerative actions on many tissues and organs (skin, hair follicles, stomach lining, intestinal lining, bone tissue), suppresses inflammatory proteins and increases anti-inflammatory proteins, increases infection resistance, suppresses many cancer metastasis genes, plus other positive effects. GHK's actions are precisely opposite to the malevolent conditions that arise during human aging.

In April, I presented information on the links between skin remodeling agents and the suppression of cancer metastasis genes at Wound Healing Society and the Society for the Advancement of Wound Care. This was very well received and produced new collaborations with other scientists working on skin regeneration. This can be viewed at http://reverseskinaging.com/wo...ng-society-2011.html


I love CP's almost as much as I love ASG and Diamond Laughing

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Wed Jul 06, 2011 4:15 pm      Reply with quote
So what is the conclusion? Which is better -- 1st generation or 2nd generation? I fell asleep reading the scientific jargon. Confused
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Wed Jul 06, 2011 6:24 pm      Reply with quote
SoftSkin wrote:
So what is the conclusion? Which is better -- 1st generation or 2nd generation? I fell asleep reading the scientific jargon. Confused


The scientific jargon can be a bit much to take in all at once. Sometimes its better to assimilate it a tiny bit at a time. Wink

Dr Pickart has always said the 2nd generation is 'better' than the 1st gen (GHK). He designed the 2nd gen because the 1st gen was fragile and could break down when exposed to certain acids. The 2nd gen CPs can handle the exposure to acids and actually work well WITH them.

Its probably just best to try each one to see which one works best for YOU. The sample sizes Skin Bio offers are a good way to try different ones and they have combo packages too.

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Wed Jul 06, 2011 9:06 pm      Reply with quote
foxe wrote:
SoftSkin wrote:
So what is the conclusion? Which is better -- 1st generation or 2nd generation? I fell asleep reading the scientific jargon. Confused


The scientific jargon can be a bit much to take in all at once. Sometimes its better to assimilate it a tiny bit at a time. Wink

Dr Pickart has always said the 2nd generation is 'better' than the 1st gen (GHK). He designed the 2nd gen because the 1st gen was fragile and could break down when exposed to certain acids. The 2nd gen CPs can handle the exposure to acids and actually work well WITH them.

Its probably just best to try each one to see which one works best for YOU. The sample sizes Skin Bio offers are a good way to try different ones and they have combo packages too.


The sample program is wonderful.

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Thu Jul 07, 2011 5:53 am      Reply with quote
foxe wrote:


Dr Pickart has always said the 2nd generation is 'better' than the 1st gen (GHK).


I am actually starting to doubt that he feels this way. It seems to me from all the research, studies, conferences, etc. are all geared to the benefits of the GHK.

LOL. Well, never mind what I just said. I just read this on the Skinbio site!!

"We are focusing on the 2nd generation copper peptides for skin products because they have stronger actions on skin rebuilding than GHK. But since GHK is in the human body, there is more research on GHK to help understand the mechanisms of tissue repair in humans."
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Thu Jul 07, 2011 6:45 am      Reply with quote
rileygirl wrote:
foxe wrote:


Dr Pickart has always said the 2nd generation is 'better' than the 1st gen (GHK).


I am actually starting to doubt that he feels this way. It seems to me from all the research, studies, conferences, etc. are all geared to the benefits of the GHK.

LOL. Well, never mind what I just said. I just read this on the Skinbio site!!

"We are focusing on the 2nd generation copper peptides for skin products because they have stronger actions on skin rebuilding than GHK. But since GHK is in the human body, there is more research on GHK to help understand the mechanisms of tissue repair in humans."


Well I agree with your initial statement in that GHK 1st gen. CPs have all the studies done on them by the scientific community, where the 2nd gen. only SkinBio have any studies unpublished and not peer reviewed.

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Fri Mar 16, 2012 7:47 am      Reply with quote
Omg, look at this
http://reverseskinaging.com/essentialdayspa-forum-copper.html

they mention Josee!
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Fri Mar 16, 2012 7:54 am      Reply with quote
HamCheeseSandwich wrote:
Omg, look at this
http://reverseskinaging.com/essentialdayspa-forum-copper.html

they mention Josee!


Yes that was sadly posted a very long time ago, not SkinBio's finest moment IMO.

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Thu Mar 22, 2012 12:47 pm      Reply with quote
Clearly diseased minds
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Fri Mar 23, 2012 2:41 pm      Reply with quote
dogstar wrote:
Clearly diseased minds


Chronic occupational copper exposure. It has been suggested that some of the effects of aging may be associated with excess copper. In addition, studies have found that people with mental illnesses such as schizophrenia had heightened levels of copper in their systems. Elevated free copper levels exist in Alzheimer’s disease.
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Fri Mar 23, 2012 3:03 pm      Reply with quote
DrJ wrote:
dogstar wrote:
Clearly diseased minds


Chronic occupational copper exposure. It has been suggested that some of the effects of aging may be associated with excess copper. In addition, studies have found that people with mental illnesses such as schizophrenia had heightened levels of copper in their systems. Elevated free copper levels exist in Alzheimer’s disease.


