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Cancer Prevention

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Deb Crowley
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Sat Aug 24, 2013 3:14 pm      Reply with quote
Please read the following links and continue to research on your own... your health could be at risk.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/05/12/vitamin-d-may-prevent-breast-cancer.aspx

http://bustingbreastcancer.org/prevention/vitamin-d/

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/08/26/this-could-be-even-bigger-than-the-vitamin-d-discovery.aspx

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ET_2w9OOdtY


Please get your D3 levels checked... The test is called 25(OH)D

Your levels should be NO LOWER than 50 even better at 60... anything lower than 40 is deficient and frankly 40 is still too low. If your Dr tells you otherwise please, please research. It could mean the difference between getting breast cancer / prostrate cancer etc.

BTW I learned one year before I even knew I had breast cancer that my D3 levels were zilch (below 20) I found out by a routine blood work-up from my NEW DR! I didn’t know what that could mean at the time... I sure found out! Research shows 50% of women w/breast cancer and men w/prostrate cancer was dangerously low in D3 (20 and lower)

I may have learned too late...but now my girls know and every member in my family. Knowing what I know now will hopefully prevent a recurrence. And, just maybe I can prevent someone else from the same... PASS IT ON

BTW RE: FACIAL TRAINING

All the facial training to replace facial bone may be for not if you are deficient in D3 and K2mk7

In 2011, researchers presented findings at a meeting of the Endocrine Society in Boston that revealed that women in their 40′s and 50′s who have extensive skin wrinkling are much more likely than their peers to have low bone mass.

Researchers noted the relationship between wrinkles and bone density in every single bone tested which included hip, heel, and lumbar (spine). In addition, this relationship existed regardless of body fat percentage and age.

All the calcium in the world will do nothing for you if you are deficient in D3 and K2… in fact high levels of calcium can cause serious health problems if you don’t have the right amount of D3 and K2 to deal with it properly

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Sat Aug 24, 2013 4:03 pm      Reply with quote
Thank you for this Deb, my mum had breast cancer (in remission now) but nobody has tested her for Vit D levels Exclamation

I am now phoning to get her to get her levels checked!

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Sat Aug 24, 2013 6:15 pm      Reply with quote
Great post Deb... Dr Mercola is Awesome. Also important for breast health and FBD is iodine. Dr David Brownstein talks about how it can even help cancer patients... It along with topical magnesium chloride, zinc, selenium and B complex have helped soften my cysts tremendously! I also take 5000 IUs of D3....
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Sat Aug 24, 2013 6:18 pm      Reply with quote
I used to think Mercola was nuts, but time and research has proved me wrong!

Based on repeated blood work, I am at 10,000ius of Vit D daily. FYI that toxicity is 40,000iu's daily, so I would recommend 5,000 for most people.

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Sat Aug 24, 2013 6:47 pm      Reply with quote
I suggest skip over the worthless testing and start to live naturally.
After all there is only one cure.

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Sat Aug 24, 2013 7:52 pm      Reply with quote
Deb Crowley wrote:
In 2011, researchers presented findings at a meeting of the Endocrine Society in Boston that revealed that women in their 40′s and 50′s who have extensive skin wrinkling are much more likely than their peers to have low bone mass.

Researchers noted the relationship between wrinkles and bone density in every single bone tested which included hip, heel, and lumbar (spine). In addition, this relationship existed regardless of body fat percentage and age.


Sort of right, but not completely correct. The study was done on 114 women who were within 3 years of their last menstrual period. Women taking hormone therapy or those who had facial "surgical alterations" of the skin were excluded from the study. All women resided in Connecticut or New York state. So they were women who lived in the northeastern US and were in the early phase of (full) menopause. What the researchers found was a correlation: Wrinkle score has an inverse correlation with bone density, and firmer skin showed denser bones. But correlation is not causation; it just means there is a relationship between the two examined variables. Furthermore, since all subjects were from the less-sunny NE coast of the US, the findings may not be valid for all women (ie: residents of Florida and California as study participants may show different results or even no correlation between the two variables).

