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Keliu
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Wed Sep 25, 2013 5:28 pm      Reply with quote
aprile wrote:
Keliu wrote:
In Australia, natropaths are not regulated - so anyone can call themselves a natropath. Is this the same in the US and UK?

http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/40276.html



ABSOLUTELY NOT!! Presently, Naturopaths are licensed in 14 states within the U.S., and that number is growing.


I can't see how you can use the words "absolutely not" - with capitals and exclamation marks - and then immediately follow it up with the fact that they are only licensed in 14 states. That actually leaves 36 states in which there is no regulation - not exactly "absolute".

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Wed Sep 25, 2013 5:31 pm      Reply with quote
Lacy53 wrote:


Note that naturopathy is part of alternative medicine; practitioners believe the body can heal itself with help (if necessary) through homeopathy, botanicals, and other traditional (pre-science) methods.


I was just reading that "old school" or more traditional naturopaths also don't prescribe supplements or vitamins - the preference is for homoeopathy. I thought that was interesting.

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Wed Sep 25, 2013 6:04 pm      Reply with quote
Keliu wrote:
Lacy53 wrote:


Note that naturopathy is part of alternative medicine; practitioners believe the body can heal itself with help (if necessary) through homeopathy, botanicals, and other traditional (pre-science) methods.


don't prescribe supplements or vitamins


Correct.Vitamins are made in the gut in the pressence of real foods.

Pineapple contains the entire range of vitamins! 16 minerals! ,bromelain(an enzyme that eats dead tissue inside the body) and iodine! which everybody should be aware of here both for chelation and for anti-cancer.

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Wed Sep 25, 2013 6:07 pm      Reply with quote
Cervical dysplasia... can lead to cancer.

This is something we are pretty much aware of. But, there is something that so many women do not know that can make a HUGE difference in what can and should be done about it.

Here is what happened to me:

Several years ago (in my 30s) I began to get dysplasia over and over again. Each time my pap came up ‘dysplasia’ my GYN would do a biopsy. I had several in his office and even one in the hosp. After the biopsy he would freeze the area and I would pretty much go through the same thing the following year! My Dr. would say...“you don’t plan on having any more kids you should have a hysterectomy.”

Now... at that time, I was a competitive bodybuilder and the idea of surgery made me fear my competitive days would be over. I would always say to him... I don’t have a problem with that but...later...as late as I can safely put it off.

Well, the day came when I had a pap that came back CIN1 (beyond dysplasia) I asked him if he was going to freeze it or whatever and he said ...”I’m not able to do another biopsy, you have to have a hysterectomy” At that point I caved and said ok...lets do it.

Now, back then, we didn’t have the Internet and the area I’m from didn’t even have a decent bookstore. I wanted to know just what I was in for with this surgery so I went to a store in town that carried nothing but magazines. I found a Women’s Healthcare magazine and it just happened to have an article written by a Dr. covering dysplasia. He said... that if a woman is constantly dieting... (dieting was my middle name) and was also taking birth control she may be seriously void of Folic Acid leading to constantly having bad paps. He suggested that if a woman is shown to have dysplasia she should be given 10mg’s of Folic Acid every day (for two weeks) and then re-do the pap.

The date was already set for my surg. But I was determined to give this Dr’s suggestion a try... certainly had nothing to lose.

I called the office, told my Dr about what I read and asked for a Rx for Folic Acid. He said it was nonsense. I asked him to just humor me and please do it... he asked me to drop-off the article and he would let me know. I did, then waited a few days and called him back... he told the nurse to go ahead and call in the Rx and for me not to get my hopes up.

I did exactly what the article suggested and went back for another pap...SQUEAKY CLEAN! (all the way from CIN1) NO SURGERY!... and I have never had another bad pap (age 65) I take one 800mcg of folic acid a day.

A year or so ago my girlfriend who also goes to the same GYN said she was going in for a cone-biopsy (sp) for dysplasia. I told her what happened to me and to give it a try...she didn’t want to say anything to the Dr about it. She called the office and postponed the biopsy for a later date. She took the Folic Acid, and went to the health clinic for a pap) ... SQUEAKLY CLEAN! Boy was she pissed.

Today I have a different GYN. When my new GYN gave me my first yearly pap, her words... “WHAT A MESS!” she said “Deb you don’t even have a cervix’s you are nothing but scar tissue... If you ever have to have a hysterectomy it will have to be through your abdomen (not vaginal) there are no visual markers to even make a safe incision.”

I got to thinking about all of this the other night...I wondered if this information could now be found on the net. Here is the link.

http://www.homeopathicdoctor.ca/Health_Notes/CONCERN/PAP_SM_1.HTM

It reads in part:

“Large amounts of folic acid 10 mg per day—have been shown to improve the abnormal Pap smears of women who are taking birth control pills. Folic acid does not improve the Pap smears of women who are not taking oral contraceptives. High blood levels of folic acid have been linked to protecting against the development of cervical dysplasia.”

