Shop with us!!! We sell the most advanced skin care anti-aging cosmetics on the market: cellex-c, phytomer, sothys, dermalogica, md formulations, decleor, valmont, kinerase, yonka, jane iredale, thalgo, yon-ka, ahava, bioelements, jan marini, peter thomas roth, murad, ddf, orlane, glominerals, StriVectin SD.
 
 back to skin care discussion board front page with forums indexEDS Skin Care Forums Search the ForumSearch Most popular all-time Forum TopicsHot! Library
 Guidelines  FAQ  Register
Free gifts for Forum MembersForum Gifts Free Gifts offers at Essential Day SpaFree Gifts Offers  Log in



WARNING!!! Argireline Products

EDS Skin Care Forums Forum Index » Skin Care and Makeup Forum
Reply to topic
Author Message
wenrow
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 10 Jan 2006
Posts: 1189
Sat Feb 25, 2006 6:23 pm      Reply with quote
This is getting a lot of attention lately on another board and some really scary stories about the effects of it. Relaxing wrinkles but in the long run (even short run in some cases) causing sagging.
Also known as Acetyl Hexapeptide-3
So I am forwarding this post from another forum.
Since so many of us are willing to try new products because of the claims they make, we just need to be more aware and educate ourselves on it all. It is our faces after all. Just beware.

And here is another woman's horror story with it.
http://www.spectacularskin.com/cgi-bin/forum/index.cgi?read=61201

*************************************************
From spectacularskin.com:

Someone e-mailed me some articles on argireline. Thought I'd share:

Better than Botox? Bogus!
Cosmetic Cop Paula Begoun investigates the cosmetic products that promise better-than-botox results.
Avon
Anew Clinical Deep Crease Concentrate with Bo-Hylurox ($32 for 1 ounce) has a name not only reminiscent of Botox, but is advertised to make you wonder why anyone would subject themselves to an injection when they can achieve the same (or at least similar) results with this water-based serum. Sold with the scare-tactic tag line "Look stunning, not stunned," Avon's alternative to Botox claims to "reduce the overall length, depth and number of deep expression lines around your eyes, mouth and forehead, the areas that are in motion whenever you show emotion." Well, when done correctly, Botox injections absolutely do not make a person look stunned-the list of Hollywood celebrities who have had Botox injections is what's really stunning, and they don't look "stunned!" As one Hollywood plastic surgeon told me, if Botox was a problem half the town would be sick. Unlike genuine Botox injections, this Avon product absolutely cannot get rid of wrinkles.

Anew Clinical Deep Crease Concentrate contains two ingredients that are supposedly responsible for the crease-filling and wrinkle-smoothing. The first is Portulaca oleracea, a plant extract. Avon maintains it "helps you lose those hard-to-treat creases while keeping your facial expressions, naturally." However, there is no substantiated or published research showing Portulaca oleracea has that (or any) anti-wrinkle effect. Research has shown that it may have anti-inflammatory or analgesic properties, and it is also believed to be effective topically for wound healing (Sources: Journal of Ethopharmacology, October 2003, pages 131-136, and December 2000, pages 445-451). But none of that is related to treating expression lines in any way, shape, or form or duplicating Botox's effect on wrinkles. One study did examine Portulaca's effect on brain activity and resulting muscle relaxation, but the substance was used in a 10% concentration and injected into pigs' stomachs, quite different from applying lesser amounts of this ingredient to skin (Source: Journal of Ethnopharmacology, July 2001, pages 171-176).

The second hyped ingredient is acetyl hexapeptide-3 (trade name: argireline), which is described in detail in the DDF Wrinkle Relax review below.

DDF
Wrinkle Relax (previously known as Faux-Tox) ($75 for 0.5 ounce) is another Botox wannabe. This pricey product, which over a year's time wouldn't cost that much less than an actual Botox treatment, claims to contain a non-toxic, anti-aging peptide, chemically combined from naturally derived amino acids, [that] helps prevent fine lines induced by repeated facial movements without the loss of facial expression." And the results are supposed to be visible within two weeks. The miracle ingredient in this lightweight lotion is Argireline, which is the trade name for the synthetically derived peptide called acetyl hexapeptide-3. The company selling acetyl hexapeptide-3 is Centerchem (www.centerchem.com), an ingredient manufacuter based in Spain and, according to their Web site, "Argireline works through a unique mechanism which relaxes facial tension leading to a reduction in superficial facial lines and wrinkles with regular use. Argireline has been shown to moderate excessive catecholamines release." Other than Centerchem's assertions, there isn't a shred of research substantiating any part of it.