Your post indicates to me that you have assumed that bone density causes increased facial wrinkles. However, the lead researcher Dr. Lubna Pal stated:

Ongoing data from KEEPS will allow the research team to determine if severe skin wrinkles in early postmenopausal women predict more rapid bone loss. This finding is just the tip of the iceberg.

Dr. Pal is saying skin wrinkles may be predictive of bone loss, but bone loss is not necessarily a cause of wrinkles. It may have to do with skin collagen levels which decline with age (particularly following menopause) and the shared tissue infrastructure between the skin and bones (i.e. the protein building-block collagen).

https://www.endocrine.org/sitecore%20modules/web/~/media/endosociety/Files/Publications/Endocrine%20News/Issues/2011/EndocrineNewsJuly2011.pdf#search=%22bone density wrinkles%22 (See Page 31)

Quick question for the forum: Does anyone know if decreased bone density results in a loss of bone size? I know that in aging bones become more porous and this results in less density in the inner core which leads to less strength and easier fracture; I am just not sure it means less overall size (girth, circumference etc.).

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Sat Aug 24, 2013 8:44 pm      Reply with quote
Just piping in to say -
that I'm really grateful and relieved that we have a wise and knowledgeable Primacy Care Physician who knows about this "kind-of-stuff*.

I would've disliked having to argue with him. Very Happy

btw - Thanks, Deb Crowley, for creating this thread.
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Sun Aug 25, 2013 5:43 am      Reply with quote
I second the mention of iodine. I've heard that it is not possible to get breast cancer if your iodine levels are good. Hence the lack of breast cancer in japan, where so much seaweed is consumed.
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Sun Aug 25, 2013 8:26 am      Reply with quote
Lacy53 wrote:

Quick question for the forum: Does anyone know if decreased bone density results in a loss of bone size? I know that in aging bones become more porous and this results in less density in the inner core which leads to less strength and easier fracture; I am just not sure it means less overall size (girth, circumference etc.).


Thanks for clarifying the research above.

Re: the question...I found this:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12878739

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Deb Crowley
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Sun Aug 25, 2013 12:04 pm      Reply with quote
Lacy53 wrote:
Deb Crowley wrote:
In 2011, researchers presented findings at a meeting of the Endocrine Society in Boston that revealed that women in their 40′s and 50′s who have extensive skin wrinkling are much more likely than their peers to have low bone mass.

Researchers noted the relationship between wrinkles and bone density in every single bone tested which included hip, heel, and lumbar (spine). In addition, this relationship existed regardless of body fat percentage and age.


Sort of right, but not completely correct. The study was done on 114 women who were within 3 years of their last menstrual period. Women taking hormone therapy or those who had facial "surgical alterations" of the skin were excluded from the study. All women resided in Connecticut or New York state. So they were women who lived in the northeastern US and were in the early phase of (full) menopause. What the researchers found was a correlation: Wrinkle score has an inverse correlation with bone density, and firmer skin showed denser bones. But correlation is not causation; it just means there is a relationship between the two examined variables. Furthermore, since all subjects were from the less-sunny NE coast of the US, the findings may not be valid for all women (ie: residents of Florida and California as study participants may show different results or even no correlation between the two variables).

Your post indicates to me that you have assumed that bone density causes increased facial wrinkles. However, the lead researcher Dr. Lubna Pal stated:

Ongoing data from KEEPS will allow the research team to determine if severe skin wrinkles in early postmenopausal women predict more rapid bone loss. This finding is just the tip of the iceberg.

Dr. Pal is saying skin wrinkles may be predictive of bone loss, but bone loss is not necessarily a cause of wrinkles. It may have to do with skin collagen levels which decline with age (particularly following menopause) and the shared tissue infrastructure between the skin and bones (i.e. the protein building-block collagen).

https://www.endocrine.org/sitecore%20modules/web/~/media/endosociety/Files/Publications/Endocrine%20News/Issues/2011/EndocrineNewsJuly2011.pdf#search=%22bone density wrinkles%22 (See Page 31)

Quick question for the forum: Does anyone know if decreased bone density results in a loss of bone size? I know that in aging bones become more porous and this results in less density in the inner core which leads to less strength and easier fracture; I am just not sure it means less overall size (girth, circumference etc.).


