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Let's Make a List / Name That Fantastic Active

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DrJ
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Sun Mar 25, 2012 2:54 pm      Reply with quote
jom wrote:
Chantecaille charges a pretty penny for their nano gold products

http://www.neimanmarcus.com/search.jsp?N=0&Ntt=nano+gold&_requestid=27037


Methinks their markup is a tad high. What do they think they are selling ... stem cell cytokines?

(it takes a lot more to obtain, nurture, text, retest, cultivate, passage, induce, extract, filter, nono-ize, etc cytokines than it does to find and extract gold.)

I'm betting there is < $4.50 worth of gold in that $450 jar of cream.
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Sun Mar 25, 2012 2:57 pm      Reply with quote
DrJ wrote:
jom wrote:
Chantecaille charges a pretty penny for their nano gold products

http://www.neimanmarcus.com/search.jsp?N=0&Ntt=nano+gold&_requestid=27037


Methinks their markup is a tad high. What do they think they are selling ... stem cell cytokines?

(it takes a lot more to obtain, nurture, text, retest, cultivate, passage, induce, extract, filter, nono-ize, etc cytokines than it does to find and extract gold.)

I'm betting there is < $4.50 worth of gold in that $450 jar of cream.


Oh no, is that an omen for what we can expect price wise from your product?
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Sun Mar 25, 2012 9:03 pm      Reply with quote
DragoN wrote:

Spinach Mitochondria, or any plant derivative thereof, applied topically....what can you "dig up" on that "active?"


You may have run across this previously, but Skinactives has a couple of plant mitochondria based items.

http://www.skinactives.com/Mitochondria-Concentrate.html

I thought I'd read previously that these were based on cauliflower mitochondria.
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Tue Apr 10, 2012 5:15 pm      Reply with quote
My 'fantastic new actives' are "plant extracts", specifically White Tea; (well not exactly new for me, I've been loving/using white tea for a while.) Preventing destruction to collagen & elastin should be a goal for all.. It's never too late to start, but boy do I wish I were 30 or 40 again..

Anti-elastase activities were observed for nine of the extracts with inhibitory activity in the following order: white tea (~89%), cleavers (~58%), burdock root (~51%), bladderwrack (~50%), anise and angelica (~32%). Anti-collagenase activities were exhibited by sixteen plants of which the highest activity was seen in white tea (~87%), green tea (~47%), rose tincture (~41%), and lavender (~31%). Nine plant extracts had activities against both elastase (E) and collagenase (C) and were ranked in the order of white tea (E:89%, C:87%) > bladderwrack (E:50%, C:25%) > cleavers (E:58%, C:7%) > rose tincture (E:22%, C:41%) > green tea (E:10%: C:47%) > rose aqueous (E: 24%, C:26%) > angelica (E:32%, C:17%) > anise (E:32%, C:6%) > pomegranate (E:15%, C:11%).

Read all about it here;

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/9/27

I'm working on a nice water based serum to use alone or in conjunction with LED treatments, but for those of you who DIY and can't wait, you can find a bunch of these great extracts @

http://www.theherbarie.com/White-Peony-Tea-Extract--pr-23.html

If any other DIY junkies give it a go maybe we can start a thread to share ideas..Wink

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Tue Apr 10, 2012 5:33 pm      Reply with quote
Kassy_A wrote:
My 'fantastic new actives' are "plant extracts", specifically White Tea; (well not exactly new for me, I've been loving/using white tea for a while.) Preventing destruction to collagen & elastin should be a goal for all.. It's never too late to start, but boy do I wish I were 30 or 40 again..

Anti-elastase activities were observed for nine of the extracts with inhibitory activity in the following order: white tea (~89%), cleavers (~58%), burdock root (~51%), bladderwrack (~50%), anise and angelica (~32%). Anti-collagenase activities were exhibited by sixteen plants of which the highest activity was seen in white tea (~87%), green tea (~47%), rose tincture (~41%), and lavender (~31%). Nine plant extracts had activities against both elastase (E) and collagenase (C) and were ranked in the order of white tea (E:89%, C:87%) > bladderwrack (E:50%, C:25%) > cleavers (E:58%, C:7%) > rose tincture (E:22%, C:41%) > green tea (E:10%: C:47%) > rose aqueous (E: 24%, C:26%) > angelica (E:32%, C:17%) > anise (E:32%, C:6%) > pomegranate (E:15%, C:11%).