However, even if it were vaguely true, these effects would not be good news for your body because you wouldn't want any cosmetic without any safety data, efficacy documentation, or independent research messing around with your catecholamines. Catecholamines are compounds in the body that serve as neurotransmitters such as epinephrine, adrenaline, and dopamine. Epinephrine is a substance that prepares the body to handle emergencies such as cold, fatigue, and shock. A deficiency of dopamine in the brain is responsible for the symptoms of the Parkinson's. None of that sounds like something you want a cosmetic to inhibit or reduce. What if you accidentally overuse the product or apply too much? What is excessive for your body? The entire notion is more worrisome than almost anything I've encountered in my research thus far. However, the good news is that the physicians I've interviewed say this ingredient can't perform as DDF suggests.

Also available is DDF's Anti-Wrinkle Eye Renewal Treatment ($48 for kit). The kit includes four products, with the main attraction being the Anti-Wrinkle Dermal Gel, a water-based serum that contains the same "active" ingredient the company uses in their Wrinkle Relax product above, with equally suspect claims. In addition, there are clinical studies for Argireline revealing that this ingredient was not as effective as Botox (Source: www.cremedevie.com/clinical_details.htm). Again, this is not an ingredient to consider because there are too many unknowns about its effect on biological processes, not to mention its dubious anti-wrinkle claims.

Freeze 24/7

This New York-based company sells a small line of "works like Botox" products, all accompanied by the droll slogan "nature, not needles." Their products supposedly are formulated with TMRs (Topical Muscle Relaxers) that they claim can exert Botox-like effects every time you apply them. If their claims were true, this collection of products would render all of us completely wrinkle-free, and Allergan, the company that makes Botox Cosmetic(r), would go out of business. Besides, the ingredients in these products simply can't replace Botox or any other medical cosmetic corrective procedure. The main "active" ingredient touted by Freeze 24/7 is gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA). As I mentioned in the review above for Dr. Brandt's Crease Release, GABA is an amino acid that acts as a neurotransmitter inhibitor and is associated with reducing seizures and depression (Sources: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 2004, volume 548, pages 92-103; and Archives of General Psychiatry, July 2004, pages 705-713).

GABA's use in reducing the speed with which nerves fire (in the brain) is what companies such as Freeze 24/7 use to convince consumers they are buying the equivalent of topical Botox, with the logic being that topical GABA can influence the nerves that control muscles, selectively preventing muscle contractions. If GABA can stop nerves from firing in the brain, maybe it isn't a stretch to assume it could do that for the nerves that cause muscle movement, thus diminishing expression lines without (and this is almost becoming a cliché "painful injections." However, aside from the fact that there is absolutely no research showing that to be the case, even when taken orally GABA does not work alone to prevent seizures or lessen depression. Many other components found in the body are required for it to function (Source: www.emedicine.com, www.emedicine.com/neuro/topic692.htm#section~gaba_reuptake_inhibitors). You simply can't get GABA to act like that when it's applied topically. Just supposing you could, what would prevent GABA from causing the muscles in your hand not to move? After all, you are applying the stuff with your fingers. Now that would be a problem!

The Freeze 24/7 range consists of EyeCicles ($95 for 0.5 ounce), Freeze 24/7 ($95 for 1 ounce), and IceCream ($80 for 1.7 ounces; this product also contains the questionable ingredient acetyl hexapeptide-3 reviewed above). None of these overpriced products are recommended.

(c) Copyright 2005 by Paula Begoun.

About Us | Terms of Use | Advertising | Contact Us | Links
Copyright © 2004 VG Systems Consulting Inc
kittylove
Senior Member
10% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 09 Jan 2006
Posts: 72
Sat Feb 25, 2006 6:51 pm      Reply with quote
Thank you for this.
A while back I started to keep the boxes that my products come in because that is where the ingredients are listed. When I hear of something like this I can double check...
Like one of the posters on that forum I also recieved the Anew Clinical Deep Crease Concentrate from Avon. I guess I'll be tossing that!!!....I smell a refund as well... Neutral
Mabsy
Moderator

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
Posts: 9624
Sat Feb 25, 2006 7:35 pm      Reply with quote
Again, as I replied to your other thread, please also have a look at this rather comprehensive previous discussion of this topic: http://www.essentialdayspa.com/forum/viewthread.php?tid=5648

_________________
37, NW20, combination skin that is a bit neglected and stressed out at the moment
kittylove
Senior Member
10% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 09 Jan 2006
Posts: 72
Sat Feb 25, 2006 7:59 pm      Reply with quote
Embarassed
m.april
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 17 Feb 2005
Posts: 1135
Sat Feb 25, 2006 8:06 pm      Reply with quote
The anecdote sounds more like a case of Bell's Palsy to me, especially since the drooping occurred on only one side of her face. Bell's Palsy is relatively common, and has many possible and varied causes. Onset is quick and sudden, without much warning. Also, it occurs most often in mature people, and the woman in the anecdote is presumably older since she's using anti-aging/wrinkle products. I doubt if she applies them to only one side of her face.

