Shop with us!!! We sell the most advanced skin care anti-aging cosmetics on the market: cellex-c, phytomer, sothys, dermalogica, md formulations, decleor, valmont, kinerase, yonka, jane iredale, thalgo, yon-ka, ahava, bioelements, jan marini, peter thomas roth, murad, ddf, orlane, glominerals, StriVectin SD.
 
 back to skin care discussion board front page with forums indexEDS Skin Care Forums Search the ForumSearch Most popular all-time Forum TopicsHot! Library
 Guidelines  FAQ  Register
Free gifts for Forum MembersForum Gifts Free Gifts offers at Essential Day SpaFree Gifts Offers  Log in



DDF Nourishing Eye Cream (14 g / 0.5 oz) Carita Ideal Cotton Serum (30 ml / 1 oz) Bremenn Rosacea Redness Rehab (30 ml / 1 floz)
Study suggests: - Skin cream can make skin drier

EDS Skin Care Forums Forum Index » Skin Care and Makeup Forum
Reply to topic
Author Message
Septembergirl
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 11 Apr 2008
Posts: 1371
Thu Oct 23, 2008 12:35 pm      Reply with quote
A new study from a Swedish University shows that

- skin cream can make skin drier
- both vegetable and mineral oils resulted in the skin being less able to cope with external stresses
- treatment with a complex cream compound resulted in more resistant skin without dryness

Here is the article:

Quote:
ScienceDaily (Oct 23, 2008) - Many people have noticed that as soon as you start using a skin cream, you have to continue with it; if you stop lubricating, your skin becomes drier than when you started.

And now there is research to confirm for the first time that normal skin can become drier from creams.

Izabela Buraczewska presents these findings in the dissertation she is publicly defending at Uppsala University in Sweden on October 24.

The findings in Izabela Buraczewska's dissertation confirm what many have suspected: Creams can make the skin drier. She has studied what happens in the skin at the molecular level and also what positive and negative effects creams have on the skin. Her research shows that differences in the pH of creams do not seem to play any role.

Different oils were also studied in a seven-week treatment period, but no difference was established between mineral oil and vegetable oil. Both oils resulted in the skin being less able to cope with external stresses. Treatment with a more complex cream compound, however, resulted in more resistant skin with no signs of dryness.


Tissues samples taken from the treated skin areas also show that the weakening of the skin's protective barrier can be tied to changes in the activity of certain genes involved in producing skin fats, among other functions.

The conclusion is that the contents of the creams impact these effects on the skin. This knowledge enhances our potential to develop creams that reinforce the skin's protective barrier in a positive way, without making the skin drier. Such creams would mean that various groups of patients with dry skin,for example eczema and ichtyosis, could enjoy a better quality of life.

"My findings show that creams differ, and that knowledge of the effects of various ingredients is important for us to be able to tailor the treatment to various skin types," said Izabela Buraczewska.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081022101500.htm


_________________
Female, 40, Norway. Normal/dry skin, starting to see signs of aging. Staples: Glycolic acid cleanser, SkinCeuticals Phloretin CF, Revaleskin, NIA24.
bethany
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 08 Apr 2008
Posts: 8264
Thu Oct 23, 2008 8:16 pm      Reply with quote
Here is a little more info on that study, though it doesn't mentioned the oils tested. Sad

http://publications.uu.se/theses/spikblad.xsql?dbid=9300

And here is something that mentions types of oils that she tested in the past:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17300239


Dr. Obagi mentioned this is his dermatology textbook from 10 years ago...he said that skin developed an addiction, and that the skin of women who used moisturizers regularly actually aged faster.

I wonder if emu would provoke the same response?