Read all about it here;

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/9/27

I'm working on a nice water based serum to use alone or in conjunction with LED treatments, but for those of you who DIY and can't wait, you can find a bunch of these great extracts @

http://www.theherbarie.com/White-Peony-Tea-Extract--pr-23.html

If any other DIY junkies give it a go maybe we can start a thread to share ideas..Wink


That sounds like a lovely idea, I already have my pure EGCG green tea derived and high quality, but was also looking into purchasing the White Tea pure extract to compliment it. Very Happy (both powdered not liquid)

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Kassy_A
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Tue Apr 10, 2012 5:42 pm      Reply with quote
DarkMoon wrote:


That sounds like a lovely idea, I already have my pure EGCG green tea derived and high quality, but was also looking into purchasing the White Tea pure extract to compliment it. Very Happy (both powdered not liquid)


I'm thinking of getting the powdered extract myself.. .5oz is enough to make a 1 & 1/2 gallons fluid volume.. Laughing

Also, I find that even refrigerated, tea extracts loose their oomph too quickly.. I'm definitely going for the powder.

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♥I'm flattered by all the lovely PM's, but I don't get here much these days. Please don't be afraid to post your quearies to other DIY members who will be glad to help you (or sell you their wares..lol) Still happy with LED, dermarolling and a DIY antioxidant regime. Peace & Hugs to all.♥
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Tue Apr 10, 2012 5:53 pm      Reply with quote
Kassy_A wrote:
DarkMoon wrote:


That sounds like a lovely idea, I already have my pure EGCG green tea derived and high quality, but was also looking into purchasing the White Tea pure extract to compliment it. Very Happy (both powdered not liquid)


I'm thinking of getting the powdered extract myself.. .5oz is enough to make a 1 & 1/2 gallons fluid volume.. Laughing

Also, I find that even refrigerated, tea extracts loose their oomph too quickly.. I'm definitely going for the powder.


My thoughts exactly, once in water it starts losing efficacy very fast, so powder just mkes sense to me! I would much prefer to make it often and have all the goodies preserved than waste my time on nothing! Very Happy

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felixia
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Tue Apr 10, 2012 6:22 pm      Reply with quote
DarkMoon wrote:
Kassy_A wrote:
DarkMoon wrote:


That sounds like a lovely idea, I already have my pure EGCG green tea derived and high quality, but was also looking into purchasing the White Tea pure extract to compliment it. Very Happy (both powdered not liquid)


I'm thinking of getting the powdered extract myself.. .5oz is enough to make a 1 & 1/2 gallons fluid volume.. Laughing

Also, I find that even refrigerated, tea extracts loose their oomph too quickly.. I'm definitely going for the powder.


My thoughts exactly, once in water it starts losing efficacy very fast, so powder just mkes sense to me! I would much prefer to make it often and have all the goodies preserved than waste my time on nothing! Very Happy


Hello Kassy & DM,

Just wanted to share the idea that the stability of green tea extract goodies (the egcg bit) could be extended dramatically by adding BHT and EDTA to the formula. I learned about this from Carol Demas (defunct Biochemistry of Beauty forum) and buy both my BHT and EDTA from Bulkactives.

I'm still too new to post (sorry) but for some back-up research if interested, you could possibly google the following paper titles:

1) Pharmacokinetics of the green tea derivative, EGCG, by the topical route of administration in mouse and human skin

Key finding: In a non-stabilized cream, 10% EGCG was lost after 2 days at 37 °C, but the same formulation supplemented with 0.1% butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) had significantly longer stability with ≥90% EGCG remaining after 130 days at 37 °C.