Having said all that, I don't think we can be too cautious about what we put on our skin. Several medicines are administered transdermally, and many cosmetic/skincare products have ingredients to help facilitate absorption. The woman said she was thoroughly checked out by medical professionals and spent $10,000 to correct the problem, so I'd think/hope a facelift wouldn't have been performed if it were a case of Bell's Palsy. Then again, there are some very aggressive docs out there trying to cash in on the vain and aging population.

I can't help but be a little skeptical -- argiriline products are widely used. If they truly caused this type of problem, I'd think we'd be hearing many more stories like this. But I could be wrong. Perhaps argiriline can trigger something like Bell's Palsy in susceptible people. It is, after all, a neurological condition and argiriline works by essentially numbing the area to which it's applied.
Mabsy
Moderator

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
Posts: 9624
Sun Feb 26, 2006 12:52 am      Reply with quote
I'm sceptical for the same reasons. Also, given how widely used it is one would think that it would be banned if it was shown to have a bad effect (or maybe I'm naive). I posted a link to that previous discussion because I think there is some interesting info there on how argireline causing sagging is not actually possible, with info also on sources that says that it does.

I'm also sceptical because this came from Paula Begoun Embarassed but I won't get into that discussion.... Angel

HTH

ETA, Here's another past thread on the article as well that might give you some additional info: http://www.essentialdayspa.com/forum/viewthread.php?tid=9690

_________________
37, NW20, combination skin that is a bit neglected and stressed out at the moment
mermaid7000
Senior Member
10% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 19 Feb 2006
Posts: 85
Sun Feb 26, 2006 8:37 am      Reply with quote
Well I'm not doubting that person's claims that it could have been caused by one of those products, but all I know is I've tried 10% Argireline products for 2 months and Dermafreeze with GABA and they only made my forehead numb for like 5 seconds and did nothing after that. I know they do work for some people though so its one of those things that they work for some and not others. But one thing I will say is when I put the Dermafreeze on my forehead MY FOREHEAD ONLY WAS NUMB for that 3 seconds. No where else!! So I have to disagree that it would be affecting the rest of your body if you put it in only one area. These people that did receive the facial sagging (if it were caused by that) most likely put it all over their face. But this thing is most likely a drastic case scenario. For instance, I know lots of people that absolutely LOVE Botox and have had excellent results, but you go to the Botox Message Forum and all you here is horror stories from bad side effects, so go figure.

One thing I'm curious about though, is why Botox wouldn't cause facial sagging in the long run due to the muscles being paralazed for such a long time, wouldn't they atrophy and cause sagging??
hpjrt
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 18 Nov 2004
Posts: 872
Sun Feb 26, 2006 9:15 am      Reply with quote
I'm with Katee and Mabsby as well. I really detest this sort of fear mongering.

I suspect that part of Ms. Begoun's objection stems from her not having a product containing this ingredient! Laughing

She lost a great deal of credibility for me when she launched her own products. So let's not forget she's scarcely an "unbiased critic". Laughing

From my perspective, injecting botulism under my skin seems far more objectionable than any OTC product! I'm not saying that Botox isn't safe ... I just know I'm not going to be paying for it any time soon! Laughing

Mary

_________________
Over 50, combo, OCM. Originator of Pearl Paste ... www.silkenpearl.com
Chrissie
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 23 Dec 2005
Posts: 1065
Sun Feb 26, 2006 2:41 pm      Reply with quote
hpjrt wrote:

I suspect that part of Ms. Begoun's objection stems from her not having a product containing this ingredient! Laughing


made me laugh out loud Laughing Laughing Laughing

_________________
46 yrs old, I live at the beach and love being out in the sun.
betterat40
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 05 May 2004
Posts: 1148
Sun Feb 26, 2006 6:57 pm      Reply with quote
Totally agree with Mabsy and hpjrt. If Paula had a product with argerline in it, she would have a different opinion. And, your other point about botox is what I have always thought when I see this sort of hysterical crap posted on different boards. How is it that a topical 10% (maybe) concentration of argerline could be so powerful, yet Botox, (which actually paralyzes the muscles by poisoning all the nerve endings so they have to regenerate themselves)would NOT cause facial sagging. It simply defies logic.

By the way, just way that Elizabeth Arden has added an argeriline product to their line:

Elizabeth Arden Ceramide Plump Perfect Targeted Line Concentrate

Target your wrinkles with surgical precision. With 4 times the Argireline of the other plump products, Ceramide Plump Perfect Concentrate immediately powers away the wrinkles you see and helps discourage new ones from forming. Within one week, the depth of lines and wrinkles are minimized and skin is strengthened to resist further wrinkles. Unique packaging allows precise application of concentrated Argireline with surgical precision.

CAA005

$65.00

Somehow I just can't believe that they would touch an ingredient that had a rep for causing facial sagging.