_________________
Not posting here as much; PM me if you need info on my favs: Epionce, Environ, Merbe, Tua Tre'nd, BioWave. Not affiliated with any vendor.
nickieygirl
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 26 Dec 2006
Posts: 950
Fri Oct 24, 2008 2:10 am      Reply with quote
It's such an amazing information. Thanks for sharing.
simran
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 06 Jul 2007
Posts: 1080
Fri Oct 24, 2008 3:23 am      Reply with quote
So what does this mean? Do we stop using moisturizers altogether? And I don't understand what it means by that compound cream thing yikes plz explain? Where can I get it, I certainly don't want to age faster. I thought I was doing the right thing all this time by making sure I moiturize ........ M sooooo confused!

_________________
age 24 .. skin varies from dry to normal with the odd breakout now and then. skin color best i can describe is light golden brown..tans easily
Septembergirl
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 11 Apr 2008
Posts: 1371
Fri Oct 24, 2008 4:26 am      Reply with quote
My take on this is that a cream compound with the "right" ingredients (she does not identify which ones) will work better than simpler formulas and plain mineral oils and vegetable oils.

_________________
Female, 40, Norway. Normal/dry skin, starting to see signs of aging. Staples: Glycolic acid cleanser, SkinCeuticals Phloretin CF, Revaleskin, NIA24.
lunathefinal
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 07 Sep 2008
Posts: 477
Fri Oct 24, 2008 6:27 am      Reply with quote
Septembergirl wrote:
My take on this is that a cream compound with the "right" ingredients (she does not identify which ones) will work better than simpler formulas and plain mineral oils and vegetable oils.

I just hope the article could be more specific... Embarassed
Nimue
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 12 Aug 2007
Posts: 1646
Fri Oct 24, 2008 9:37 am      Reply with quote
I want to know what vegetable oils were used. I want to know more! This is so confusing, frustrating. The *only* thing I really know is sunscreen is a must, and that's it really.

_________________
24 yrs old. favorite sunscreen right now: Burnout
NOTCH
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 23 May 2008
Posts: 287
Fri Oct 24, 2008 9:41 am      Reply with quote
I am so glad you posted this article Septembergirl, because the conclusion is what I've been preaching for years.... read the ingredients label and know what you are purchasing!! This study validates the types of formulas that I make and sell 100%.

Let me add more to this post:

The skin's barrier function is made up of both dead skin cells, and a "lipid" fluid that flows between the cells. Cosmetic chemists often refer to this as "bricks and mortar". The bricks are the dead skin cells, and the mortar is the fluid called "sebum" made up of certain fatty acids, esters, cholestrol, ceramides, phytosterols and other lesser components in various loading percentages. Sebum is the natural oil of the skin that keeps it supple, soft, hydrated, and young.

Now, certain raw materials in cosmetic formulas can actually "strip" the skin lipids away from the skin actually increasing transepidermal water loss (called TEWL, in the study). When the skin's sebum is stripped away, the natural water in your skin simply evaporates out, making it dry, cracked and easy to age. So, the study is truthful in my opinion and believable. I've done TEWL studies on countless formulas and raw materials over the years, and yes, certain raw materials are good, and some are stripping. I have an entire list of botanical oils, both triglycerides and wax esters, in order of their ability to trap moisture on the skin. I use this list as a guide when I formulate.

It should also be stated that glycerin, in the right loading level in a formula, can draw moisture to the skin. BUT, if it is overloaded (an easy mistake for overzealous formulators), then it can actually draw moisture up and OUT of the skin, making it dryer. So, if "glycerin" is on the label very near the top of the list, or at the top of the list, then it is probably overloaded.

There have been studies on the composition of the fatty acids and esters in the human skin sebum. They are very well defined, and they can be "simulated" by botanical and animal based raw materials in cosmetic lotions and creams. THESE are the ingredients you should look for when hunting for creams and lotions that are "moisturizing" rather than "stripping" to the skin.

Someone mentioned "Emu" oil, and yes, Emu does have a fatty acid profile very similar to that of human skin. HOWEVER, my problem with Emu is that it is also high in polyunsaturated fatty acids, which means it can go rancid easily. If you don't believe me, put a piece of greasy chicken on the kitchen counter for a few days and then smell it....(Emu is a bird too, just like chicken).