2) Preformulation study of epigallocatechin gallate, a promising antioxidant for topical skin cancer prevention

Key finding: The solution stability of EGCG was prolonged in glycerin and Transcutol P compared with an aqueous environment. The addition of 0.1% concentrations of several antioxidants in combination with 0.025% EDTA caused variable effects on EGCG stability. Butylated hydroxytoluene in glycerin produced the greatest stability improvement for EGCG. The t90 (time for 10% degradation to occur) was 76.1 days at 50°C.

I think it's the latter article that goes more into effects of pH, temp, presence of glycerine etc, but it's BHT which is the star life-saver.

Works for me, anyways. Or at least I hope it does Laughing

Hope that maybe helps a little...I have learned so much from both of you!
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Tue Apr 10, 2012 8:32 pm      Reply with quote
Does anyone have a source for the powdered white tea extract?
Lacy53
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Fri Apr 13, 2012 6:34 pm      Reply with quote
Kassy_A wrote:

I'm thinking of getting the powdered extract myself.. 0.5 oz is enough to make a 1 & 1/2 gallons fluid volume.. Laughing


Where did that calculation come from?

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Fri Apr 13, 2012 7:45 pm      Reply with quote
Does anyone know if Carol Demas is still involved in researching/writing/discussing skincare?

She was brilliant, seemed troubled though Sad

BFG
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Sat Apr 14, 2012 12:03 am      Reply with quote
Quote:
Where did that calculation come from?

Now we are being told that a 0.25% WTE is going to have some effect?
Based on the study it was 10% white tea extract powder...

An invitro test of collagenase and elastase activity using a bacterial derived collagenase and porcine pancreatic elastase...validity is questionable.

Abstract
OBJECTIVE:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/9/27
Anti-collagenase, anti-elastase and anti-oxidant activities of extracts from 21 plants

Quote:
Collagenase assay

Prior to screening in all assays, spectra for all extracts were recorded on a Cary 300 UV-visible spectrophotometer to check for interference and shifts in the lambda max.

The assay employed was based on spectrophotometric methods reported in the literature [12] with some modifications for use in a microplate reader. The assay was performed in 50 mM Tricine buffer (pH 7.5 with 400 mM NaCl and 10 mM CaCl2). Collagenase from Clostridium histolyticum

Quote:
Elastase assay

The assay employed was based on methods from the literature [10]. This assay was performed in 0.2 mM Tris-HCL buffer (pH 8.0). Porcine pancreatic elastase



Quote:
White tea powder was extracted in a similar manner except it was extracted in cold water and used without further processing. Pomegranate fruit and green tea leaf extracts were supplied as used in formulations in glycerine. These were dissolved in water at 10% weight by volume for use in the assays. Two tinctures (rose and mahonia in 90% ethanol) were filtered before evaporation and re-suspension in water for the assays.


...
Quote:

Individual green tea catechins such as EGCG have already been shown to be effective protease inhibitors in the literature [10] as well as in this data set with EGCG having particularly good anti-elastase activity at 250 μM. White tea whole extract exhibits comparable anti-elastase activity to EGCG alongside very high collagenase inhibition at a very small final concentration of 25 μg which suggests additive or synergistic activity between the catechins within the tea extract particularly in the case of collagenase inhibition. Also, as collagenase is a zinc-containing metalloproteinase, the catechins within the tea extract which are known to be metal chelators may bind to the Zn2+ ion within the enzyme thus preventing it from binding with the substrate [10]. In the case of the green tea extract used here, there is relatively low activity compared to that of the white tea which may be due to the extract supplied in glycerine as opposed to a pure aqueous extraction.