Hi Lacy

Good follow-up!

Guess I should have posted more info regarding the group studied. I was mostly concerned with age: (pre-menopausal and post-menopausal). This is the age group that begins to lose bone for all the various reasons.

Yes we do lose facial bone (size) in the face. Here are a few diagrams. The eye socket diagram comes from this site (regarding cosmetic surgery)
http://thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2011/01/05/aging-facial-bones-could-cause-wrinkles-crows-feet/

Image

Image
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Regarding bone loss as being the cause for wrinkled skin: If you are losing bone you’re deficient in D3 K2...goes hand-n-hand. However not everybody with wrinkled skin is deficient … So get your levels checked! prevent cancer and keep yourself looking good.

This is where vitamin D comes in: rates of cell division and differentiation are triggered by growth factors and other molecules that are controlled by the presence of vitamin D.11-13 If adequate amounts of vitamin D are not available, your epidermal cells won’t differentiate optimally. As a result, the outer layer of your skin may become thinner and more fragile. It begins to sag from lack of adequate support. Dryness and wrinkles set in as moisture is gradually lost to the outside.14 This is one of the main reasons why vitamin D is absolutely essential to the maintenance of healthy-looking skin.” … see link below
http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2010/jun2010_Optimal-Skin-Protection-with-Vitamin-D_01.htm

If you are losing bone yet you are loading with Calcium... you ARE deficient in D3 and K2. All the calcium in the world without what it takes to process it properly… you are doing zip… high levels of calcium (in blood and tissue) may in fact cause serious health problems (research it)

When the cheekbone, (malar bone) flattens the cheeks begin to sag... causing nasolabial folds and marionette lines.

When the jaw starts to go...it causes a jowling effect, flattens the chin, causes lose skin under chin and neck.

When the orbital bone begins to recede you’ll have hollowing of eyes, bottom lids begin to cave. Upper lid droop and mass wrinkles around the eye (skin has got to go somewhere)

BTW... those of you in facial training...If you have trained your facial muscles to the max, and, you still have what is described above, you need to be building your facial bone (bone remodeling) Again, if you are low in Calcium, D3 K2 it’s not gonna work

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Sun Aug 25, 2013 2:04 pm      Reply with quote
Deb, while I definitely agree with most of what you have posted, most people are over calcified due to our modern diets. Further, without sufficient magnesium all of that calcium isn't going to get into the bones where its needed, and instead will end up in the tissues. Theres a prominent heart doctor who feels calcification is the leading cause of most of heart disease. So while I mostly agree with Dr Mercola & your premise, I believe magnesium is more important. Btw, it can even help with breast calcifications...
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Sun Aug 25, 2013 2:13 pm      Reply with quote
catski wrote:
I second the mention of iodine. I've heard that it is not possible to get breast cancer if your iodine levels are good. Hence the lack of breast cancer in japan, where so much seaweed is consumed.


Yes Catski - the explanation I read about WHY iodine works so well in the prevention and even treatment of breast cancer is that iodine has an affinity for most fatty tissues, especially breast so if you are iodine "sufficient", estrogen cant take up space in the breast tissue. That made a lot of sense to me!
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Sun Aug 25, 2013 4:18 pm      Reply with quote
aprile wrote:
Deb, while I definitely agree with most of what you have posted, most people are over calcified due to our modern diets. Further, without sufficient magnesium all of that calcium isn't going to get into the bones where its needed, and instead will end up in the tissues. Theres a prominent heart doctor who feels calcification is the leading cause of most of heart disease. So while I mostly agree with Dr Mercola & your premise, I believe magnesium is more important. Btw, it can even help with breast calcifications...


Hi April!