If you want natural, botanical alternatives there are two that are fantastic. First, there is Macadamia Oil, which has the most similar fatty acid profile to skin sebum of most of the plant triglyceride oils. Anything with macadamia in it will be soothing to the skin, refatting, moisturizing, and will REDUCE transepidermal water loss. I even put macadamia oil derivatives in my moisturizing self tanning formula because virtually ALL self tanning formulas on the market today are skin "stripping". All of them! Mine is the ONLY one that is moisturizing to the skin at the same time!

Next, you want ANYTHING with jojoba oil, or jojoba oil derivatives in it because the wax ester composition of jojoba oil is pratically identical to the esters in human skin. Plus, studies have shown that jojoba esters are extremely "occlusive". Occlusive means that it actually traps moisture at the skin surface thus REDUCING transepidermal water loss to extremely low levels. Jojoba Esters are actually more occlusive than the cosmetic industry standard "petrolatum" or vaseline...but most big cosmetic houses use petrolatum as their occlusive ingredient rather than jojoba because petrolatum is so cheap!! What would you rather have on your skin, greasy, pore clogging, mineral based petrolatum, or skin friendly, quickly absorbed, and super dry jojoba oil??

For those that have tried Gold Bond Ultimate Healing Lotion, you already know what I'm talking about. They ran with the Jojoba Esters technology, combined with glycerin to draw moisture to the skin and keep it there. This product is one of the best moisturizers on the market today.

But, my products use ALL of the good materials and concepts that I've stated above, and that is why we have 100% satisfaction on all of our ebaY sales. I would love the author of that study to try my formulas. I have no doubt (because I've already done the TEWL studies) that she would find my formulas highly moisturizing and reducing the TEWL on the skin.

If you have any more questions on this subject, don't hesitate to ask me, because this is precisely my field of expertise, and the keystone to all of the cosmetic products that I make.

John
sahmisme
Senior Member
10% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 02 Oct 2008
Posts: 111
Fri Oct 24, 2008 9:51 am      Reply with quote
So are you here to sell stuff? Embarassed


Well I'm so confused with conflicting information that we get with absolutely everything. I mean you read that you're supposed to do one thing so you do it religiously and then you read that you've been harming yourself, etc. etc.

It's enough to make you .. Brick wall

_________________
36 year old mother of 2, oily skin, prone to break outs, wrinkles around the eyes, forehead wrinkles and laugh lines
NOTCH
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 23 May 2008
Posts: 287
Fri Oct 24, 2008 10:13 am      Reply with quote
My main purpose on this board is to share information only. I wish I could mention my products by name, but according to forum rules, I cannot do that here in the threads. If you want to know more, you have to private message me here...


NOW, Let me add MORE information (can you tell that I'm excited about this topic?!!)

There is an entire class of cosmetic raw materials called "emulsifiers". Virtually every cream and lotion made has emulsifiers in them....and almost every one is synthetic chemicals. There are only two "natural based" emulsifier systems that I know, and I'll tell you about them shortly.

What you need to know about the emulsifier ingredients is this, their sole purpose is to mix oil and water together and keep them mixed. This is the basis for every cream and lotion made....oil in water, or water in oil emulsions.

Now think about this, your skin sebum is essentially oils, made of fatty acids, esters, cholesterol, ceramides, phystosterols, squalene, etc. When you put certain lotions on with strong synthetic emulsifier systems in them, they essentially dissolve your own natural oils and make them water soluble....thus when you wash, your natural sebum gets washed away. This is another process by which your skin can actually be made dryer by cosmetic creams and lotions.

The only two natural emulsifier systems that I know of are the "Olivem" series made by the company B & T, and a jojoba esters based version that I created while working for a jojoba, macadamia, sunflower oil supplier. At that time we were the only ones that knew of and used the jojoba based system. It was so good, that I actually resigned from that company and started my own based on this new emulsifier system. B & T's emulsifier system is made from olive oil derivatives which is also very good. They contain squalene, which is a natural component of skin sebum. As a matter of fact, the next launch from my company will be a cream that is tentatively called "Living Lotion". It will contain the jojoba based emulsifier as well as the B & T Olivem. It will also contain jojoba esters and macadamia oil as well as a small percentage of glycerin. It will be as close in composition to actual human sebum as can be manufactured. It will launch in early 2009.