Actually, the comment above saying “ Folic acid does not improve the Pap smears of women who are not taking oral contraceptives” is wrong.
The woman I told to take 10 mg per day (for 2 weeks) was not taking birth control (late 50’s.)

So, again, even with the up-to-date information, you still may not be getting it straight.
How is it that a GYN (not a GP) would have to read a women’s health mag. to find out something that important in his field of medicine?

How many unnecessary hysterectomies, not to mention dysplasia turning into cervical cancer... Again, something as simple as a vitamin supplement.

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Wed Sep 25, 2013 6:35 pm      Reply with quote
Deb - were you prescribed Folic Acid during your pregnancies?

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Wed Sep 25, 2013 7:12 pm      Reply with quote
Deb Crowley wrote:


...Here is what happened to me:...



... I wanted to know just what I was in for with this surgery so I went to a store in town that carried nothing but magazines. I found a Women’s Healthcare magazine and it just happened to have an article written by a Dr. covering dysplasia....



Not *just-luck*, but pure *providence*. Wow!


Deep THX for sharing all your insights.
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Wed Sep 25, 2013 7:42 pm      Reply with quote
Lacy,

Just to be clear - I am aware that ND's are not be considered traditional allopathic medical doctors, but they do indeed practice medicine, ableit a different brand of medicine. Some uneducated people might even consider them quacks or unqualified, but nothing could be further from the truth. them. Traditional allopathic medical doctors complete 3200 hours of training, while NDs complete 2800, but that's not a significant difference. According to the American Association of Naturpathic Physicians their Professional Education is as follows:

Quote:
A licensed naturopathic physician (ND) attends a four-year, graduate-level naturopathic medical school and is educated in all of the same basic sciences as an MD, but also studies holistic and nontoxic approaches to therapy with a strong emphasis on disease prevention and optimizing wellness. In addition to a standard medical curriculum, the naturopathic physician also studies clinical nutrition, homeopathic medicine, botanical medicine, psychology, and counseling. A naturopathic physician takes rigorous professional board exams so that he or she may be licensed by a state or jurisdiction as a primary care general practice physician. Please see the AANMC’s Professional Competency Profile for more information.


And you are correct, in America: Individual states decide their own Scope of practice regulations vary among licensed/regulated states and provinces, as do the parameters and restrictions for practitioners located in as yet unlicensed venues. Legal provisions still allow naturopathic doctors to consult with patients, making recommendations and suggestions based on prior diagnosis, in several of the yet unlicensed states and provinces."

New York State is currently working toward the passage of state licensing laws governing the practice of naturopathic medicine. If you click on the link below there's a great video explaining Naturpathic Doctors and their importance within the medical commmunity. There's also a great testimonial from a 9-11 fireman who credits his recovery to the care he received from his Naturopathic Doctor. Eye opener...

http://nyanp.org/
Best, Aprile Wink
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Wed Sep 25, 2013 7:49 pm      Reply with quote
Deb Crowley wrote:
Cervical dysplasia... can lead to cancer.

This is something we are pretty much aware of. But, there is something that so many women do not know that can make a HUGE difference in what can and should be done about it.

Here is what happened to me:

Several years ago (in my 30s) I began to get dysplasia over and over again. Each time my pap came up ‘dysplasia’ my GYN would do a biopsy. I had several in his office and even one in the hosp. After the biopsy he would freeze the area and I would pretty much go through the same thing the following year! My Dr. would say...“you don’t plan on having any more kids you should have a hysterectomy.”

Now... at that time, I was a competitive bodybuilder and the idea of surgery made me fear my competitive days would be over. I would always say to him... I don’t have a problem with that but...later...as late as I can safely put it off.

Well, the day came when I had a pap that came back CIN1 (beyond dysplasia) I asked him if he was going to freeze it or whatever and he said ...”I’m not able to do another biopsy, you have to have a hysterectomy” At that point I caved and said ok...lets do it.

Now, back then, we didn’t have the Internet and the area I’m from didn’t even have a decent bookstore. I wanted to know just what I was in for with this surgery so I went to a store in town that carried nothing but magazines. I found a Women’s Healthcare magazine and it just happened to have an article written by a Dr. covering dysplasia. He said... that if a woman is constantly dieting... (dieting was my middle name) and was also taking birth control she may be seriously void of Folic Acid leading to constantly having bad paps. He suggested that if a woman is shown to have dysplasia she should be given 10mg’s of Folic Acid every day (for two weeks) and then re-do the pap.

The date was already set for my surg. But I was determined to give this Dr’s suggestion a try... certainly had nothing to lose.