The following article (which I cut up bigtime) will explain the connection between D, K2, and Magnesium

The very reason you call for Magnesium is exactly why one has to take K2.
__________________________________

·Vitamin K2 is an important fat-soluble vitamin that plays critical roles in protecting your heart and brain, and building strong bones. It also plays an important role in cancer protection

·The biological role of vitamin K2 is to help move calcium into the proper areas in your body, such as your bones and teeth. It also helps remove calcium from areas where it shouldn't be, such as in your arteries and soft tissues

·The optimal amounts of vitamin K2 are still under investigation, but it seems likely that 180 to 200 micrograms of vitamin K2 might be enough to activate your body's K2-dependent proteins to shuttle calcium to the proper areas

·If you take oral vitamin D, you also need to take vitamin K2. Vitamin K2 deficiency is actually what produces the symptoms of vitamin D toxicity, which includes inappropriate calcification that can lead to hardening of your arteries

·If you take a calcium supplement, it's important to maintain the proper balance between calcium, vitamin K2, vitamin D, and magnesium. Lack of balance between these nutrients is why calcium supplements have become associated with increased risk of heart attack and stroke

Dr. Kate Rheaume-Bleue, a naturopathic physician with a keen interest in nutrition, has authored what I believe is one of the most comprehensive books on this important topic, titled: Vitamin K2 and the Calcium Paradox: How a Little Known Vitamin Could Save Your Life.

The three types of vitamin K are:

1.Vitamin K1, or phylloquinone, is found naturally in plants, especially green vegetables; K1 goes directly to your liver and helps you maintain healthy blood clotting

2.Vitamin K2, also called menaquinone, is made by the bacteria that line your gastrointestinal tract; K2 goes straight to your blood vessel walls, bones, and tissues other than your liver

3.Vitamin K3, or menadione, is a synthetic form I do not recommend; it’s important to note that toxicity has occurred in infants injected with this synthetic vitamin K3

How Much Vitamin K2 Do You Need?


The optimal amounts of vitamin K2 are still under investigation, but it seems likely that 180 to 200 micrograms of vitamin K2 should be enough to activate your body’s K2-dependent proteins to shuttle the calcium where it needs to be, and remove it from the places where it shouldn’t.

“The most recent clinical trials used around those amounts of K2,” Rheaume-Bleue says. “The average person is getting a lot less than
She estimates that about 80 percent of Americans do not get enough vitamin K2 in their diet to activate their K2 proteins, which is similar to the deficiency rate of vitamin D. Vitamin K2 deficiency leaves you vulnerable for a number of chronic diseases, including:Osteoporosis Heart disease Heart attack and stroke Inappropriate calcification, from heel spurs to kidney stones Brain disease Cancer

“I talked about vitamin K2 moving calcium around the body. Its other main role is to activate proteins that control cell growth. That means K2 has a very important role to play in cancer protection,” Rheaume-Bleue says.

The Interplay Between Vitamin K2, Vitamin D, and Calcium:

For so long, we’ve been told to take calcium for osteoporosis… and vitamin D, which we know is helpful. But then, more studies are coming out showing that increased calcium intake is causing more heart attacks and strokes. That created a lot of confusion around whether calcium is safe or not. But that’s the wrong question to be asking, because we’ll never properly understand the health benefits of calcium or vitamin D, unless we take into consideration K2. That’s what keeps the calcium in its right place.”

IMPORTANT: If You Take Vitamin D, You Need K2


“We don’t see symptoms of vitamin D toxicity very often. But when we do, those symptoms are inappropriate calcification. That’s the symptom of vitamin D toxicity. And it is actually a lack of vitamin K2 that can cause that…”

While the ideal or optimal ratios between vitamin D and vitamin K2 have yet to be elucidated, Rheume-Bleue suggests that for every 1,000 IU’s of vitamin D you take, you may benefit from about 100 micrograms of K2, and perhaps as much as 150-200 micrograms (mcg).


“My earlier recommendation was not taking into account people who were doing high dose of vitamin D supplementation,” Rheaume-Bleue says. “That’s where it gets a little bit more technical. It seems that for the average person, around 200 to 280 micrograms will activate your K2 proteins and do a lot of good for your bones and your heart. If you’re taking high levels of vitamin D… then I would recommend taking more K2.”

The good news is that vitamin K2 has no toxicity. No toxic effects have ever been demonstrated in the medical literature.