Now, you are probably asking why haven't the big cosmetic houses already used the jojoba based emulsifier system. Well, when I worked for the other company we shopped it around all over the world. Virtually all of the cosmetic chemists who saw it loved it. BUT, the price is too high for them to use it. That's the truth, they would come back to us and say they can use synthetic emulsifiers for just pennies per kilogram, why should they buy this stuff at dollars per kilogram. They would lose profit. That was so frustrating to me that this was another reason why I resigned and started my own company. The good products that you should be able to buy weren't being produced because not enough profit could be made, and that is sacrilegious in my opinion.

More information to come!!

John
Stardustdy
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 22 Jul 2005
Posts: 1569
Fri Oct 24, 2008 10:19 am      Reply with quote
So is it only restricted to vegetable & mineral oils? What about those essential or fruit oils?

sigh.......so what should we use now? And what about serums? Confused
bethany
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 08 Apr 2008
Posts: 8264
Fri Oct 24, 2008 10:31 am      Reply with quote
NOTCH wrote:
My main purpose on this board is to share information only. I wish I could mention my products by name, but according to forum rules, I cannot do that here in the threads. If you want to know more, you have to private message me here...

John


John, vendors are welcome to participate in sharing information, but not to promote their products for obvious reasons.

However, in the spirit of full disclosure you should ALWAYS include your name AND company name in your signature line so that we can assess your comments in the appropriate context.

If you could add that info by updating the signature line in your profile, we would greatly appreciate it.

_________________
Not posting here as much; PM me if you need info on my favs: Epionce, Environ, Merbe, Tua Tre'nd, BioWave. Not affiliated with any vendor.
bethany
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 08 Apr 2008
Posts: 8264
Fri Oct 24, 2008 10:33 am      Reply with quote
NOTCH wrote:
The only two natural emulsifier systems that I know of are the "Olivem" series made by the company B & T, and a jojoba esters based version that I created while working for a jojoba, macadamia, sunflower oil supplier. At that time we were the only ones that knew of and used the jojoba based system. It was so good, that I actually resigned from that company and started my own based on this new emulsifier system. B & T's emulsifier system is made from olive oil derivatives which is also very good. They contain squalene, which is a natural component of skin sebum. As a matter of fact, the next launch from my company will be a cream that is tentatively called "Living Lotion". It will contain the jojoba based emulsifier as well as the B & T Olivem. It will also contain jojoba esters and macadamia oil as well as a small percentage of glycerin. It will be as close in composition to actual human sebum as can be manufactured. It will launch in early 2009.


The 302 Skincare products also contain jojoba esters.

_________________
Not posting here as much; PM me if you need info on my favs: Epionce, Environ, Merbe, Tua Tre'nd, BioWave. Not affiliated with any vendor.
Nimue
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 12 Aug 2007
Posts: 1646
Fri Oct 24, 2008 11:31 am      Reply with quote
Now my question is, is avocado a vegetable? So is avocado oil a vegetable oil? Or by vegetable oil, is that also supposed to apply to plants from all kinds of fruits, plants, etc?