Quote:
Full Length Research Paper
Antioxidant capacity of different types of tea products
Karori, S. M.1, Wachira, F. N. 1*, Wanyoko, J. K.2 and Ngure, R. M.1
1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Egerton University, P.O Box 536, Njoro, Kenya.
2Department of Chemistry, Tea Research Foundation of Kenya (TRFK), P.O Box 820 Kericho, Kenya.
Accepted 14 June, 2007
In the present study, twelve different types of commercial tea samples were assayed to determine their
phenolic composition and antioxidant activity. Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography
using a binary gradient system was used for the identification and quantification of individual
catechins. Subsequently, total phenolic content was determined spectrophotometrically according to
the Folin-ciocalteus method. Total theaflavins and thearubigins were also determined. The radical
scavenging behavior of the polyphenols on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) was also
studied spectrophotometrically. The results showed that total polyphenols, total catechins and antioxidant
activity were significantly (P<0.05) different in the commercial tea samples. Green tea had the
highest levels of catechins, total polyphenols and total antioxidant activity. White tea (silvery tip) a rare
specialty type of tea was not significantly different from green tea.
Statistical analysis showed an
essential catechin content influence of the tea extracts on antioxidant activity. Epigallocatechin gallate
(EGCG) was the most potent catechin and the most potent in antioxidant activity (r = 0.989***).
Epigallocatechin
(EGC) (r = 0.787, P<0.001), epicatechin (EC) + catechin (+C) and epicatechigallate (ECG) also
showed significant (P<0.05) antioxidant activity. Black tea contained high levels of theaflavins and
thearubigins, which accounted for most of the antioxidant potential in this type of tea product (r =
0.930*** and r = 0.930*** respectively). These results suggest that conversion of catechins during black
tea processing did not affect the free-radical potency of black tea. Gallic acid (GA) also showed
significant(r = 0.530*) contribution to the antioxidant activity in black tea. Green, black and white tea
products processed from Kenyan tea cultivars originally selected for black tea had significantly
(P<0.05) higher antioxidant activity than green tea processed from tea cultivars from Japan and China.
These results seem to suggest that the cultivar type is critical in determining the antioxidant potency of
tea product and that black teas processed


Quote:
Characterisation of white tea – Comparison to green and black tea
Y. Hilal and U. Engelhardt
Braunschweig University, Department of Food Chemistry, Braunschweig, Germany
Correspondence to: Yumen Hilal, Prof. Dr. U. Engelhardt, Braunschweig University, Department of Food Chemistry, Schleinitzstr. 20,
D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany, Tel: (531) 3917220, Fax: (531) 3917230, E-mail: y.hilal@tu-bs.de, u.engelhardt@tu-bs.de
Received: September 17, 2007; Accepted September 27, 2007

...
2.1 White tea definition
Currently there is no general accepted definition of white tea
and very little international agreement. What could such a
definition be based on?
1. The Chinese position: white tea is defined by the sub-species
it is manufactured from (Camellia sinensis var. khenghe
bai hao and Camellia sinensis var. fudin bai hao) found only
in Fujian province and with minimal processing following
traditional guide-lines. White tea is a seasonal crop (spring)
with special sensory and health benefits.
2. Other producing countries define white tea by plucking
standard i.e. only the bud or first leaves that are plucked
and dried with minimal processing. In this way the delicate
white leaf hairs are left intact lending the appearance of
‘white tea’. It has to be noted that, if this definition would
be generally accepted, it would exclude traditional Chinese
white tea varieties such as Pai Mu Tan (White Peony).
So there are a few issues: firstly the appearance (liquor of white
tea is very pale yellow in color, and mild tasting in cup) and
secondly the manufacture (minimal processing, just drying, no
„fermentation“). There are health claims underway, such as:
(a) white tea is lower in caffeine than green tea, (b) white tea is
much higher in antioxidants, esp. catechins than green tea
and (c) white tea has a higher anti-mutagenicity action compared
to green tea. From compositional data available it can be
stated that the first two claims are completely nonsense.
Currently
there is a great marketing and public interest for white
tea. As there is a high demand but low supply it has sometimes
been suspected that more white tea is now sold than is grown!

....

Quote:
My 'fantastic new actives' are "plant extracts", specifically White Tea; (well not exactly new for me, I've been loving/using white tea for a while.)

INCI Name: Glycerin, Water, Camellia sinensis (White Tea) Extract
Physical Form: Light to medium golden liquid.
Recommended usage: 1-50%

Pardons DrJ for the interlude.