Dr. Pickart would beg to differ with that opinion. He has said this about it on his website:

"Copper was postulated on the basis of a few simple studies to be a possible factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

However, newer, more careful studies, have concluded that copper reduces the development of the disease."


http://www.reverseskinaging.com/copper5.html

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Fri Mar 23, 2012 3:20 pm      Reply with quote
foxe wrote:
DrJ wrote:
dogstar wrote:
Clearly diseased minds


Chronic occupational copper exposure. It has been suggested that some of the effects of aging may be associated with excess copper. In addition, studies have found that people with mental illnesses such as schizophrenia had heightened levels of copper in their systems. Elevated free copper levels exist in Alzheimer’s disease.


Dr. Pickart would beg to differ with that opinion. He has said this about it on his website:

"Copper was postulated on the basis of a few simple studies to be a possible factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

However, newer, more careful studies, have concluded that copper reduces the development of the disease."


http://www.reverseskinaging.com/copper5.html


There seems to be conflicting opinions within the scientific community (as usual).

Meanwhile, copper has also been getting a lot of attention from Alzheimer’s researchers. Over the past decade, the role of copper in Alzheimer’s disease has also been extensively explored, yet two conclusions are being drawn which only serve to cloud our understanding. The continuing exploration of the interesting relationship between copper and Alzheimer’s disease will hopefully yield an important breakthrough in the near future.
Two recent studies, one by Exley and another by Jiang, both seem to point to the conclusion that copper reduces plaque build-up in the brain. This plaque is more specifically a clumping of the amyloid beta, a peptide present in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. An earlier study from the Department of Psychiatry at the Saarland University Medical Center found lower levels of copper in post-mortem Alzheimer’s patients. Another study, by Bayer and Multhaup, found a positive correlation between copper levels and scores on an Alzheimer’s specific cognitive processing test. All these data might suggest that there is a relationship between copper deficiency and Alzheimer’s disease, but it is too soon to jump to that conclusion.
While the above studies seem to point to copper as a possible light at the end of the dark tunnel of Alzheimer’s Disease, there is a school of thought among other scientists that claims copper may be the cause of this darkness, not its remedy. The University of Rochester Medical Center’s research team describes how copper damages LRP, or low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. LRP seems to be responsible for removing amyloid beta from the brain. If copper damages the LRP molecules, the result is the build up of amyloid beta plaque in the brain. Zlokovic performed a study testing the effects of copper on mice. The results are as follows: After ten weeks, the rats that were given water with copper had twice as much copper in their brains’ blood vessel cells and one third more amyloid beta than that of the control group. A similar study in 2003 on rabbits yielded strikingly similar results.
Until someone can put the pieces of this copper puzzle together, it is too soon to tell whether copper is a help or a hindrance in avoiding Alzheimer’s.

http://intro2psych.wordpress.com/2010/03/26/alzheimers-sleep-and-copper/

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Fri Mar 23, 2012 4:38 pm      Reply with quote
DarkMoon wrote:
foxe wrote:
DrJ wrote:
dogstar wrote:
Clearly diseased minds


Chronic occupational copper exposure. It has been suggested that some of the effects of aging may be associated with excess copper. In addition, studies have found that people with mental illnesses such as schizophrenia had heightened levels of copper in their systems. Elevated free copper levels exist in Alzheimer’s disease.


Dr. Pickart would beg to differ with that opinion. He has said this about it on his website:

"Copper was postulated on the basis of a few simple studies to be a possible factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

However, newer, more careful studies, have concluded that copper reduces the development of the disease."


http://www.reverseskinaging.com/copper5.html


There seems to be conflicting opinions within the scientific community (as usual).