_________________
24 yrs old. favorite sunscreen right now: Burnout
doodles
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 02 Oct 2005
Posts: 317
Fri Oct 24, 2008 11:55 am      Reply with quote
Hi John,
Can you tell me what the maximum percentage of glycerin is that you want to see in a formula?. Also, what about aloe gel - is it ok?. Or glycerin in an aloe based formula?. I can't use any oils on my skin including jojoba. They don't sink in no matter how small of an amount I use. I tried to use a couple of drops of jojoba as a moisturizer under my tazorac and it seemed to be working but a couple of days later I had some cysts to deal with. Lotions or creams with glycerin don't sink in either (and they make my skin super oily) but they don't make be break out so they are ok under the tazorac at night. Any info would be appreciated as I need to use some kind of moisturizer because the taz is so drying. TIA.
NOTCH
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 23 May 2008
Posts: 287
Fri Oct 24, 2008 12:02 pm      Reply with quote
The forum seems to be giving me trouble posting topics all of a sudden. I hope this reply gets through...

doodles, for you I would recommend something with macadamia oil in it. The INCI name will be Macadamia Integrifolia (seed) oil on the label. It is a very dry emollient that should penetrate easily for you, and not cause break outs.

John
carforum
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 23 Nov 2006
Posts: 266
Fri Oct 24, 2008 1:13 pm      Reply with quote
That's true I think. I remember when I was 23, I did not use any skincare, and my skin are in good condition. However, when I started using some cream on my face, I can't stop using it, because I feel dry if I don't put any cream on my face.

_________________
-------My skin type = Dry skin--------
simran
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 06 Jul 2007
Posts: 1080
Fri Oct 24, 2008 2:38 pm      Reply with quote
what about camellia oil? And what about products that contain active ingrediants of sea water? For example Phytomer Products. The moisturizer that i am currently using is from that line i.e "Hydracontinue Instant Moisture cream" http://www.essentialdayspa.com/phytomer-hydracontinue-in-p_1935.htm

I just looked at its ingrediant list and it does have glycerin which is fourth on the list and macadamia ternifolia seed oil....which is half way in the list.

Ingredients
Water, cetearyl ethylhexanoate, cocoglycerides, coco-caprylate/caprate, glycerin, glycerin (and) water (and) hydrolyzed milk protein (and) lactoglobulin, propylene glycol, palmitic acid (and) stearic acid, glyceryl stearate, diisopropyl dimer dilinoleate, peg-20 methyl glucose sesquistearate, macadamia ternifolia seed oil, dimethcone, silica, water (and) hydrolyzed algin (and) chlorella vulgaris extract (and) sea water, triethanolamine, methyl clucose sesquistearate, cetyl alcohol, chlorphenesin (and)methylparaben, carbomer, polymethyl methacrylate (and) ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate, triclosan (and) butylparaben, fragrance, perfluorodecalin, xanthan gum, caprylic/capric triglyceride (and) propyl gallate (and) citric acid (and) tocopherol, yellow 5, red 33, blue 1.


so m i on the right track? Confused

_________________
age 24 .. skin varies from dry to normal with the odd breakout now and then. skin color best i can describe is light golden brown..tans easily
Stardustdy
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 22 Jul 2005
Posts: 1569
Fri Oct 24, 2008 7:57 pm      Reply with quote
So Notch, what about cocoa butter then? Or those fruit or essential oil? Vit E oil then? Would that be drying to the skin?

So u r saying that macadamia and jojoba oil actually trap moisture in. But if they're the main ingredients, would it cause clogged pores? Confused
NOTCH
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 23 May 2008
Posts: 287
Fri Oct 24, 2008 9:27 pm      Reply with quote
simran, I'll get back to looking at the individual ingredients in that list tomorrow, it's getting late out here.

Stardusty, cocoa butter is also considered a botanical, triglyceride oil type raw material. I think too many consumers today are fixated on the term "essential oil", and it is being misused quite regularly. I'll do a search tomorrow and find a fitting definition of what really is and "essential oil" and I think you will be quite surprised and how few true essential oils there are.

Vitamin E "oil" is quite accurately known as "Tocopherols" and that is the name that should be correctly used on the label. Tocopherols is just a small fraction in some plants. The oils that plants naturally produce contain a small amount of tocopherols in them as a protective device. Its the natural antioxidant for the plant. There isn't a botanical tree or plant called a "Tocopherol tree" or "vitemain E tree". Vitamin E is quite nourishing to the skin, and probably is not drying.