I called the office, told my Dr about what I read and asked for a Rx for Folic Acid. He said it was nonsense. I asked him to just humor me and please do it... he asked me to drop-off the article and he would let me know. I did, then waited a few days and called him back... he told the nurse to go ahead and call in the Rx and for me not to get my hopes up.

I did exactly what the article suggested and went back for another pap...SQUEAKY CLEAN! (all the way from CIN1) NO SURGERY!... and I have never had another bad pap (age 65) I take one 800mcg of folic acid a day.

A year or so ago my girlfriend who also goes to the same GYN said she was going in for a cone-biopsy (sp) for dysplasia. I told her what happened to me and to give it a try...she didn’t want to say anything to the Dr about it. She called the office and postponed the biopsy for a later date. She took the Folic Acid, and went to the health clinic for a pap) ... SQUEAKLY CLEAN! Boy was she pissed.

Today I have a different GYN. When my new GYN gave me my first yearly pap, her words... “WHAT A MESS!” she said “Deb you don’t even have a cervix’s you are nothing but scar tissue... If you ever have to have a hysterectomy it will have to be through your abdomen (not vaginal) there are no visual markers to even make a safe incision.”

I got to thinking about all of this the other night...I wondered if this information could now be found on the net. Here is the link.

http://www.homeopathicdoctor.ca/Health_Notes/CONCERN/PAP_SM_1.HTM

It reads in part:

“Large amounts of folic acid 10 mg per day—have been shown to improve the abnormal Pap smears of women who are taking birth control pills. Folic acid does not improve the Pap smears of women who are not taking oral contraceptives. High blood levels of folic acid have been linked to protecting against the development of cervical dysplasia.”

Actually, the comment above saying “ Folic acid does not improve the Pap smears of women who are not taking oral contraceptives” is wrong.
The woman I told to take 10 mg per day (for 2 weeks) was not taking birth control (late 50’s.)

So, again, even with the up-to-date information, you still may not be getting it straight.
How is it that a GYN (not a GP) would have to read a women’s health mag. to find out something that important in his field of medicine?

How many unnecessary hysterectomies, not to mention dysplasia turning into cervical cancer... Again, something as simple as a vitamin supplement.


Deb,

All I can say is "Wow". You sure have been through it all. God Bless you! Also you have been extremely courageous in your quest for natural health and I applaud you for that. so many women in your generation would not think outside the box and acquiesce to their doctors recommendations, despite their hesitations. I too have learned so much by doing simple research and following my instincts to avoid any further harm. All I can say about you is ~ You go girlfriend!!! All the best, Aprile
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Wed Sep 25, 2013 8:13 pm      Reply with quote
aprile wrote:
Lacy,

Just to be clear - I am aware that ND's are not be considered traditional allopathic medical doctors, but they do indeed practice medicine, ableit a different brand of medicine. Some uneducated people might even consider them quacks or unqualified, but nothing could be further from the truth. them. Traditional allopathic medical doctors complete 3200 hours of training, while NDs complete 2800, but that's not a significant difference.
Best, Aprile Wink


Yes Aprile, I know you are aware that Naturopaths are alternative medicine practitioners; my comment was directed at uninformed readers of this thread.

It's "not a significant difference" ... why would you think that?

Take away all the hours spent learning about questionable medicine (such as homeopathy) and then calculate the number of hours spent learning factual information; I think you may change your opinion about significance. Don't forget that after medical school, doctors also complete their training under professional guidance while doing their residency/internship. That adds another 3 to 7 years to the education/training of MDs. Naturopaths don't do that.

"A different brand of medicine" is a very strange phrase. As far as I am concerned, there is only one kind of medicine: the kind that is scientifically proven to work. All the rest is just placebo and wishful thinking and falls under the umbrella of "alternative" medicine.

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Wed Sep 25, 2013 9:32 pm      Reply with quote
Lacy53 wrote:


"A different brand of medicine" is a very strange phrase. As far as I am concerned, there is only one kind of medicine: the kind that is scientifically proven to work. All the rest is just placebo and wishful thinking and falls under the umbrella of "alternative" medicine.


I think it's worthy to note that much that has been proven scientifically at one point was considered nutty at some other time. This quote, regarding smallpox,for example,( bold and underline are my edits):

"Although variolation had become common practice in China and much of Africa by the seventeenth century, Western European medicine still saw the practice as being nothing more than folklore. It wouldn't be until Italian physician Dr. Emmanuel Timoni of Constantinople promoted the practice that variolation would begin its spread through Western Europe. After coming across the practice in Constantinople, TImoni wrote a letter describing the method in detail which was later published in the Philosophical Transactions in early 1714.[4]:77 His account would become the first medical account of variolation to appear in Europe. Although the article did not gain widespread notoriety, it caught the attention of two important figures in the variolation movement, Bostonian preacher Cotton Mather and wife of the British Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu. Entire write up here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smallpox_variolation

I seriously doubt there is any one person on this forum that goes about their medical and nutritional care, as well as research, in the same exact fashion as others. I venture to guess the drive behind each person's approach would have to do with their own personal experience.