“The reason why K2 doesn’t have potential toxic effect is that all vitamin K2 does is activate K2 proteins. It will activate all the K2 proteins it finds. And if they’re all activated and you take extra K2, it simply won’t do that. That’s why we don’t see a potential for toxicity the way we do with vitamin A or D,” she says.

· Vitamin K2
· Vitamin D
· Magnesium

The Importance of Magnesium

As mentioned previously, magnesium is another important player to allow for proper function of calcium. As with vitamin D and K2, magnesium deficiency is also common, and when you are lacking in magnesium and take calcium, you may exacerbate the situation. Vitamin K2 and magnesium complement each other, as magnesium helps lower blood pressure, which is an important component of heart disease.

Rheaume-Bleue recommends using magnesium citrate. Another emerging one is magnesium threonate, which appears promising primarily due to its superior ability to penetrate the mitochondrial membrane.

How Can You Tell if You’re Lacking in Vitamin K2?

There’s no way to test for vitamin K2 deficiency. But by assessing your diet and lifestyle, you can get an idea of whether or not you may be lacking in this critical nutrient. If you have any of the following health conditions, you’re likely deficient in vitamin K2 as they are all connected to K2:

· Do you have osteoporosis?
· Do you have heart disease?
· Do you have diabetes?

Sources and References

·1 Modern Rheumatology 2012 Nov 6. [Epub ahead of print]
·2 Science 2012 Jun 8;336(6086):1306-10.

For complete artical: http://www.lewrockwell.com/2012/12/joseph-mercola/what-you-need-to-know-about-vitamin-k2-d-andcalcium/

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Sun Aug 25, 2013 4:40 pm      Reply with quote
I will be adding Vit K2 pronto!

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Sun Aug 25, 2013 4:43 pm      Reply with quote
Very interesting Deb - i will check out vitamin K2. I imagine there arent a lot of food sources. Ho hum another pill to add to the protocol. Lol. 😀
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Sun Aug 25, 2013 6:01 pm      Reply with quote
aprile wrote:
Very interesting Deb - i will check out vitamin K2. I imagine there arent a lot of food sources. Ho hum another pill to add to the protocol. Lol. ��


I did wonder about this too ^ ^.

(from a 2008 article)

Vitamin K2: The Missing Nutrient
By Chris Kresser on May 6, 2008


http://chriskresser.com/vitamin-k2-the-missing-nutrient



(snippet from article)

All of this evidence points to the possibility that vitamin K2 may be an essential nutrient in the human diet. So where does one find vitamin K2 in foods? The following is a list of the foods highest in vitamin K2, as measured by the USDA:

Foods high in vitamin K2
■Natto
■Hard cheese
■Soft cheese
■Egg yolk
■Butter
■Chicken liver
■Salami
■Chicken breast
■Ground beef
Unfortunately, precise values for some foods that are likely to be high in K2 (such as organ meats) are not available at this time. The pancreas and salivary glands would be richest; reproductive organs, brains, cartilage and possibly kidneys would also be very rich; finally, bone would be richer than muscle meat. Fish eggs are also likely to be rich in K2.

It was once erroneously believed that intestinal bacteria are a major contributor to vitamin K status. However, the majority of evidence contradicts this view. Most of the vitamin K2 produced in the intestine are embedded within bacterial membranes and not available for absorption. Thus, intestinal production of K2 likely makes only a small contribution to vitamin K status. (Unden & Bongaerts, 1997, pp. 217-234)

On the other hand, fermented foods, however, such as sauerkraut, cheese and natto (a soy dish popular in Japan), contain substantial amounts of vitamin K2. Natto contains the highest concentration of K2 of any food measured; nearly all of it is present as MK-7, which research has shown to be a highly effective form. A recent study demonstrated that MK-7 increased the percentage of osteocalcin in humans three times more powerfully than did vitamin K1. (Schurgers & Vermeer, 2000, pp. 298-307)

It is important to note that commercial butter is not a significantly high source of vitamin K2. Dr. Weston A. Price, who was the first to elucidate the role of vitamin K2 in human health (though he called it “Activator X” at the time) analyzed over 20,000 samples of butter sent to him from various parts of the world. As mentioned previously in this paper, he found that the Activator X concentration varied 50-fold. Animals grazing on vitamin K-rich cereal grasses, especially wheat grass, and alfalfa in a lush green state of growth produced fat with the highest amounts of Activator X, but the soil in which the pasture was grown also influenced the quality of the butter. It was only the vitamin-rich butter grown in three feet or more of healthy top soil that had such dramatic curing properties when combined with cod liver oil in Dr. Price’s experiments and clinical practice.