By the way, $65.00 is way too much to pay for wrinkle relaxers....Relax-A-Line is $24.
bushy
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 30 Nov 2004
Posts: 2217
Mon Feb 27, 2006 2:57 am      Reply with quote
I believe the major point to consider with products containing argireline is that the application should be specifically applied only to the wrinkle.
When botox is applied it is a very targeted procedure.
Many, but not all, suppliers of argireline products advise applying the product only to the lines/wrinkles and not all over the face. Used in this manner it should be ok.

_________________
Skin: Over 50, combination & prone to breakouts, oily t-zone, fair, tans easily.
sharky
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 01 Apr 2005
Posts: 1408
Mon Feb 27, 2006 8:57 am      Reply with quote
I agree bushy. There are plenty of articles on MEDLINE about sagging and improper use of BOTOX. Argireline is weaker but I wouldn't be putting it all over my face. I don't believe the scare stories but what I've read in real Medical liturature suggests 20 years of all over use might have bad effects. I like to use things like Matrixyl,green tea extract, carnosine, glycolic, Vit C etc that actually stimulate skin repair rather than temporarily hide a wrinkle. I also think that there will be many good things coming soon that do not accelerate turnover but make cells stay young longer green tea and carnosine have some of this effect.


Also I don't get the overall creams that contain both Argireline and DMAE.
Although the action of each is not truely understood some of the peptides supposedly moderate acetylcholine release and DMAE in real published articles is shown to increase acetylcholine.
belledivine67
Senior Member
10% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 02 Feb 2005
Posts: 191
Mon Feb 27, 2006 2:03 pm      Reply with quote
Another point to consider about Botox....
I had scheduled an appointment for the procedure, assuming that I would have the procedure done three times a year (or approximately $900.00 of "upkeep"). A relatively small price to pay for a bit of extended youth. At any rate, I could not wait to go under the needle.....until I was made aware of a waiver that I would have to sign. To paraphrase, the purpose of the waiver was to inform me that Botox is acutally derived from a component of human blood. Therefore, the safety of Botox can be linked to the relative safety of our blood supply. A theoretical risk exists for the receipt of any tainted material. Since I am a hypochondriac, I decided to cancel my much anticipated Botox appointment. Thus, my plans for eternal youth have been thwarted. I just know myself too well....I would end up obsessing about whether or not I could POSSIBLY recieve tainted Botox.
I guess the celebs / millions of others who do this are able to ignore this nagging little possibility. I wish that I could....sigh... Maybe someday, as my laugh lines become difficult to ignore.
sharky
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 01 Apr 2005
Posts: 1408
Mon Feb 27, 2006 4:08 pm      Reply with quote
I would be worried about this. At childbirth I had major surgery. I was in some trouble so it was anticipated. I wanted ahead of time to stockpile blood. The MDs said "foolish" so I did not. After many many pints of blood and 3 surgeries I went home. Three years later I got a letter saying that one of my blood donors has Hepatitis C and HIV positive. Luckily the tests proved negative but it was a horrible 2 weeks (and there is a slight chance that I still could have something).
snowymtn
Senior Member
10% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 18 Oct 2005
Posts: 171
Mon Feb 27, 2006 4:33 pm      Reply with quote
I dont use this but if I did I would apply at the botox injection points for the area. ie when you get botox they dont inject the actual wrinkle, but specific points of the affected muscle.
jujus
New Member

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 19 Oct 2012
Posts: 1
Fri Oct 19, 2012 11:31 am      Reply with quote
I purchased Hydroxatone after reading the hype which sounded pretty good.
Weird, after it arrived, I started to read the ingredients and search on Argireline.
Thank goodness I found your forum and many other comments. What, more wrinkles, I don't think so...
Thanks everyone for the info.
gottaHAVEitALL
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 17 Feb 2006
Posts: 345
Fri Oct 19, 2012 12:38 pm      Reply with quote
Mabsy wrote:
I'm also sceptical because this came from Paula Begoun Embarassed but I won't get into that discussion.... Angel


Finally! Someone who shares my opinion of Paula Begoun!!!!

_________________
Makeup and skincare are my passion!! My dayjob is just to pay for the obsession...
System
Automatic Message
Fri Oct 24, 2014 12:00 am
If this is your first visit to the EDS Forums please take the time to register. Registration is required for you to post on the forums. Registration will also give you the ability to track messages of interest, send private messages to other users, participate in Gift Certificates draws and enjoy automatic discounts for shopping at our online store. Registration is free and takes just a few seconds to complete.

Click Here to join our community.

If you are already a registered member on the forums, please login to gain full access to the site.

Reply to topic



Fake Bake Bronzy Babe Pressed Powder (11 g / 0.39 oz) Juice Beauty Blemish Clearing Mask (50 ml /  1.7 floz) Donell A+Q10 Cream (2.5 oz)