Get malpracticed on enough times, or witness it within your family, you learn that under no certain circumstances do you blindly trust a doctor. EVER. Their education, ego, and arrogance may not all fit into the room at once. It's particularly bad when ego enters the room first.

This is not to say there aren't fantastic doctors. There are many. But you have to work your way to find them. Some people are lucky and land on them right away. Others not so much.

Medicine is a PRACTICE. It's not a perfect. That means there is nearly always something for your Dr. to learn.

And there are people out there proving there are definitely some non conventional ways to treat debilitating disease. Either that, or they are humans that just simply defy the all the laws of biology, chemistry and physics. And I pretty much doubt that.

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Wed Sep 25, 2013 10:14 pm      Reply with quote
Lacy53 wrote:
aprile wrote:
Lacy,

Just to be clear - I am aware that ND's are not be considered traditional allopathic medical doctors, but they do indeed practice medicine, ableit a different brand of medicine. Some uneducated people might even consider them quacks or unqualified, but nothing could be further from the truth. them. Traditional allopathic medical doctors complete 3200 hours of training, while NDs complete 2800, but that's not a significant difference.
Best, Aprile Wink


Yes Aprile, I know you are aware that Naturopaths are alternative medicine practitioners; my comment was directed at uninformed readers of this thread.

It's "not a significant difference" ... why would you think that?

Take away all the hours spent learning about questionable medicine (such as homeopathy) and then calculate the number of hours spent learning factual information; I think you may change your opinion about significance. Don't forget that after medical school, doctors also complete their training under professional guidance while doing their residency/internship. That adds another 3 to 7 years to the education/training of MDs. Naturopaths don't do that.

"A different brand of medicine" is a very strange phrase. As far as I am concerned, there is only one kind of medicine: the kind that is scientifically proven to work. All the rest is just placebo and wishful thinking and falls under the umbrella of "alternative" medicine.


Lacy - before we begin to validate your thought process Can you please tell us your background or at least where you write from? UK, etc. It would be helpful to understand your position.

There are many kinds of medicine. Lacy - Any person in statistics will tell you that "scientifically proven to work is subject to evaluation. Just in case you weren't aware of that.
Your thinking might be narrow?.. just a little? When you consider "alternative modalities" have provided billions of dollars and now the lobbies want in on it. I think that tells all of us that the 'alternative umbrella' strikes a cord of value. Unfortunately it had to be in the realm of money to make it important to what you call standard medicine. All of the alternative modalities are gaining major steam and the more they do, the more the 'mainstream' wants in. Why do you think they want to regulate supplements? Not that they do such a great job of regulating what they have. ... heaven forbid. They want the money they see coming in on the billion dollar supplement business.

As Claudia has stated as time goes on .. what was considered unvalid can become valid over time. I would be carefull to poopoo things that others say works.

I suffer from major sinus - the only thing that works is acupuncture. I've had western model steroids, antibiotics, and major surgery. the only thing that works is acupuncture.

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Thu Sep 26, 2013 12:51 am      Reply with quote
Your comments on the supplement industry being a multi-billion dollar one are correct - and that is what it is driven by - money. We now have supplements for teen brain power, to aid women conceiving, men's sexual performance, to stop eye strain etc. etc. I wonder if they have done studies on whether children who are given "teen brain power" vitamins are smarter than those who haven't or is it just a money making ploy to suck in parents who want the best for their children and want them to do well at school.

Of course, health cures change over time. And what was considered unvalid becomes valid - but it also works the other way. Arsenic used to be applied to the face.

A neighbour of mine is currently overseas undergoing MMS therapy - something that is currently illegal here. She is seriously ill but is frightened of doctors (she needs surgery). So she has chosen to drink bleach in a foreign country - that's her decision - but it's an uninformed and dangerous one.

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Thu Sep 26, 2013 1:03 am      Reply with quote
Keliu wrote:
That would seem to make any discussion of whether doctors are trained in nutrition or graduated in the bottom half of their class redundant - as naturopaths aren't required to have any training in anything.


Heh heh. Naturopaths have to be trained. Wether you find a keen intelligent one or a complacent dull one, is by word of mouth or luck. But yes, they have to be trained.
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Thu Sep 26, 2013 1:20 am      Reply with quote
catski wrote:
Keliu wrote:
That would seem to make any discussion of whether doctors are trained in nutrition or graduated in the bottom half of their class redundant - as naturopaths aren't required to have any training in anything.