We were discussing paracrine and cytokine cell signaling I recall...

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Sat Apr 14, 2012 3:55 am      Reply with quote
Barefootgirl wrote:
Does anyone know if Carol Demas is still involved in researching/writing/discussing skincare?

She was brilliant, seemed troubled though Sad

BFG


She was/still is brilliant, for sure. Nice with it too.

I don't actually think she's involved in skincare so much now but my hope would be that will change in the future...her book on how to DIY effective cosmetics from 2005 is still a staple of mine (and still available on Cafe Press).

And even though BoB's gone, much of her knowledge is referenced on other sites...from Bulkactives recipe section thru' to her MUA reviews, and on a number of other places which is great.

She used several differnt forum names if I recall...so Carol, if you're on EDS...PM me Laughing
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Sat Apr 14, 2012 5:18 am      Reply with quote
Kassy_A wrote:
My 'fantastic new actives' are "plant extracts", specifically White Tea; (well not exactly new for me, I've been loving/using white tea for a while.) Preventing destruction to collagen & elastin should be a goal for all.. It's never too late to start, but boy do I wish I were 30 or 40 again..

Anti-elastase activities were observed for nine of the extracts with inhibitory activity in the following order: white tea (~89%), cleavers (~58%), burdock root (~51%), bladderwrack (~50%), anise and angelica (~32%). Anti-collagenase activities were exhibited by sixteen plants of which the highest activity was seen in white tea (~87%), green tea (~47%), rose tincture (~41%), and lavender (~31%). Nine plant extracts had activities against both elastase (E) and collagenase (C) and were ranked in the order of white tea (E:89%, C:87%) > bladderwrack (E:50%, C:25%) > cleavers (E:58%, C:7%) > rose tincture (E:22%, C:41%) > green tea (E:10%: C:47%) > rose aqueous (E: 24%, C:26%) > angelica (E:32%, C:17%) > anise (E:32%, C:6%) > pomegranate (E:15%, C:11%).

Read all about it here;

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/9/27

I'm working on a nice water based serum to use alone or in conjunction with LED treatments, but for those of you who DIY and can't wait, you can find a bunch of these great extracts @

http://www.theherbarie.com/White-Peony-Tea-Extract--pr-23.html

If any other DIY junkies give it a go maybe we can start a thread to share ideas..Wink


Kassy,

Is it possible you mixed up the White Tea Extract with the very concentrated Aloe Extract on that site? I happened on that when looking for the powdered extract not long before you posted.

I know when shopping for some actives and searching many sites it has happened to me, we are only human after all. Trying to keep everything in ones head can be challenging checking on multiple actives at multiple suppliers! Very Happy

You know what they say "No harm No foul" Laughing

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Sat Apr 14, 2012 9:49 am      Reply with quote
Lacy53 wrote:
Kassy_A wrote:

I'm thinking of getting the powdered extract myself.. 0.5 oz is enough to make a 1 & 1/2 gallons fluid volume.. Laughing

Where did that calculation come from?

DragoN wrote:

Now we are being told that a 0.25% WTE is going to have some effect?
Based on the study it was 10% white tea extract powder...

An invitro test of collagenase and elastase activity using a bacterial derived collagenase and porcine pancreatic elastase...validity is questionable.

Abstract
OBJECTIVE:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/9/27
Anti-collagenase, anti-elastase and anti-oxidant activities of extracts from 21 plants

"White tea powder was extracted in a similar manner except it was extracted in cold water and used without further processing. Pomegranate fruit and green tea leaf extracts were supplied as used in formulations in glycerine. These were dissolved in water at 10% weight by volume for use in the assays."

Pardons DrJ for the advertising interlude.

We were discussing paracrine and cytokine cell signaling I recall...not this mindless blather about MSC in a cream.

Not the main point under discussion here, but I did want to point out that as well as the green tea, the pomegranate was also a glycerine formulation. Using pure extracts at 10% concentration and comparing them to glycerine-based extracts at 10% proves nothing. Anyone wanting to prepare pure white tea powder extract from dried white tea leaves has a LOT of work ahead of them (see "extraction of plants" in the methodology section and note the sonication required). I think this should also be taken note of:

All plant materials were acquired from Neal's Yard Remedies Ltd.