ETA - 'Twas my underlined. I don't know if there are precise values currently available in 2013.
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Sun Aug 25, 2013 6:17 pm      Reply with quote
Deb Crowley wrote:


....BTW... those of you in facial training...If you have trained your facial muscles to the max, and, you still have what is described above, you need to be building your facial bone (bone remodeling) Again, if you are low in Calcium, D3 K2 it’s not gonna work.


Gosh, what an interesting notion.."If you have trained your facial muscles to the max..."

I hadn't ever considered that there was a *max*.
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Sun Aug 25, 2013 7:38 pm      Reply with quote
I started taking K2 about 3 weeks ago to help with osteopenia.

I found these articles useful:

http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2008/mar2008_Protecting-Bone-And-Arterial-Health-With-Vitamin-K2_01.htm

http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2010/nov2010_The-Remarkable-Anticancer-Properties-of-Vitamin-K_01.htm
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Sun Aug 25, 2013 7:47 pm      Reply with quote
Thanks for posting this Deb. I've been taking K2 for almost 5 years now. Always trying to get at least 100mcg of the MK7 form. During this time I've added 500mg magnesium citrate, 5000iu d3. Along with a ton of other supps...col.
My favorite K2 supp is from vitacost http://www.vitacost.com/vitacost-ultra-vitamin-k-with-advanced-k2-complex
It has the exact ratio of the higher cost one that Life Extension sells.
One VERY interesting thing has happened in this time. I had a couple of cavities that needed to be filled but never got around to doing it. What has happened is that both cavities have remineralized. I no longer have pain in these teeth and you can see where the cavities have been covered up during this process. While this is somewhat off topic, I think it is relevant in that if it is doing that to my teeth, imagine what it's doing for my bones, arteries. I also have been following a more Paleo type eating plan which lowers the amount of Phytic Acid I'm eating. Phytic acid leaches minerals from the body and is one of the reasons many people go on Pale diets. The teeth remineralization may sound far fetched to most for sure. Heck I sure would not try to convince a dentist about it. But it's nothing new and has been proven many years ago. Dr.Price (mentioned above) has done much study into this. Do a google search on it.

Thank you ShastaGirl for posting that.
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Sun Aug 25, 2013 8:42 pm      Reply with quote
I have had teeth remineralize from time to time. And it was my dentist who pointed it out!
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Sun Aug 25, 2013 9:27 pm      Reply with quote
Hi All,

What a wonderful topic, thanks “Deb”.

I just wanted to chime in with a few quick thoughts FWIW. I have no copy/paste/links to offer, just a few thoughts off the top of my old head.

Re Bones:

Throughout our lifetime our bones do indeed go through a process of formation & absorption that is called “remodeling”. As we age, the formation of new bone is reduced, but the dreaded re-absorption stays pretty much the same.. The result? Decreased bone size, bone mass and density. It is the decreased “mineral” content in our bones, that causes both fragility and lost density. It’s the stored calcium in our bones that help the remodeling process. To add insult to injury, the connective tissue and ligaments that act as cushions between our bones, lose some of their elasticity as we age, and that all leads to fragility and (for some), osteoporosis.

The majority of women reach their peak bone mass at about 25 years old.. (genetics, diet etc play a roll of course, but that’s a good average for the purpose of discussion.) By the time we get to our 40’s we slowly (and progressively) begin to lose bone mass.. Can we completely avoid it? NOPE! Can we slow the loss down some? YEP! 1.) Plenty of exercise, especially weight bearing, 2.) Don’t smoke, 3.) Limit alcohol to no more than 2 or 3 drinks/week, 3.) Get plenty of vitamins and minerals the natural way through food + some sunshine, and use supplements… well… as a supplement..lol.