Heh heh. Naturopaths have to be trained. Wether you find a keen intelligent one or a complacent dull one, is by word of mouth or luck. But yes, they have to be trained.


No, I'm afraid they don't. In places where there is no regulation, someone with no training at all can call themselves a "naturopath". That is the point I'm making and is articulated in the link I posted earlier:

Quote:
The real problem is training. Although some four-year degree programs exist in naturopathy, there is no actual barrier to practise. That means that you could hang up a shingle as a naturopath and begin seeing patients tomorrow.
http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/40276.html


ETA: Just to note the position of the writer of the above article, which is:
Director of the Network of Researchers of Public Health in Complementary and Alternative Medicine at the University of Queensland.

So I'm presuming that his stance would be an un-biased one.

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Thu Sep 26, 2013 1:50 am      Reply with quote
In the uk there no laws yet to regulate Naturopaths currently although a few associations and some professional bodies that exist to "self regulate"

But here Keliu is right technically anyone could set up as a Naturopath and start a practice, the above bodies would not be happy but there is no reason to stop them or any legal power at all.

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Thu Sep 26, 2013 2:00 am      Reply with quote
10Sylvia5 wrote:
...technically anyone could set up as a Naturopath and start a practice, the above bodies would not be happy but there is no reason to stop them or any legal power at all.


That is the point that I was trying (unsuccessfully) to get across.

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Thu Sep 26, 2013 2:19 am      Reply with quote
Smile
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Thu Sep 26, 2013 6:27 am      Reply with quote
Lacy53 wrote:
aprile wrote:
Lacy,

Just to be clear - I am aware that ND's are not be considered traditional allopathic medical doctors, but they do indeed practice medicine, ableit a different brand of medicine. Some uneducated people might even consider them quacks or unqualified, but nothing could be further from the truth. them. Traditional allopathic medical doctors complete 3200 hours of training, while NDs complete 2800, but that's not a significant difference.
Best, Aprile Wink


Yes Aprile, I know you are aware that Naturopaths are alternative medicine practitioners; my comment was directed at uninformed readers of this thread.

It's "not a significant difference" ... why would you think that?

Take away all the hours spent learning about questionable medicine (such as homeopathy) and then calculate the number of hours spent learning factual information; I think you may change your opinion about significance. Don't forget that after medical school, doctors also complete their training under professional guidance while doing their residency/internship. That adds another 3 to 7 years to the education/training of MDs. Naturopaths don't do that.

"A different brand of medicine" is a very strange phrase. As far as I am concerned, there is only one kind of medicine: the kind that is scientifically proven to work. All the rest is just placebo and wishful thinking and falls under the umbrella of "alternative" medicine.
'


Lacy - I find your comments about homeopathy and alternative medicine being placed in the "placebo and wishful thinking" category as outrageous and insulting at best. It is a different kind of medicine, regardless of personal opinion about its effectiveness. In fact, its origins date back to the 1700s (see below). But to compare, vaccinations are based upon Pasteur's rightness of the germ theory of disease, which holds that germs attack the body from outside. Many felt that such tiny organisms as germs could not possibly kill larger ones such as humans. Pasteur now extended this theory to explain the causes of many diseases - including anthrax, cholera, TB and smallpox - and their prevention by vaccination. Fast forward to modern times and the pharmaceutical industry deciding to add a "healthy" dose of mercury to preserve those vaccinations and we see what they’ve created. In fact, many parents of children with autism questioned the role it could have played in their child being affected by the condition. Especially since they were given numerous vaccinations preserved with mercury spaced weeks apart as infants. I have a friend who noticed a distinct “change” in her own child after a specific vaccination was administered. He was later diagnosed with autism spectrum condition. Although the pharmaceutical companies would never admit any connection, mercury is a neurotoxin, and indeed autism is a neurological disorder. There was definitely a movement to have it removed from vaccines and eventually mercury is no longer used as a preservative. More and more people today are turning to alternative medicine because quite frankly they are fed up with standard protocols. They are also tired of knowing more than their physicians…. When questioning a physician as to whether or not a particular supplement might work for them, a common response might be, “I don’t know, try it – see if it works.” So ya think this comes off sounding very knowledgeable or professional? The same thing holds true for prescribed medications though… the reason why many physicians give for prescribing one medication over another is because “it seems to work for most patients.” OR so they say… But, that does not mean it is right for you. That is where naturopathic medicine differs with traditional medicine. Naturopathic medicine treats each patient as an individual. Also, Sis is correct that the pharmaceutical industry recognized a need and financial gain in supplements. In fact, that is the sole reason why the FDA wants to take away our supplements, NOT to monitor them. ~ Aprile