Competing interests
PH is an employee of Neal's Yard Remedies Ltd, which in part funded the studentship for TT.


Acknowledgements
This work was funded in part by Neal's Yard Remedies Ltd. and by Kingston University.


Neal's Yard Remedies Ltd ... with their Bach Flower Remedies and Homeopathic treatments. Okay, back to the important stuff ... paracrine and cytokine cell signaling and naming "that Fantastic Active"!

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Sat Apr 14, 2012 10:05 am      Reply with quote
felixia,

Do you know what other screen names she uses? I would also like to read her writings elsewhere. I am a MUA member, so knowing her reviews there would be helpful.

Thanks.. BFG
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Sat Apr 14, 2012 10:11 am      Reply with quote
Barefootgirl wrote:
felixia,

Do you know what other screen names she uses? I would also like to read her writings elsewhere. I am a MUA member, so knowing her reviews there would be helpful.

Thanks.. BFG


What is MUA?
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Sat Apr 14, 2012 10:21 am      Reply with quote
MUA = Makeup Alley
http://www.makeupalley.com/

Reviews on skincare and makeup

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Sat Apr 14, 2012 12:03 pm      Reply with quote
Kassy_A wrote:
My 'fantastic new actives' are "plant extracts", specifically White Tea; (well not exactly new for me, I've been loving/using white tea for a while.) Preventing destruction to collagen & elastin should be a goal for all.. It's never too late to start, but boy do I wish I were 30 or 40 again..

Anti-elastase activities were observed for nine of the extracts with inhibitory activity in the following order: white tea (~89%), cleavers (~58%), burdock root (~51%), bladderwrack (~50%), anise and angelica (~32%). Anti-collagenase activities were exhibited by sixteen plants of which the highest activity was seen in white tea (~87%), green tea (~47%), rose tincture (~41%), and lavender (~31%). Nine plant extracts had activities against both elastase (E) and collagenase (C) and were ranked in the order of white tea (E:89%, C:87%) > bladderwrack (E:50%, C:25%) > cleavers (E:58%, C:7%) > rose tincture (E:22%, C:41%) > green tea (E:10%: C:47%) > rose aqueous (E: 24%, C:26%) > angelica (E:32%, C:17%) > anise (E:32%, C:6%) > pomegranate (E:15%, C:11%).

Read all about it here;

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/9/27

I'm working on a nice water based serum to use alone or in conjunction with LED treatments, but for those of you who DIY and can't wait, you can find a bunch of these great extracts @

http://www.theherbarie.com/White-Peony-Tea-Extract--pr-23.html

If any other DIY junkies give it a go maybe we can start a thread to share ideas..Wink


For dragon... I was the one who posted the link to the study, so I'm well aware what it says.. Again, you completely and totally misunderstood me.. I never said this: "Now we are being told that a 0.25% WTE is going to have some effect?"

You gleaned that from my 2nd post, which was speaking about the reconstitution of a raw active.. Please read more carefully.

@Lacy; DM is exactly right, it was the aloe powder that reconstituted to 1 1/2 gallons fluid volume;

http://www.theherbarie.com/Aloe-Vera-Spray-Dried-Powder-200X---Organic-Certified-pr-318.html

I checked out many of the botanical extracts I found in the study, so my bad for getting that mixed up..

Here's a few nice water soluble botanicals to browse if your interested;

http://www.theherbarie.com/Aloe-Vera-Spray-Dried-Powder-200X---Organic-Certified-pr-318.html

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Sat Apr 14, 2012 10:28 pm      Reply with quote
Whatever the case may be, unpleasant exchanges like the one we just removed are truly not appreciated here. If you wish to participate further, then please ensure your posts are directly on topic without any animosity, inflammatory language or reference to personal differences or they too will be removed irrespective of any useful content they may have.