One thing I do want to emphasize is that both macadamia oil and jojoba oil are non-comedagenic. That is, they easily penetrate the skin and virtually never clog skin pores. The reason they are "occlusive" and trap moisture in is because they actually fortify, and enhance the natural skin sebum you already have, thus making it harder for moisture (water) to get through this built up barrier. Very rarely will you find anyone who has problems using macadamia oil and jojoba oil. That's because these products are so very similar to skin sebum. And, the old adage goes, "like dissolves like". So it is very compatible with the skin, not foreign like synthetic emollients and esters would be that can clog the skin pores.

John
leeleedeedee
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 22 Feb 2003
Posts: 1057
Sat Oct 25, 2008 6:24 am      Reply with quote
I have just read the ingredient lists on some of the more popular products from two skin care lines that are talked about alot on this forum: Zo Skin Health and Karin Herzog and with both lines "glycerin" is an ingredient at the top of the list in many of their products.

So - what does that mean??? That these products are likely to make your skin drier instead of actually improving it?

That's very confusing and would acutally mean that these products would be a complete waste of money.

There sure needs to be alot more clarification on just what ingredients improve the skin and what are harmful.

Are macadamia nut oil and jojoba esters the only two therapeutic ingredients out there??

To say that I'm confused is an understatement. Just when you think you're doing everything right (and spending tons of money to get things right) you find out that you may be harming your skin. Not a pleasant thought!!
NOTCH
Preferred Member
15% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 23 May 2008
Posts: 287
Sat Oct 25, 2008 9:44 am      Reply with quote
An optimum loading for glycerin in a formula is usually 1% to 3%. This is best for drawing moisture from the atmosphere, to the skin rather than from the skin, to the atmosphere.

Remember, glycerin is a dirt cheap commodity product. It is just pennies per kilogram, so its easy to "overload" in a formula just to save cost. But overloading can draw moisture away from your skin in this case.

If it is in the ingredients list in second, third, or even fourth position, there is a chance it is overloaded in a formula. But, don't worry if it is "near the top" of the list, because that may be the proper loading position.

No, jojoba oil and macadamia oil are not the only botanical emollients that are very good for the skin. I can think of others such as meadowfoam, high oleic safflower, etc. I'm just very familiar with jojoba and macadamia and like working with those two because of proven good results.

Not all creams and lotions are a waste of money. It all depends on the user and his or her skin type. One lotion that may be good for you, may be not so good for another user since we all have slightly different skin characteristics. The best way to find out if the product is right for you is to use it, and observe the effects. If you don't see or feel any type of improvement, then don't stay with that product too long. That's when you start wasting money.

John
SusieQ
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 10 Nov 2002
Posts: 1458
Sat Oct 25, 2008 9:52 am      Reply with quote
Good article, but I think its a PH level thing happening to skin which makes it drier especially after cleansing.

If you can find a toner with emollients and antiaging ingredients, its possible to go without moisturizers. I have tried this and my skin DOES feel quite comfortable with nothing else on except spf 15 for day time. Mind you I don't do this on a daily basis. Skin care is not static. You have to determine whats going on with your skin daily and apply the appropriate product for whats happening at the time.
foxe
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 25 Mar 2007
Posts: 1932
Sat Oct 25, 2008 10:56 am      Reply with quote
Since I started digging into skin care research this past year, I have read similiar reports such as the one this thread is about - that skin creams are not good for the skin, but rather dehydrate it. This study does lend some substance to the issue.

Dr. Pickart of Skin Biology is one who has always preached against moisturizers like these. He promotes Biological Oils instead and has presented studies of positive results of using BHO's like Emu Oil, Squalene and Calypso Oils.

His comments can be found on his website:

http://www.skinbio.com/moisturizers.html#What%20is%20Lipid%20Replenishment?