And as a few of our esteemed members shared, vitamins and minerals can certainly help with a number of issues. With that in mind, just allow me to bring a few facts to the attention of any member who might not be aware of a precaution or two.

Vitamin K2:

If you are on ANY aspirin, or anti-coagulant therapy, you should NOT take an additional vitamin K supplement. (vitamin K is a coagulant!)

Vitamin K is fat soluble so if it is taken as a supplement, it will not do you any good unless you take it with a bit of “fatty” food. (To get a decent amount of vitamin K the natural way, just sauté a nice bunch of spinach in a bit of olive oil… plenty of lovely foods have vit K!)

Calcium:

It’s unfortunate, but a large percent of women don’t pay attention to the need for calcium until they hit the peri menopausal age and start to get nervous about bone health.. It’s unfortunate because the benefits of a calcium supplement are cumulative, so it’s really best to get a good “store” of calcium during your peak bone years. Just taking a supplement later in life won’t work any miracles..Calcium is stored in our bones and teeth, and the “stores” are what helps to make the new bone in the “remodeling” phase. If memory serves, this remodeling of bone occurs about every 10 years through adulthood. (I’m guilty as charged, and neglected taking a supplement until I was way post menopausal. I just looked and felt so darned good that I didn’t even think of it. Woe is me now.)

Vitamin D:

Also a fat soluble vitamin, so it’s best taken with a meal.
If you like to get your vitamin D from the sun, just remember that the more skin you expose, the more vit D you will make. Exposing your entire back is best, and if you live in Ca, Fl or the like, 15 minutes per day can do ya if you are light skinned. (And guess what? All those minutes walking to your car, getting mail etc count.) Also keep in mind, the lighter your skin the quicker you’ll make vit D, the darker your skin the longer it takes.

Magnesium, phosphorous, zinc and vitamin A are equally important for optimum bone health.. Luckily most people are lucky enough to get all of the vitamins and minerals we need from the foods we eat. For me supplements will always remain just that… A supplement for what I can’t get from diet alone. Some vitamins can be lethal.. Just because *things* are sold OTC (over the counter), doesn’t mean it’s safe and effective for everyone.

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Kath91
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Mon Aug 26, 2013 2:53 am      Reply with quote
Kassy_A wrote:

....Vitamin K2:

If you are on ANY aspirin, or anti-coagulant therapy, you should NOT take an additional vitamin K supplement. (vitamin K is a coagulant!)....


Just to underscore one of all your great tips ^^ ---- wanted to post this *warning* I remembered reading re the VitK2 supplement from the upthread VitaCost link/post.

"Warnings
Pregnant or lactating women, diabetics, hypoglycemics, and people with known medical conditions and/or taking drugs should consult with a licensed physician and/or pharmacist prior to taking dietary supplements. Keep out of reach of children. Individuals currently taking anticoagulants such as Coumadin (warfarin) should consult with their personal physician before taking supplemental vitamin K. Do not exceed recommended dose."
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Mon Aug 26, 2013 9:45 am      Reply with quote
This is a great thread! I have a wonderful, proactive doctor who checks the d level on all her patients. I keep my level around 80, so I need to take 12,000 IUs. I have this test annually to ensure I'm in an optimal range.

My sister, who is nurse and who was getting annual mammograms for the past 10 years, was diagnosed with Stage 1 breast cancer last November. The mammograms never indicated any concern, she was the one who found the lump.She did radiation and thankfully is doing very well. I turned her onto the oncologist who works for Life Extension. Julie is now taking 12, 000 IUs of D and her level rose from 42 to 76.

I also take vitamin K, magnesium, and Iodoral (iodine). I take NAC daily and it was recommended to my sister to take 2400mg of NAC daily.


Another wonderful supplement I take, amongst many others, is BrocColinate and started my sister on it months ago.
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Mon Aug 26, 2013 11:29 am      Reply with quote
Kath91 wrote:
Kassy_A wrote:

....Vitamin K2:

If you are on ANY aspirin, or anti-coagulant therapy, you should NOT take an additional vitamin K supplement. (vitamin K is a coagulant!)....