For those interested, below is a history of homeopathy:
Quote:
Homeopathy's roots emerge from the findings, teachings and writings of Dr. Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843). Hahnemann graduated from medical school in 1779 and started his own medical practice. He soon began his first homeopathic experiments in 1790, as a result of his disillusionment with such common medical practices of the day as purging, bloodletting, and the use of toxic chemicals. At one point, he gave up his own daily practice to begin working as a chemist while translating medical texts. It was when Hahnemann began working on a project to translate William Cullen's Materia Medica into German that he began his quest for a better way of providing healthcare using the principles of "Similars." While working on this project, he became fascinated with a species of South American tree-bark (cinchona) which was being used to treat malaria-induced fever. Hahnemann ingested the bark and discovered that it caused symptoms similar to malaria. He continued his research into "cures" and the idea of "similar suffering," and began compiling his findings. Similia similibus curentur, the Latin phrase meaning "let likes be cured by likes," is the primary principle of homeopathy. A homeopath searches for a substance that produces in a healthy person those same symptoms a patient experiences.

Students of Hahnemann founded the first homeopathic medical school in the United States in the late 1800’s. It gained recognition because of its success in treating the many disease epidemics rampant at the time — including scarlet fever, typhoid, cholera and yellow fever. The school’s method of treatment became very popular in the early 1900’s. At that time, there were 22 homeopathic medical schools, 100 homeopathic hospitals and over 1,000 homeopathic pharmacies. Boston University, Stanford University and New York Medical College were among those educational institutions that were teaching homeopathy. However, it was not long after this period of time (in the early 1920’s) that many of the schools closed — mostly due to the decline of homeopathy’s popularity which was greatly affected by the American Medical Association. This was also around the time when modern drug companies began releasing drugs that were easy to administer to patients, a trend that also contributed to the decline of homeopathy.
Although the United States experienced a dwindling interest in homeopathy in the 20th century, other nations, including countries in Europe and Asia, were experiencing a steady growth of homeopathic teachings and interest. Today, nearly all French pharmacies sell homeopathic remedies and medicines; and homeopathy has a particularly strong following in Russia, India, Switzerland, Mexico, Germany, Netherlands, Italy, England, and South America.

Homeopathy is also rising again in the United States. This resurgence has been documented by the National Center for Homeopathy in Virginia, which stated that Americans spent 230 million dollars on homeopathic remedies in 1996. It has also been said that sales are rising rapidly at about 12 – 15% each year. Doctors, scientists, researchers, corporations and the general public are all responsible for the accelerated expansion in the interest of homeopathic products, research and educational initiatives. A homeopath must undertake many years of study and clinical experience. Homeopaths can be medical doctors, and in the United States, many homeopaths are also chiropractors, naturopaths, osteopaths, nurse practitioners, dentists and veterinarians. Many training programs exist in North America today. See our directory for a list of homeopathic schools, organizations and other providers. The National Center for Homeopathy (NCH), in Alexandria, Virginia, can provide an updated list of new and developing programs in the United States.
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Thu Sep 26, 2013 7:38 am      Reply with quote
There was a program a little while ago on TV that spoke of Naturopaths. In the UK there is no laws to regulate naturopathy, and in fact even in the UK there are several different models of what people call “naturopathy”. One of the most alarming things they said in it was that many people do set themselves up as a qualified “Naturopath” and go out to practice but without insurance (because a lot of insurance companies won’t insure them with insufficient training). They filmed in secret a program maker going to naturopaths with made up symptons and had someone analyse what they were prescribed etc, and almost all of the tests that were carried out revealed that 3 out of the 5 people this person saw prescribed nothing but sugar and water pills that contained no other ingredients (they had sent it off to a laboratory for testing). One of them was based at an expensive street famous for its medical procedures and the initial visit and first prescription cost them some £350 alone for what was a “made up” condition.

It was a bit like WatchDog, but it was so funny as they tested all the stuff etc and got other opinions and then went and approached the various naturopaths that had treated the person with that evidence and all of them ran away. They then did an update and almost all had moved to the US and had opened up practices over there. It was too funny for me.

10Sylvia5 wrote:
In the uk there no laws yet to regulate Naturopaths currently although a few associations and some professional bodies that exist to "self regulate"

But here Keliu is right technically anyone could set up as a Naturopath and start a practice, the above bodies would not be happy but there is no reason to stop them or any legal power at all.
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Thu Sep 26, 2013 8:26 am      Reply with quote
that is soo much the problem with unregulated, "professions" that self-police or self regulate.
You just do not know who or what you are dealing with and absolutely no regress.

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Thu Sep 26, 2013 10:05 am      Reply with quote
The paragraph below can be found on page 11 of the insert apparently enclosed with the DPaT vaccine...

Anything in this list that would freak you out?