In summary:

Many skin moisturizers sold by cosmetic companies cause long-term damage to your skin.
Traditional skin moisturizers are formulated from a variety of low-cost oils and water-soluble chemicals that wet and loosen the skin's layer of outer protective proteins and also cover the skin with fats that impede water loss. This provides a brief moisturization of your skin but degrades the skin's protective properties against bacteria and viruses. Such moisturizing creams are a mixture of oil and water plus emulsifiers, stabilizers, preservatives and other chemicals. There is little evidence that such creams have any beneficial effect on skin.
Skin Biology has developed three skin moisturizers composed of biological oils to aid with skin moisturization but without causing skin damage. These are Emu Oil-S for Skin, Pure Squalane, and Calypso's Oil. Emu Oil-S for Skin is very similar in composition to human skin oils and acts to replenish skin lipids. Squalane/Squalane are the major lipids in human skin but decline from about 15% of fats in the skin to 5% by age 55. This decline is a key factor in a drier skin skin as we age. Calypso's Oil is a more protective oil originally designed for persons with eczema and composed of octyl palmitate, sesame oil, and sweet almond oil.

While lipid replenishment methods are still being developed by dermatological scientists, emu oil is already a very good natural oil for lipid replenishment. The fatty acid composition of human skin oil and Emu Oil are very similar. In both oils, mono-unsaturated oleic acid is the most prevalent, then palmitic acid, followed by the essential fatty acid- linoleic acid. This may be the reason for the positive actions of Emu Oil on human skin. (Zemtsov et al 1996)


Dr. Pickart goes on to list other studies and their results on BHOs.

Looks like your Emu Oil is OK to use, bethany. No damage to the skin barrier with this one. But, there are lots of moisturizers out there that fit the bill that the original poster used saying that the degrade the skin barrier. We all want to know which ones, tho, don't we?

_________________
mid 50's, fair skin, very oily, few fine lines (thanks to the oily skin & little tanning!), vertical lip lines, crows feet & 11's, fighting aging! Using Palancia HF, dermarollers, CPs, Retin A Micro, Safetox, AALS, Clairsonic
bethany
VIP Member
20% products discount
free skin care

View user's profileSend private message
Joined: 08 Apr 2008
Posts: 8264
Sat Oct 25, 2008 11:35 am      Reply with quote
foxe wrote:

Looks like your Emu Oil is OK to use, bethany. No damage to the skin barrier with this one. But, there are lots of moisturizers out there that fit the bill that the original poster used saying that the degrade the skin barrier. We all want to know which ones, tho, don't we?


I'm not really worried about my emu oil going bad like rancid chicken either, lol...mine has a small amount of Vit E as a natural preservative, and I only dispense 2oz at a time (the rest stays in the fridge and has a shelf life of at least 18 months).

I think the key is that ANY moisturizer should not be overused (meaning daily), because that opens the door to skin addiction.

Here is a link to the section of Dr. Obagi's dermatology textbook where he specially discusses moisturizer addiction and the negative impact on your skin..pages 23-25 are the key info.

http://books.google.com/books?id=H2fnydnNRiUC&pg=PA23&lpg=PA23&dq=obagi+moisturizer+addiction&source=web&ots=WHdGt09aXd&sig=wG24aOcpg1vQHel8_1-lxb82koI&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=3&ct=result#PPA23,M1

_________________
Not posting here as much; PM me if you need info on my favs: Epionce, Environ, Merbe, Tua Tre'nd, BioWave. Not affiliated with any vendor.
System
Automatic Message
Thu Apr 24, 2014 7:28 pm
If this is your first visit to the EDS Forums please take the time to register. Registration is required for you to post on the forums. Registration will also give you the ability to track messages of interest, send private messages to other users, participate in Gift Certificates draws and enjoy automatic discounts for shopping at our online store. Registration is free and takes just a few seconds to complete.

Click Here to join our community.

If you are already a registered member on the forums, please login to gain full access to the site.

Reply to topic



Peter Thomas Roth Blemish Buster Treatment Kit (5 items) Carita Ideal Cotton Serum (30 ml / 1 oz) Bremenn Rosacea Redness Rehab (30 ml / 1 floz)