Just to underscore one of all your great tips ^^ ---- wanted to post this *warning* I remembered reading re the VitK2 supplement from the upthread VitaCost link/post.

"Warnings
Pregnant or lactating women, diabetics, hypoglycemics, and people with known medical conditions and/or taking drugs should consult with a licensed physician and/or pharmacist prior to taking dietary supplements. Keep out of reach of children. Individuals currently taking anticoagulants such as Coumadin (warfarin) should consult with their personal physician before taking supplemental vitamin K. Do not exceed recommended dose."


Hi Kath,

If you are taking a Vit. K complex it generally comes with K1 which does effect blood (clotting factors) that’s why the warning if you are taking blood thinners. However K2Mk7 does just the opposite. The following can be found on this link: http://www.healthyimmunity.com/forum/viewthread.aspx?id=169
____________

Vitamin K2 and Blood Clotting

The "K" in vitamin K comes from the German word koagulation. Vitamin K1 is used by your liver as a clotting factor, whereas vitamin K2 is used by the brain, vasculature, breasts and kidneys and is not a blood clotting agent. In fact, in the brain, vitamin K2 contributes to the production of myelin and fats essential for brain health and protects against oxidative damage. Taking broad-spectrum antibiotics can reduce vitamin K production in the gut by nearly 74 percent compared to people not taking these antibiotics. Additionally, the elderly have reduced vitamin K2 production. Deficiencies can lead to nose bleeds, easy bruising and extremely heavy menstrual bleeding (menorrhagia).

Vitamin K2 is not involved in clotting like Vitamin K1.

Further to the informatin above Vitamin K2 MK7 from Natto has natural clot busting properties. Japanese researcher Dr. Hiroyuki Sumi had spent many years searching for a natural thrombolytic agent that could successfully dissolve blood clots associated with heart attacks and stroke. Finally in 1980, after testing more than 173 natural foods, Sumi found what he was looking for.

Some traditional Natto was dropped onto artificial thrombus (blood clot) in a petri
dish and allowed to stand at 37 degrees C (approximately body temperature)—and over the next 18 hours, the thrombus around the Natto completely dissolved! Sumi named the newly discovered protease enzyme Nattokinase, which means “enzyme in Natto.” Dr. Sumi remarked that Nattokinase showed “a potency matched by no other enzyme.”

How does Nattokinase (K2 Mk7) work?

Nattokinase enhances our body’s natural ability to fight blood clots, and has an advantage over blood thinners because it has a prolonged effect without side effects.

Vitamin K2 Mk7 like Nattokinase:

Supports normal blood pressure Prevents blood clots from forming Dissolves existing blood clots Dissolves fibrin Enhances the body’s production of plasmin and other clot-dissolving agents, including urokinase (an enzyme produced by the kidneys and found in the urine, which activates plasminogen)

Research studies Nattokinase has been the subject of numerous scientific studies, including two small human trials. In 1990, Dr. Sumi’s research team published a series of studies demonstrating the fibrinolytic effects of Nattokinase.

___________________

Because of my breast cancer I had to take Tamoxifen which CAUSES blood clots... consequently I had a TIA and was then told to take a low dose aspirin (baby aspirin) once a day. Can't believe they call it baby aspirin.. you would NEVER give aspirin to a baby! Then wound up with sever gastritis...seriously? really? So now NO Tamoxifen... so done with it!

Anyway... It's a damn good thing K2Mk7 does not cause clotting because I am on mega doses (2 mg) to counter my D3 consumption 20,000IU This works out to 1mcg of K2Mk7 for every 1,000IU of D3. THANK GOD there is no toxicity (that they know of) Rolling Eyes

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Marie-Andree
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Mon Aug 26, 2013 11:52 am      Reply with quote
Deb, you are so on the ball ! I am copying all your info. I take 5000 units of D3 with 90 mcg of MK-7 (K2). I see that I will have to increase my K2. We are also benefitting from your experience as a cancer patient. Thank you for the excellent info.
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