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Sun Apr 15, 2012 11:49 am      Reply with quote
Kassy_A wrote:
Kassy_A wrote:
My 'fantastic new actives' are "plant extracts", specifically White Tea; (well not exactly new for me, I've been loving/using white tea for a while.) Preventing destruction to collagen & elastin should be a goal for all.. It's never too late to start, but boy do I wish I were 30 or 40 again..

Anti-elastase activities were observed for nine of the extracts with inhibitory activity in the following order: white tea (~89%), cleavers (~58%), burdock root (~51%), bladderwrack (~50%), anise and angelica (~32%). Anti-collagenase activities were exhibited by sixteen plants of which the highest activity was seen in white tea (~87%), green tea (~47%), rose tincture (~41%), and lavender (~31%). Nine plant extracts had activities against both elastase (E) and collagenase (C) and were ranked in the order of white tea (E:89%, C:87%) > bladderwrack (E:50%, C:25%) > cleavers (E:58%, C:7%) > rose tincture (E:22%, C:41%) > green tea (E:10%: C:47%) > rose aqueous (E: 24%, C:26%) > angelica (E:32%, C:17%) > anise (E:32%, C:6%) > pomegranate (E:15%, C:11%).

Read all about it here;

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/9/27


@Lacy; DM is exactly right, it was the aloe powder that reconstituted to 1 1/2 gallons fluid volume;

http://www.theherbarie.com/Aloe-Vera-Spray-Dried-Powder-200X---Organic-Certified-pr-318.html

I checked out many of the botanical extracts I found in the study, so my bad for getting that mixed up..


Thanks for the explanation. The study used the actives at 10%. But the main point of my post was that the study is suspect and so are the conclusions. Most studies on tea conclude green tea is superior to white; some say they are equally effective. This is the only study I am aware of that concludes white tea is better. That in itself should raise a few red flags (a consensus of one).

There are other criticisms which can be made about the study other than objectivity. As Dragon pointed out (and has since been deleted), the sale of white tea exceeds the actual production which is impossible. This means there is no guarantee that the white tea you purchase from a supplier is in fact "white" tea. The ingredient is extremely rare.

While the study indicated that white tea was superior, it was supplied by Neal's Yard Remedies. Their website sells pre-packaged herbal teas and dried herbs; I couldn't find white tea under either category. White tea isn't even an ingredient in the "beautiful skin" tea blend. They do however have a line of skincare products called Antioxidant White Tea. I checked at MUA; reviews for the eye gel go back to 2004. The study you mentioned above was published in 2009. Even allowing a 2-year time line (to conduct the study, write and edit the paper for publication) it looks like the study came out after the product. Studies should precede product development, not support your inventory.

Given all that, I wouldn't put much faith in the study you found. If you know of any other research which indicate white tea is superior, please post them.

http://www.nealsyardremedies.com/

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Tue Apr 17, 2012 5:50 am      Reply with quote
Hello,

Any thoughts on Wild Yam... it is in Murad's Resurgence line.

http://www.skinactives.com/Wild-Yam-Diosgenin.html

Would this really be as simple as adding to a ready made cream? Has anyone used this DIY?

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Tue Apr 17, 2012 5:54 am      Reply with quote
How about Vitamin D as an active. No one talks about it, and it is out in a few products now.
I don't have any studies on this active, but would like to hear anyone's thoughts (Dr. J, what do you think?).
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Tue Apr 17, 2012 6:17 am      Reply with quote
rileygirl wrote:
How about Vitamin D as an active. No one talks about it, and it is out in a few products now.
I don't have any studies on this active, but would like to hear anyone's thoughts (Dr. J, what do you think?).


Can't speak for Dr. J but maybe these will be of interest. i will check for more but a quick search brought these up.

http://www.mmpinc.com/upload/pj/MetabolismOfVitaminD,%20C&T%20article.pdf

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070208230136.htm

ETA: Partial as you must buy the full article:

http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/formulating/category/skincare/62661622.html

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Tue Apr 17, 2012 6:45 am      Reply with quote
Thanks, DM! I will try to look at the studies over the weekend.
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