I was not given this insert when my twins were vaccinated. I did end up in ER with one of my boys because of a huge amount of fluid that was pushing through his soft spot... He was sent for a brain scan to look for pooling of fluids. Non found. We postponed his next shot, but I still conceded... they were preemies at the height of cold and flu season. Pertussis a deadly possibility. Again, swelling... this time resulting in a trip to SFSU to meet with a pedi neurologist... and a sedated CAT scan.

I was told that swelling of the brain or surrounding area is NORMAL for this shot. I'm not buying that. Messing with ones brain and surrounding fluids is not normal. And when the baby screams for hours... I personally think one should assume SCREAMING HEADACHE... most babies don't have a huge soft spot to alleviate the pressure.

The point? Science has proven effectiveness in eradication of major disease. And I get the necessity of that. However,mom's and dad's are prevented from being told what MIGHT happen to their child. And we are in fact seeing huge increases in brain issues. ADD, ADHD, Autism. Once upon a time you were clueless about these problems. If you saw a child acting "weird" you had no idea what you were looking at. Today, you just wait for official DX. Because you, the laymen, know what you're looking at.

I was never handed a 13 page document explaining the shot my child was given. Like I am when I pick up my thyroid meds.

Do some research on the vaccine program that Bill Gates is running overseas right now. And how a new vaccine sent too many children from the same village to hospitals. Human's aren't guinea pigs.

While you're at it... Research his TED Talk and his idea on what we need to do to REDUCE the population and therefore the negative impact humans are having on our planet.

His suggestion is with ]Good Medical, Good reproductive care, and Vaccines, the population will DECREASE.

I don't know, if you ask me... healthy people do a better job reproducing than sick people. Our ability to reproduce is not a disease. Pregnancy is not a disease.

Why would good healthcare cause a reduction in the human population?

And now Bill Gates, a computer guru, is in biz with Merck for their vaccine program. I've heard of diversifying. But this is just weird!

So here you go... straight from our gov't website regarding the DPaT shot given 5 times to an infant!

"Adverse events reported during post-approval use of Tripedia vaccine include idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, SIDS,
anaphylactic reaction, cellulitis, autism, convulsion/grand mal convulsion, encephalopathy, hypotonia, neuropathy, somnolence
and apnea. Events were included in this list because of the seriousness or frequency of reporting. Because these events are
reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequencies or to
establish a causal relationship to components of Tripedia vaccine."

Entire document found here: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/BiologicsBloodVaccines/Vaccines/ApprovedProducts/UCM101580.pdf

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Thu Sep 26, 2013 11:57 am      Reply with quote
10Sylvia5 wrote:
In the uk there no laws yet to regulate Naturopaths currently although a few associations and some professional bodies that exist to "self regulate"

But here Keliu is right technically anyone could set up as a Naturopath and start a practice, the above bodies would not be happy but there is no reason to stop them or any legal power at all.


Yes. people could lie and say they are qualified when they are not.

Naturopathy and alternative medicine is the only field in which this kind of malpractice can occur.

Nobody ever heard of a fake Medical doctor or dentist. Wink

A non - fake naturopath has to be trained.

A fake anything doesnt have to be trained.
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Thu Sep 26, 2013 12:01 pm      Reply with quote
TheresaMary wrote:
There was a program a little while ago on TV that spoke of Naturopaths. In the UK there is no laws to regulate naturopathy, and in fact even in the UK there are several different models of what people call “naturopathy”. One of the most alarming things they said in it was that many people do set themselves up as a qualified “Naturopath” and go out to practice but without insurance (because a lot of insurance companies won’t insure them with insufficient training). They filmed in secret a program maker going to naturopaths with made up symptons and had someone analyse what they were prescribed etc, and almost all of the tests that were carried out revealed that 3 out of the 5 people this person saw prescribed nothing but sugar and water pills that contained no other ingredients (they had sent it off to a laboratory for testing). One of them was based at an expensive street famous for its medical procedures and the initial visit and first prescription cost them some £350 alone for what was a “made up” condition.

It was a bit like WatchDog, but it was so funny as they tested all the stuff etc and got other opinions and then went and approached the various naturopaths that had treated the person with that evidence and all of them ran away. They then did an update and almost all had moved to the US and had opened up practices over there. It was too funny for me.

10Sylvia5 wrote:
In the uk there no laws yet to regulate Naturopaths currently although a few associations and some professional bodies that exist to "self regulate"

But here Keliu is right technically anyone could set up as a Naturopath and start a practice, the above bodies would not be happy but there is no reason to stop them or any legal power at all.