Meanwhile, copper has also been getting a lot of attention from Alzheimer’s researchers. Over the past decade, the role of copper in Alzheimer’s disease has also been extensively explored, yet two conclusions are being drawn which only serve to cloud our understanding. The continuing exploration of the interesting relationship between copper and Alzheimer’s disease will hopefully yield an important breakthrough in the near future.
Two recent studies, one by Exley and another by Jiang, both seem to point to the conclusion that copper reduces plaque build-up in the brain. This plaque is more specifically a clumping of the amyloid beta, a peptide present in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. An earlier study from the Department of Psychiatry at the Saarland University Medical Center found lower levels of copper in post-mortem Alzheimer’s patients. Another study, by Bayer and Multhaup, found a positive correlation between copper levels and scores on an Alzheimer’s specific cognitive processing test. All these data might suggest that there is a relationship between copper deficiency and Alzheimer’s disease, but it is too soon to jump to that conclusion.
While the above studies seem to point to copper as a possible light at the end of the dark tunnel of Alzheimer’s Disease, there is a school of thought among other scientists that claims copper may be the cause of this darkness, not its remedy. The University of Rochester Medical Center’s research team describes how copper damages LRP, or low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. LRP seems to be responsible for removing amyloid beta from the brain. If copper damages the LRP molecules, the result is the build up of amyloid beta plaque in the brain. Zlokovic performed a study testing the effects of copper on mice. The results are as follows: After ten weeks, the rats that were given water with copper had twice as much copper in their brains’ blood vessel cells and one third more amyloid beta than that of the control group. A similar study in 2003 on rabbits yielded strikingly similar results.
Until someone can put the pieces of this copper puzzle together, it is too soon to tell whether copper is a help or a hindrance in avoiding Alzheimer’s.

http://intro2psych.wordpress.com/2010/03/26/alzheimers-sleep-and-copper/


Still haven't ruled out schizophrenia
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Fri Mar 23, 2012 6:36 pm      Reply with quote
DrJ wrote:
DarkMoon wrote:
foxe wrote:
DrJ wrote:
dogstar wrote:
Clearly diseased minds


Chronic occupational copper exposure. It has been suggested that some of the effects of aging may be associated with excess copper. In addition, studies have found that people with mental illnesses such as schizophrenia had heightened levels of copper in their systems. Elevated free copper levels exist in Alzheimer’s disease.


Dr. Pickart would beg to differ with that opinion. He has said this about it on his website:

"Copper was postulated on the basis of a few simple studies to be a possible factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

However, newer, more careful studies, have concluded that copper reduces the development of the disease."


http://www.reverseskinaging.com/copper5.html


There seems to be conflicting opinions within the scientific community (as usual).

Meanwhile, copper has also been getting a lot of attention from Alzheimer’s researchers. Over the past decade, the role of copper in Alzheimer’s disease has also been extensively explored, yet two conclusions are being drawn which only serve to cloud our understanding. The continuing exploration of the interesting relationship between copper and Alzheimer’s disease will hopefully yield an important breakthrough in the near future.
Two recent studies, one by Exley and another by Jiang, both seem to point to the conclusion that copper reduces plaque build-up in the brain. This plaque is more specifically a clumping of the amyloid beta, a peptide present in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. An earlier study from the Department of Psychiatry at the Saarland University Medical Center found lower levels of copper in post-mortem Alzheimer’s patients. Another study, by Bayer and Multhaup, found a positive correlation between copper levels and scores on an Alzheimer’s specific cognitive processing test. All these data might suggest that there is a relationship between copper deficiency and Alzheimer’s disease, but it is too soon to jump to that conclusion.
While the above studies seem to point to copper as a possible light at the end of the dark tunnel of Alzheimer’s Disease, there is a school of thought among other scientists that claims copper may be the cause of this darkness, not its remedy. The University of Rochester Medical Center’s research team describes how copper damages LRP, or low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. LRP seems to be responsible for removing amyloid beta from the brain. If copper damages the LRP molecules, the result is the build up of amyloid beta plaque in the brain. Zlokovic performed a study testing the effects of copper on mice. The results are as follows: After ten weeks, the rats that were given water with copper had twice as much copper in their brains’ blood vessel cells and one third more amyloid beta than that of the control group. A similar study in 2003 on rabbits yielded strikingly similar results.
Until someone can put the pieces of this copper puzzle together, it is too soon to tell whether copper is a help or a hindrance in avoiding Alzheimer’s.

http://intro2psych.wordpress.com/2010/03/26/alzheimers-sleep-and-copper/


Still haven't ruled out schizophrenia


From what I read it didn't rule out Alzheimer’s either, I really don't want a page over there devoted to me, I am just posting what I have read where Alzheimer’s is concerned.
BTW Josee who started this thread is a teaching OB/GYN at a large university. Shock

http://reverseskinaging.com/essentialdayspa-forum-copper.html

There is another thread on SkinBio web site forum dedicated to the ignorant EDS members that questioned the science on this thread.

http://healthyskin.infopop.cc/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/5220011852/m/703105925

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Wed Mar 28, 2012 12:46 pm      Reply with quote
I inherently don't trust anyone who, upon being questioned or disagreed with, counters with " they" are trolls, ignorant, etc..
Yes, Josse is a practicing M.D.
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