It does actually amaze that placebos are given so often by GP's and that they have in so many instances a higher rate of effectiveness than traditional medicine.
Remarkable, really, isnt it, how powerful the handing over of a prescription actually is, when the power of belief receives it.
I guess this is why EFT has worked so well, also, where medication has failed.
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Thu Sep 26, 2013 1:28 pm      Reply with quote
catski wrote:

It does actually amaze that placebos are given so often by GP's and that they have in so many instances a higher rate of effectiveness than traditional medicine.
Remarkable, really, isnt it, how powerful the handing over of a prescription actually is, when the power of belief receives it.
I guess this is why EFT has worked so well, also, where medication has failed.



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Thu Sep 26, 2013 3:10 pm      Reply with quote
An important read...

http://www.naturalnews.com/042227_HPV_vaccines_blood_donations_adverse_reactions.html#

A shocking new report reveals that receiving blood donated from someone vaccinated with Gardasil, the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine, may be downright dangerous to your health.

S.A.N.E. Vax, Inc., contracted with an independent lab which tested 13 Gardasil vials from 13 different lots from all over the world and found that the genetically modified HPV DNA strands present in Gardasil had firmly attached to the vaccination's aluminum adjuvant in a whopping 100% of the samples tested.

While natural HPV DNA does not stay in the bloodstream long, the aluminum binding allows the genetically modified recombinant HPV DNA (rDNA) to behave differently, potentially entering cells and wreaking havoc.

The vials were analyzed after a concerned parent contacted S.A.N.E. Vax, because her 13-year-old daughter developed an auto-immune reaction that would later be diagnosed as acute juvenile rheumatoid arthritis within 24 hours after receiving her third Gardasil vaccine. Two years following the incident, the girl's blood still tested positive for HPV DNA that should not be there. In fact, these strands have also been found in post-mortem samples as well, as in the case of teen Jasmine Renata, who died inexplicably in her sleep six months after receiving a Gardasil shot.

S.A.N.E. Vax points out that both Merck, the pharmaceutical company that manufactures Gardasil, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) claimed there was no viral DNA in Gardasil at the time of its "fast-tracked" approval. Milford Hospital Pathologist Dr. Sin Hang Lee, who analyzed the Gardasil vials, testified, "Undegraded viral and plasmid DNA fragments are known to activate macrophages, causing them to release tumor necrosis factor, a myocardial depressant which can induce lethal shock in animals and humans."

NaturalNews has previously reported that, by injecting a vaccine, any potentially toxic ingredients therein become much more harmful, because they are allowed to bypass the natural protections of the respiratory system and digestive tract. Dr. Lee noted, "DNA in an injectable protein-based vaccine may increase the risk of autoimmune disorders and gene mutation which may lead to malignancies."

Both Merck and the FDA should have been aware of this risk, but in fact, according to the official prescribing information for Gardasil, the vaccine "has not been evaluated for the potential to cause carcinogenicity or genotoxicity." Anyone who receives the Gardasil shot or allows administration to their children is taking a huge auto-immune disorder and/or cancer risk.

Vactruth's Sandy Lunoe wrote the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to ask about the potential dangers of blood transfusion recipients taking a Gardasil shot; the CDC responded that "the presence of DNA fragments is expected" and "Vaccination with Gardasil provides no known risk to the blood recipients or the blood donor." Lunoe notes that the CDC gave no evidence to support this statement.

Tom Fitton, president of watchdog Judicial Watch, wrote, "The FDA adverse event reports on the HPV vaccine read like a catalog of horrors."

Some of the adverse events include not only auto-immune disorders and cancer, but Guillain-Barre syndrome, paralysis, numbness, facial palsy, chronic pain, infertility, chronic fatigue syndrome and more. So many horrible reactions have occurred in the wake of Gardasil vaccinations that the Japanese government has withdrawn support and now requires the nation's medical professionals to warn patients who request Gardasil about the potential for adverse effects.

As of August 2013, S.A.N.E. Vax reports that HPV vaccines have caused over 30,000 adverse reactions, including 6,154 cases where the recipient did not recover, 975 cases where the recipient was disabled and 139 deaths. The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program has already awarded nearly $6 million in damages to Gardasil victims.

Despite the mounting evidence that Gardasil is dangerous, the FDA continues to maintain that Gardasil is safe and effective, and the National Institutes of Health even recently awarded the University of California nearly $550,000 to study new propaganda campaigns for pushing the shot on low-income minority parents.

This is also despite the fact that HPV itself does not cause cervical cancer. In addition, the CDC even admits that 90% of HPV is taken care of naturally by the body's immune system within two years. Key Gardasil developer Dr. Diane Harper has recently come out against the vaccine to clear her conscience, stating, "Gardasil has been associated with at least as many serious adverse events as there are deaths from cervical cancer developing each year."

In other words, thousands have been damaged by a vaccine that does not even provide any real health benefit.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/042227_HPV_vaccines_blood_donations_adverse_reactions.html#ixzz2g2LZx7Oo

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